How to Structure Data from an IoT Monitoring Network

Laptop computer. Portable electronics, technology, computing. UF/IFAS Photo: Thomas Wright.

The Internet of Things, or IoT, refers to the billions of physical devices that collect and share data through the Internet. This 5-page publication discusses the typical attributes in IoT monitoring networks and presents a data structure that outlines best practices in organizing data. Written by Ziwen Yu, and published by the UF/IFAS Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering, November 2020.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ae548

How Is Our Future Climate Projected?

Storm rising over a farm.

Climate is the long-term patterns and fluctuations in air and moisture. This 5-page article explains how future climate is projected using mathematical models and introduces common scientific terms used when discussing climate change. Written by Young Gu Her, Zachary Brym, Ashley Smyth, and Elias Bassil, and published by the UF/IFAS Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering, November 2020.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ae546

¿Perdidos en la maleza? Una guia exhaustiva de malas hierbas no autoctonas en Florida

Air potato (Dioscorea bulbifera) invasion in south Florida (Broward County). Air potato is on the Florida Noxious Weed List. FDACS DPI oversees and enforces this list.

Este artículo tiene como objetivo informar al público en general, administradores de tierras, investigadores, autoridades locales y estatales, y a todo aquel que busque orientación para acceder a listados de plantas no autóctonas en el estado de Florida, tanto normativos como no normativos. En este documento se explica el origen de las listas, el significado de la inclusión en una lista en concreto y la forma de acceder a cada una de ellas. Written by Deah Lieurance, Lyn A. Gettys, and Germán Sandoya-Miranda, and published by the UF/IFAS Agronomy Department, November 2020.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ag444

Pintoi Peanut: A Seed-Propagated Perennial Peanut Forage Option for Florida

Pintoi peanut stolons (runners) growing parallel to the soil surface.

Because of its adaptability to Florida's environmental conditions and ability to produce viable seeds, pintoi peanut represents an interesting forage alternative for cow-calf producers in the state. This 5-page document provides current information on pintoi peanut for forage and livestock producers in Florida. Written by Joao M. D. Sanchez, Joao Vendramini, Maria L. Silveira, Jose C. B. Dubeux Jr., Lynn E. Sollenberger, and Philipe Moriel, and published by the UF/IFAS Agronomy Department, November 2020.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ag445

Best Management Practices for Live Bee Removals in Florida: A Beekeeper’s Guide

Photo of a mass of bees on honeycomb.

Feral colonies of honey bees nesting near humans or domestic animals can pose a stinging threat and may be considered a nuisance and possibly a threat to animal or public health, and therefore bees often need to be removed or eradicated when they are found nesting near homes or other property. This 14-page guide written by Mary Bammer, Jamie Ellis, Eric Baxter, Krista Butler, John Coldwell, B. Keith Councell, Kevin Easton, Brendhan Horne, Brandi Stanford, and Amy T. Vu and published by the UF/IFAS Entomology and Nematology Department details best management practices for live bee removals and serves as a reference for beekeepers who choose to perform live bee removal services in Florida.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/in1297

Container Mosquito Habitat Community Cleanup: A How-To Guide for Event Organization

Extreme close-up photo of a mosquito revealing its bright white stripes and feathery antennae.
Being bitten by the container mosquitoes Aedes aegypti and Ae. albopictus means a higher risk of becoming infected with Zika, dengue, or chikungunya virus. Container mosquitoes develop in the water that collects in discarded tires, jars, cans, buckets, and boats. The best way to prevent irritating bites and dangerous mosquito-transmitted illnesses is to get rid of all trash that holds water. This 6-page fact sheet written by Amy Hallock, Eva A. Buckner, Ricky W. Telg, and Alena R. Poulin and published by the UF/IFAS Entomology and Nematology Department is packed with recommendations that will help you to successfully develop and host a cleanup event to reduce potential mosquito larval habitats in your community and keep yourself and your neighbors safe.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/in1286

Sampling Guidelines and Recommendations for Submitting Samples for Diagnosing Laurel Wilt in Avocado Trees (Persea americana L.)

Laurel wilt symptoms in avocado trees include green leaf wilting, desiccated (brown) leaves, and stem and limb dieback. Credits: J. H. Crane, UF/IFAS TREC

Laurel wilt (LW) is a vascular disease caused by a fungal pathogen transmitted to avocado trees by several ambrosia beetle species and through root grafts among adjacent avocado trees. A critical part of preventing and controlling plant diseases is determining the causal agent so that the appropriate management practices can be implemented to eradicate or contain the outbreak. Proper sampling is a critical step in disease diagnosis and in the determination of the causal agent of disease. This new 3-page publication of the UF/IFAS Horticultural Sciences Department was written by Jonathan Crane, Romina Gazis, Jeff Wasielewski, Daniel Carrillo, Bruce Schaffer, Fredy Ballen, and Edward Evans.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1394

Programacion de Riego Basado en el Metodo de Evapotranspiracion Para Papaya (Carica papaya) en Florida

Fruiting papaya trees at the Tropical Research and Education Center in Homestead, FL. UF/IFAS Photo: Thomas Wright

La papaya es un importante cultivo frutícola que se cultiva en el sur de Florida con un área estimada de 356 acres. Este documento se centra en las técnicas de programación de riego basadas en ET para la papaya en las condiciones de Florida. Written by Haimanote K. Bayabil, Jonathan H. Crane, Kati W. Migliaccio, Yuncong Li, Fredy Ballen, and Sandra Guzmán, and published by the UF/IFAS Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering, November 2020.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ae547

Eastern Indigo Snake

Photo of snake's head viewed from above, grass visible under it.

Learn more about eastern indigo snakes!
The Wildlife of Florida Factsheet series was created to provide the public with a quick, accurate introduction to Florida's wildlife, including both native and invasive species. Authors Tyler Buckley and Raoul K. Boughton hope this 2-page quick guide and others in the series published by the UF/IFAS Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation will inspire readers to investigate wildlife in their own backyards and communities and understand the amazing biodiversity of wildlife in the state of Florida.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/uw475

Tomato Brown Rugose Fruit Virus (ToBRFV): A Potential Threat for Tomato Production in Florida

Freshly picked tomatoes.

Tobamoviruses are mechanically transmitted plant viruses that cause severe economic damage to vegetable and ornamental crops in Florida and worldwide. While certain tomato cultivars have genetic resistance to the most common tobamoviruses, no commercial tomato cultivars are resistant to tomato brown rugose fruit virus (ToBRFV), a recently described tobamovirus that also infects pepper and eggplant. It is currently unknown how ToBRFV may affect tomato production in Florida. This new 5-page publication of the UF/IFAS Plant Pathology Department describes symptoms of the virus, how it is different from other tobamoviruses, and how it is transmitted, as well as what to do if you think you have ToBRFV in your field. Written by Ozgur Batuman, Salih Yilmaz, Pamela Roberts, Eugene McAvoy, Samuel Hutton, Kishore Dey, and Scott Adkins.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/pp360

El sapo de caña o “Bufo” (Rhinella marina) en Florida

close-up photo of male and female cane toads.

El sapo de caña (Rhinella marina), a veces conocido como el “bufo”, sapo gigante o marino, es nativo del extremo sur de Texas, México, América Central y la zona tropical de la América del Sur, pero está establecido en Florida. Los sapos de caña se introdujeron inicialmente en Florida como un método de control biológico de plagas en la década de 1930. Se suponía que los sapos comieran escarabajos que amenazaran el cultivo de la caña de azúcar, pero la población introducida no sobrevivió. This 7-page fact sheet written by S. A. Johnson, A. Wilson, and Armando J. Ubeda and published by the UF/IFAS Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation is the Spanish translation of The Cane or “Bufo” Toad (Rhinella marina) in Florida.
https:edis.ifas.ufl.edu/uw477

The Life of Lichen

Close-up photo of deer moss growing among dry leaves and grasses.

Lichen represent a fascinating combination of organisms working together to form some familiar and unfamiliar growths on a variety of substrates. This 6-page fact sheet written by James Stevenson, Lara B. Milligan, and Jennifer L. Gillett-Kaufman and published by the UF/IFAS Entomology and Nematology Department defines and explains these organisms.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/in1296

Biology and Management of Florida Betony (Stachys floridana) in Ornamental Plants in Landscape Planting Beds

Florida betony inflorescence. Credits: Chris Marble, UF/IFAS

Florida betony (Stachys floridana) is a perennial weed in Florida landscape planting beds, gardens, turfgrass, and agricultural production systems. This new 4-page article is written for green industry professionals and others to aid in the identification and management of Florida betony in and around ornamental plants in landscape planting beds. Written by Thomas Smith and Chris Marble, and published by the UF/IFAS Environmental Horticulture Department.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep597

Herbicide Resistance Management in Florida Tomato Production

Cherry tomatoes. Photo taken 05-09-16. Photo Credits: UF/IFAS Photo by Tyler Jones

Herbicide resistance was historically not a significant issue in most horticultural crops because few herbicides were applied. Close proximity of agronomic crops and the loss of methyl bromide has led to a gradual increase in herbicide inputs and the increased occurrence of herbicide-resistant weeds in tomato fields. Very few herbicides are registered for tomato, and resistance is a major concern. This new 11-page publication of the UF/IFAS Horticultural Sciences Department provides a definition of herbicide resistance, explains how it develops, and provides management recommendations for tomato growers. It was written for growers and Extension agents, but the information may be of interest to anyone concerned about herbicide resistance in vegetable and small fruit crops. Written by Shaun M. Sharpe, Nathan S. Boyd, Ramdas G. Kanissery, and Peter J. Dittmar.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1398

Facts about Wildlife Diseases: Raccoon-Borne Pathogens of Importance to Humans—The Raccoon Roundworm

Photo of a raccoon standing in shallow water in the daytime. It has spotted the photographer and is gazing at the camera.

Diseases carried by northern raccoons present significant health hazards to both people and pets. This 7-page fact sheet written by Caitlin Jarvis and Mathieu Basille and published by the UF/IFAS Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation is part of a series addressing health hazards associated with raccoons. It describes the raccoon roundworm and the disease it causes, baylisascariasis, which normally causes little or no trouble to raccoons but in severe cases can make people and their pets very sick. Sick wild animals can act tame, but do not approach! Contact animal control or a wildlife rehabilitator if an animal seems to be behaving abnormally or if you suspect it is sick.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/uw480

Facts about Wildlife Diseases: Raccoon-Borne Pathogens of Importance to Humans—Parasites

A raccoon perched in a lichen-covered tree at night faces the camera. One forepaw is visible.
Diseases carried by northern raccoons present significant health hazards to both people and pets. This 7-page fact sheet written by Caitlin Jarvis and Mathieu Basille and published by the UF/IFAS Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation is part of a series addressing health hazards associated with raccoons. It describes the most important internal and external parasites associated with raccoons. Sick wild animals can act tame, but do not approach! Contact animal control or a wildlife rehabilitator if an animal seems to be behaving abnormally or if you suspect it is sick.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/uw479

Facts about Wildlife Diseases: Raccoon-Borne Pathogens of Importance to Humans—Viruses and Bacteria

photo of a raccoon taken at night and spotlit by the flash.

Diseases carried by northern raccoons present significant health hazards to both people and pets. This 7-page fact sheet written by Caitlin Jarvis, Samantha M. Wisely, and Mathieu Basille and published by the UF/IFAS Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation is part of a series addressing health hazards associated with raccoons. It describes rabies, canine distemper, feline distemper, canine parvovirus, salmonellosis, and several other raccoon-borne viral and bacterial diseases of concern to people and their pets. Sick wild animals can act tame, but do not approach! Contact animal control or a wildlife rehabilitator if an animal seems to be behaving abnormally or if you suspect it is sick.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/uw478

Leches a base de plantas: Coco

A tulip glass half full of coconut milk. Credit: Lincoln Zotarelli, UF/IFAS

La leche de coco es una de las muchas variedades de alternativas vegetales a la leche de vaca. Los factores que pueden llevar a los consumidores hacia alternativas a la leche no láctea incluyen la adherencia a una dieta vegana, la intolerancia a la lactosa, la alergia a la leche de vaca o simplemente la preferencia. El propósito de esta guía es informarle sobre el contenido de nutrientes de la leche de coco y sus posibles beneficios y riesgos para la salud.
This new 4-page article is the Spanish language version of FSHN20-49/FS411, Plant-Based Milks: Coconut, written by Celia Andreo, Daniela Rivero-Mendoza, and Wendy J Dahl, and published by the UF/IFAS Food Science and Human Nutrition Department.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fs421

The Road to Recovery: Building Physical and Emotional Trust when Engaging with Extension Clientele

The virus that causes COVID-19

Now is a crucial time for Extension professionals to engage with clientele. In both urban and rural communities, clients are facing a multitude of unprecedented challenges related to COVID-19. Many Extension professionals already have experience in emergency and disaster preparedness, response, and recovery that can be applied in the present context. However, we must rethink how we interact with and assist clientele to ensure their safety and our own. To do this, it is critical we understand that the pandemic has exacerbated emotional trauma and anxiety resulting in trust gaps. This new 4-page publication of the UF/IFAS Department of Agricultural Education and Communication aims to build Extension professionals’ sensitivity to the needs and emotional strains that COVID-19 presents for clients, and the strategies needed for effective recovery. Written by Colby Silvert, Cody Gusto, and John Diaz.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/wc376

Smutgrass Control in Perennial Grass Pastures

Smutgrass infestations are common in bahiagrass pastures throughout Florida.

This 4-page document provides an overview of smutgrass biology, control, and general recommendations. Written by Brent Sellers, Neha Rana, José Luiz C. S. Dias, and Pratap Devkota, and published by the UF/IFAS Agronomy Department, revised October 2020.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/aa261