Citrus Pest Quick Guide: Lebbeck Mealybug Nipaecoccus viridis (Newstead)

A close-up photo of a female lebeck mealybug looking like a miniscule white fluffy bedroom slipper on the underside of a green leaf.

A one-page quick guide written by Lauren M. Diepenbrock and Jamie D. Burrow and published by the Entomology and Nematology Department presents the life cycle of the lebbeck mealybug and provides several photos of the pest and the damage it causes to assist in identification.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/in1280

Citrus Pest Quick Guide: Citrus Leafminer (Phyllocnistis citrella Stainton)

closeup of an adult citrus leafminer on a leaf

A one-page quick guide written by Lauren M. Diepenbrock and Jamie D. Burrow and published by the Entomology and Nematology Department presents the life cycle of the citrus leafminer and provides several photos of the pest and the damage it causes to assist in identification.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/in1254

Citrus Pest Quick Guide: Brown Soft Scale (Coccus hesperidum Linnaeus)

yellowish, oval brown soft scale on a citrus leaf

A one-page quick guide written by Lauren M. Diepenbrock and Jamie D. Burrow and published by the Entomology and Nematology Department presents the life cycle of brown soft scale and provides several photos of the pest and the damage it causes to assist in identification.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/in1252

Citrus Pest Quick Guide: Diaprepes Root Weevil (Diaprepes abbreviates Linnaeus)

Diaprepes adult

A one-page quick guide written by Lauren M. Diepenbrock and Jamie D. Burrow and published by the Entomology and Nematology Department presents the life cycle of the Diaprepes root weevil and provides several photos of the pest and the damage it causes to assist in identification.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/in1249

Formation of Citrus Canker Lesions

Formation of Citrus Canker Lesions

Citrus canker is a non-systemic bacterial disease that affects citrus trees in both the citrus nursery and in commercial plantings. This poster is designed to assist citrus nursery workers in the identification of citrus canker. This one-page document was written by Jamie Burrow, Megan Dewdney, Ajia Paolillo, and Tim Riley and published by the UF/IFAS Plant Pathology Department.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/pp346

Citrus Production Guide: Plant Growth Regulators

Citrus groves around Lake Alfred, Florida. Oranges, fruit, trees. UF/IFAS Photo by Tyler Jones.

Plant growth regulators (PGRs) are a tool used to manipulate vegetative and reproductive growth, flowering, and fruit growth and development. PGRs have been successfully used in agriculture for decades to amend plant growth characteristics to maximize yield and grower profit. This new 4-page fact sheet discusses auxins, gibberellins, cytokinins, abscisic acid, ethylene, new classes of plant hormones, use of PGRs for HLB-affected trees, and general considerations for PGR use in Florida citrus groves. Written by Tripti Vashisth, Chris Oswalt, Mongi Zekri, Fernando Alferez, and Jamie D. Burrow, and published by the UF/IFAS Horticultural Sciences Department, February 2018.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1310

Citrus Tree Care for the Home Gardener in the HLB Era

Since the early 2000s, growing citrus has become much more challenging due to plant disease pressure. HLB is the most devastating disease affecting Florida citrus, and threatens the survival of the citrus industry. This 4-page document describes citrus growth and care while managing the risk of an HLB infection. Written by Jamie D. Burrow, Tripti Vashisth, Megan Dewdney, and Brooke Moffis and published by the UF/IFAS Plant Pathology Department, November 2017.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/pp336

Citrus Fruit Blemishes and Decay Caused by Fungi and Bacteria

This new one-page citrus identification fact sheet illustrates different blemishes from fungi and bacteria that affect citrus. Written by Mark A. Ritenour, Jamie D. Burrow, Megan M. Dewdney, and John Zhang and published by the Horticultural Sciences Department.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1291

Citrus Nutrition Management Practices


A new two-page fact sheet has been published by the Horticultural Sciences Department and the UF/IFAS Citrus Research and Education Center about citrus nutrition management practices. It was written by J.D. Burrow, T. Vashisth, M. Zekri, S.H. Futch, and A. Schumann.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1292

Florida Citrus Activity Book

The Florida Citrus Activity Book is a basic introduction to Florida citrus trees, diseases, and pests. This 20-page booklet is for elementary students. Written by J.D. Burrow, M.M. Dewdney, M.E. Rogers, and T. Vashisth and published by the Plant Pathology Department.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/pp331

Frequently Asked Questions About Huanglongbing (HLB; citrus greening) for Homeowners

Figure 5. Color inversion and oblong fruit shape caused by HLB infection. Credits: Megan M. Dewdney, UF/IFAS CREC
Huanglongbing (HLB), also known as citrus greening, is a serious bacterial disease that affects citrus in Florida. Florida residents enjoy growing citrus for a variety of reasons, but growing citrus in today’s disease climate is not an easy task. This seven-page document is designed to help Master Gardeners and homeowners answer commonly asked questions about HLB. Written by Brooke L. Moffis, Jamie D. Burrow, Megan M. Dewdney, and Michael E. Rogers and published by the Plant Pathology Department.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/pp326

Phytophtora Management in Citrus Nurseries

edis blog pic
Check out the new fact sheet about Phytopthora Management in Citrus Nurseries. A great on-hand resource, this fact sheet covers sanitation practices, tools, and potting media for citrus nurseries. It also illustrates correct and incorrect practices and provides information about disinfectants and chemicals to use. Written by Megan M. Dewdney and Jamie D. Burrow, and published by the Plant Pathology Department.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/pp322

Dooryard Citrus Production: Asiatic Citrus Canker Disease

Figure 3. Young canker lesions on leaves have a blister-like appearance with water-soaked margins. Photo is magnified to show detail of lesions.
Asiatic citrus canker is a bacterial disease of citrus that causes necrotic lesions on leaves, stems, and fruit of infected trees. Severe cases can cause defoliation, premature fruit drop, twig dieback, and general tree decline.This eight-page fact sheet explains the history of citrus canker in Florida, describes the symptoms of citrus canker, and details how to manage the spread of citrus canker disease by preventing infection and controlling existing infections. Written by Megan M. Dewdney, Jamie D. Burrow, James H. Graham, Timothy M. Spann, and Ryan A. Atwood, and published by the Horticultural Sciences department.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/pp323