Implementation of Anaerobic Soil Disinfestation in Florida Tomato Production

Application of molasses as a soil amendment

Anaerobic soil disinfestation (ASD) is a relatively new technique that appears to be a promising tool for soilborne pest management and crop production improvement. This new 5-page publication of the UF/IFAS Horticultural Sciences Department is intended to introduce ASD for Florida vegetable growers. Written by Bodh R. Paudel, Francesco Di Gioia, Qiang Zhu, Xin Zhao, Monica Ozores-Hampton, Marilyn E. Swisher, Kaylene Sattanno, Jason C. Hong, and Erin N. Rosskopf.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1345

Guidelines for Pomegranate Nutrient Management in Florida

Pomegranate

Many Florida growers are interested in the potential of pomegranate as an alternative fruit crop. The first flush of flowers produces the best quality fruit, and climatic conditions have a great impact on the timing of flowering. Proper fertilization is critical to promote healthy canopy development, minimize nutrient disorders, and maximize fruit yield and quality. This new 5-page article, written by Shinsuke Agehara, Weining Wang, and Ali Sarkhosh and published by the UF/IFAS Horticultural Sciences Department, provides guidelines for pomegranate nutrient management in Florida.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1347

Variedades de Durazno y Nectarina en la Florida

'Flordaprince'

La Universidad de la Florida ha desarrollado cultivares de nectarina y durazno de alta calidad, bajo requerimiento de horas frio, y de maduracion temprana que pueden cultivarse desde el Panhandle de la Florida (noroeste del estado) tan al sur como Immokalee. Cultivares de bajas horas frio pueden crecer y producir fruta bajo las condiciones de la Florida que son mucho mas calidas en el invierno que en estados mas al norte. This 18-page fact sheet, translated by Tatiana Sanchez and published by the UF/IFAS Horticultural Sciences Department, is the Spanish-language version of CIR1159, Florida Peach and Nectarine Varieties, written by Ali Sarkhosh, Mercy Olmstead, Jose Chaparro, Pete Andersen, and Jeff Williamson.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1346

Bok Choy, an Asian Leafy Green Vegetable Emerging in Florida

Bok choy plants with green petioles

Asian vegetable crops are rapidly expanding in Florida in the last decade due to their health benefits combined with their high profitability. These crops can help increase vegetable growers’ income and diversify Florida’s crop production, and they are new to most Floridians. This new 5-page article provides a general overview of bok choy for vegetable growers, crop consultants, certified crop advisors, Extension agents, and graduate students. Written by Hai Liu and Guodong Liu and published by the UF/IFAS Horticultural Sciences Department.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1337

The UF/IFAS Strawberry Clean Plant Program

A verification trial at UF/IFAS GCREC

Florida strawberry growers primarily utilize cultivars developed by the UF/IFAS Strawberry Breeding Program. These cultivars are bred to provide the yield and quality traits needed by the Florida industry. Yet if a new cultivar has the traits that Florida growers need but pathogen-tested planting stock is not available to growers, the cultivar’s impact will be limited. The Clean Plant Program generates the pathogen-tested planting stock that nurseries and growers require. This new 5-page publication of the UF/IFAS Horticultural Sciences Department, written by Catalina Moyer, Natalia A. Peres, and Vance M. Whitaker, is intended to educate both the industry and the public on the importance of the Clean Plant Program and the methods used to produce planting stock of new cultivars.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1343

Stock Plant and Tree Production: Weed Management in Citrus Nurseries

Hairy bittercress

All citrus nursery stock in Florida is raised in enclosed greenhouses. It is not uncommon for weeds to grow in containers, where they compete with citrus seedlings, and on greenhouse floors, where they can harbor pests and diseases. This new 7-page publication of the UF/IFAS Horticultural Sciences Department provides descriptions of a few commonly found weeds in citrus nurseries and good weed management practices. Written by Biwek Gairhe, Ramdas Kanissery, and Brent Sellers, this article is chapter 8c of the forthcoming Citrus Nursery Production Guide.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1344

Impacts of Hurricane Damage on Southern Highbush Blueberries

Flooded blueberry container production after Hurricane Irma

Florida has been affected by eight hurricanes since 2000. This new 3-page publication discusses the types of hurricane damage that occur in blueberry production operations, the impacts of these damages, and some recommendations on best management practices in the aftermath of a storm. Written by Douglas A. Phillips, Jeffrey G. Williamson, and Philip F. Harmon and published by the UF/IFAS Horticultural Sciences Department.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1342

Weeds as Reservoirs of Plant Pathogens Affecting Economically Important Crops

White clover, a member of the Fabaceae family.

Weeds are a major contributor to yield loss and reduction in yield quality in an agricultural setting, competing with the crop for resources like light, water, and nutrients. This competition, along with the cost of weed management strategies like tillage and herbicides, is responsible for the economic impact of weeds, which can reach into the billions. Weeds can also harm crop plants by acting as reservoirs for destructive plant pathogens, the insect vectors that move these pathogens from plant to plant, or both. This new 7-page publication of the UF/IFAS Horticultural Sciences Department, written by Morgan Byron, Danielle Treadwell, and Peter Dittmar, summarizes previously published weed-pathogen associations to help growers scout and monitor pathogens in weeds near production areas.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1335

Identification and Management of Clustered Pellitory (Parietaria praetermissa) in Citrus Groves

New seedling emergence of clustered pellitory in a citrus grove.

In Florida, clustered pellitory is becoming a troublesome weed for citrus, especially from the winter through early summer. Inadequate management of this weed can result in its heavy infestation in tree rows and can interrupt the spray pattern of low-volume drip irrigation systems. This new 3-page publication of the UF/IFAS Horticultural Sciences Department will assist Florida citrus growers with proper identification of clustered pellitory and with adoption of adequate and timely strategies to manage this weed in their groves. Written by Ramdas Kanissery, Biwek Gairhe, Brent Sellers, and Steve Futch.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1341

Rootstock Selection

Citrus research in a greenhouse at Citrus REC in Lake Alfred.

The large number of different rootstock varieties currently available for citrus production in Florida is unprecedented. This new 4-page article, chapter 4 of the forthcoming UF/IFAS Citrus Nursery Production Guide, provides information on rootstock uses in Florida, rootstock propagation, and the impact of tissue culture, as well as factors to consider when deciding which rootstock to plant. Written by Ute Albrecht, Manjul Dutt, and Jude Grosser and published by the UF/IFAS Horticultural Sciences Department.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1340

Seed and Budwood Production, Transport, and Conservation

Dr. Fred Gmitter examining citrus trees in a greenhouse at the Citrus Research and Education Center in Lake Alfred. Photo taken 03/08/16.

The Florida citrus industry maintains a high demand for trees for replanting and resetting, as well as an interest in new releases of rootstocks and scions with improved disease and abiotic stress tolerances. One of the main constraints for liner production in great numbers is time. The consensus among citrus nurseries is that it takes two years to produce enough quantities of budwood to establish seed block trees when a new interesting rootstock is produced. This new 3-page article addresses the practices and challenges of producing seeds and budwood in Florida. This article, chapter 7 of the forthcoming Citrus Nursery Production Guide, was written by Fernando Alferez and Mireia Bordas and is a publication of the UF/IFAS Horticultural Sciences Department.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1336

Citrus Rootstock Propagation: Traditional Techniques and Recent Advances

Freshly cut single internodes placed in potting mix with leaf blade attached but reduced in size

Commercially grown citrus trees are usually composed of two parts: 1) the scion, which is the aboveground portion of the tree that produces the fruit, and 2) the rootstock, which comprises the root system and the lower portion of the trunk. This new 4-page publication, chapter 6 of the forthcoming Citrus Nursery Production Guide, discusses three kinds of rootstock propagation: seed, cuttings, and tissue culture. Written by Ute Albrecht, Lorenzo Rossi, and Mongi Zekri and published by the UF/IFAS Horticultural Sciences Department.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1329

Current Status of Research, Regulations, and Future Challenges for CRISPR Gene Editing in Crop Improvement

Hydroponic tomatoes growing on the vine in a greenhouse. Photo taken on 03-14-17

Recently, new plant-breeding technology such as CRISPR gene editing has provided the potential to substantially improve crop breeding in agriculture. Considerable efforts have been devoted to apply this gene-editing technology in modern agriculture to increase crop yields and improve the quality of food ingredients, especially by many of the major agronomic seed-producing companies. In this new 4-page article, we outline the recent research updates and regulations on gene editing in crop improvement. Written by Sadikshya Sharma, Heqiang Huo, and Seonghee Lee and published by the UF/IFAS Horticultural Sciences Department.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1334

Stock Plant and Tree Production: Irrigation and Fertilization

Drip irrigation

Citrus tree production in nurseries can be divided into three stages: production of rootstock liners, transplant of rootstocks into larger containers, and bud grafting. The objectives of this new 6-page publication of the UF/IFAS Horticultural Sciences Department are to provide general information on irrigation and fertilization for production of citrus nursery trees in seedbeds, nurseries and budwood multiplication blocks. This article, written by Rhuanito Soranz Ferrarezi, is chapter 8b of the forthcoming Citrus Nursery Production Guide.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1333

Biology and Management of Pusley (Richardia L.) in Tomato, Pepper, Cucurbit, and Strawberry Production

Brazil pusley flowers. Credit: Shaun M. Sharpe, UF/IFAS

Four species of pusley (Richardia L.) are widespread and common weeds in Florida vegetable and strawberry production. We refer to the native plant Richardia scabra L. as Florida pusley. This discrimination is necessary because these species are often referred to collectively as Florida pusley due to overlapping distributions, similar growth habits and leaf morphologies, and difficulty identifying without the presence of fruit. This new 6-page publication of the UF/IFAS Horticultural Sciences Department describes the different pusley species and provides management options for strawberry, pepper, cucurbits, and tomato. Written by Shaun M. Sharpe, Nathan S. Boyd, Chris Marble, and Shawn Steed.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1331

Plant Biostimulants: Definition and Overview of Categories and Effects

Fucus distichus

This new 4-page article provides an overview of a group of crop production materials termed “plant biostimulants,” which are frequently promoted as environment-friendly alternatives to chemical-based products. It explains their regulatory status and presents an overview of the most popular materials (e.g., beneficial fungi, seaweeds, and silicon) and their effects on plants. Written by Ute Albrecht and published by the UF/IFAS Horticultural Sciences Department.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1330

La Granada en Florida: Una fruta de arbol para Florida?

Árbol de granada ('Wonderful' cv.)

El potencial económico en la producción comercial para el cultivo de granadas en Florida es actualmente desconocido en este momento. La investigación científica continúa sobre la posibilidad de encontrar variedades de granadas que puedan crecer en Florida. Las condiciones ambientales, con una alta temporada húmeda en la Florida, y un clima caluroso, son factores que son favorables para las enfermedades en las granadas y eso reduce la calidad de esta fruta, especialmente para las variedades de temporada tardía como la variedad ‘Wonderful’. ‘Wonderful’ es el principal cultivar comercial que se originó en la Florida. Para reducir las enfermedades y evitar la competencia de comercialización con las granadas de California, la investigación para la producción de granadas en la Florida debe centrarse en buscar variedades de temporada temprana que puedan cosecharse en julio y agosto. This six-page document is the Spanish translation of HS44, The Pomegranate. Written by Ali Sarkhosh and Jeff Williamson, translated by Eva Pabon, and published by the UF/IFAS Horticultural Sciences Department.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs294

Protecting Perishable Foods During Transport by Truck and Rail

Airfoil accessories to increase fuel efficiency: underbody fairings

The importance of protecting perishable foods from loss of quality during transport has long been recognized. Increased recognition of the importance of the transport link in the food distribution cold chain in securing the safety of perishable foods has more recently become as well recognized.
This updated edition reflects the dynamic changes and innovations in the handling and transportation of perishable foods. Some of these include improved insulation and air movement, microprocessors for more efficient refrigeration, expert systems to control the transport environment and conserve fuel energy, and the use of telematics to monitor and control the performance of refrigerated vehicles during transit. This edition includes descriptions and recommendations for food transported over the road and by rail in marine containers, as well as in railcars. This 214-page revision was written by J. K. Brecht, Steven A. Sargent, Patrick E. Brecht, Jorge Saenz, and Leonard Rodowick and published by the UF/IFAS Horticultural Sciences Department in cooperation with the USDA AMS Transportation Services Division.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1328

Biology and Management of Spanish Needles (Bidens spp.) in Ornamental Crop Production

Bidens alba flower

All eight species of Bidens in Florida are commonly referred to as Spanish needles or beggar-ticks. This document focuses on Bidens alba and B. pilosa, which are common weeds in container nurseries and landscapes in Florida. This 6-page EDIS publication, written by Yuvraj Khamare, Chris Marble, Shawn Steed, and Nathan Boyd and published by the UF/IFAS Environmental Horticulture Department, is designed for landowners, gardeners, horticulturalists, and consumers hoping to learn more about Spanish needle classification and management.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep572

Southern Highbush Blueberry Cultivars from the University of Florida

'Kestrel'TM

Southern highbush blueberries combine the fruit quality and productivity of highbush blueberries with the low chilling requirement necessary to produce a crop in the Florida climate. Written by J. G. Williamson, D. A. Phillips, P. M. Lyrene, and P. R. Munoz and published by the UF/IFAS Horticultural Sciences Department, this 13-page major revision describes current and historical southern highbush blueberry cultivars released by the University of Florida.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1245