Stem and Fruit Canker of Dragon Fruit in South Florida

Red dragon fruit

Dragon fruit, also known as pitahaya, pitaya, and strawberry pear, is a group of vine-like, climbing cacti. In south Florida, production of dragon fruit has been steadily increasing since the 2000s, and growers in Florida consider dragon fruit as a potential alternative fruit crop to avocado and citrus, two economically important fruit crops largely impacted by laurel wilt and huanglongbing, respectively. This new 4-page article focuses on the symptomology and epidemiology of stem and fruit canker, a prevailing disease on dragon fruit. Suggested management strategies for the disease are also discussed based on recent studies conducted in south Florida. Written by Cheng-Fang Hong, Shouan Zhang, Romina Gazis, Jonathan H. Crane, and Jeff Wasielewski, and published by the UF/IFAS Plant Pathology Department.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/pp355

Applying Culturally Relevant Teaching to Workshops: The Checklist

Students in a classroom taking a test. Image used in the 2014 Research Discoveries report.

As the diversity of Extension clientele continues to grow, Extension educators must consider new ways of supporting this population. In this new 2-page article, a follow-up to EDIS article AEC678, Culturally Responsive Teaching: A Framework for Educating Diverse Audience, the authors provide a checklist to serve as a guiding tool when planning workshops and to ensure that participants feel connected to, engaged with, and understood while working toward achieving workshop educational goals. Written by Cecilia E. Suarez, John M. Diaz, and Laura E. Valencia, and published by the UF/IFAS Department of Agricultural Education and Communication.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/wc351

Bringing Home the Bacon: Infusing Evaluation Best Practices into Grant Proposals

Work colleagues having a meeting in a conference room. Photo taken on 02-09-17.

Proposals possessing sound and well-funded evaluation plans are normally stronger and have greater chances of being funded. This new 4-page publication of the UF/IFAS Department of Agricultural Education and Communication shares information the authors learned during a series of meetings with federal agency program officers and evaluators about best practices for grant proposals. The practices encompass two broad categories: incorporating evaluation expertise into the project team and building a sound project rationale and evaluation plan. By adopting these practices, you will enhance the quality of your proposals; you will most likely increase the amount of extramural funding that is secured; and you will elevate the visibility and impact of programs within your organization. Written by Glenn Israel, Jaclyn D. Kropp, David C. Diehl, Conner Mullally, and Sebastian Galindo.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/wc350

Hop Yard Establishment and Trellis Construction in Florida

Hop plants illuminated by LED lamps at night

Hops (Humulus lupulus L.) are an essential ingredient in brewing, adding bitterness and flavor to beer. Driven by the recent craft beer movement, hop production is expanding into nontraditional hop-producing states. In Florida, while commercial hop production is almost nonexistent, the number of craft breweries in Florida increased from 45 in 2011 to 285 in 2018, and the economic impact of Florida’s craft beer industry exceeds $3 billion. This new 7-page article, written by Shinsuke Agehara, Aleyda Acosta-Rangel, Zhanao Deng, Jack Rechcigl, and Simon Bollin and published by the UF/IFAS Horticultural Sciences Department, provides guidelines and considerations for building a hop yard in Florida, using the UF/IFAS Gulf Coast Research and Education Center’s research hop yard as a model.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1354

Exemplary Youth Leadership Series: Inspire a Shared Vision

4H congress, 2005. UF/IFAS Photo: Thomas Wright.

This publication series is designed to outline strategies and experiences to expose youth to and engage them with leadership concepts. In this series, activities have been developed to introduce youth to Kouzes and Posner’s five practices of exemplary leaders. This new 2-page article allows students to engage with the second practice: inspiring a shared vision. Leaders shape the trajectory of their organization. The two outlined activities help students illustrate the idea of creating a unique vision and recruiting others to follow that vision. Written by Megan Stein and published by the UF/IFAS Department of Agricultural Education and Communication.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/wc348

Condensed Tannins in Forage Legumes

Alfalfa forage leaf

The use of tannin-containing forages has received attention from researchers around the globe because of potential benefits of condensed tannins to livestock health and nutrition as well as possibilities to reduce methane emission. This new 4-page publication of the UF/IFAS Agronomy Department targets two audiences: Extension faculty who need information on potential benefits and negative effects of condensed tannins to livestock production, and producers who intend to feed tannin-containing forages in their operation. Written by Flavia van Cleef and Jose Dubeux.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ag440

Considerations for Selection and Use of Ornamental Grasses

Scouring horsetail in a planter.

Ornamental grasses create interest and excitement in the landscape with their unique characteristics. The availability of a large number of species and cultivars makes these plants very versatile, with many potential uses in the landscape. This publication outlines many of the considerations for the proper selection and use of ornamental grasses. The information and tables should assist the first-time gardener as well as the experienced landscaper in the selection and use of ornamental grasses in Florida. This 9-page major revision was written by Mack Thetford and Mary Salinas and published by the UF/IFAS Environmental Horticulture Department.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep233

Simple Imaging Techniques for Plant Growth Assessment

Overhead canopy images of various crops converted to binary images using ImageJ for canopy cover measurements.

Quantification of plant phenotypic traits, such as height, width, stem diameter, and leaf area, is often performed manually in the field; however, these measurements can be performed more quickly and precisely through simple imaging techniques using an image processing program. This new 5-page publication of the UF/IFAS Horticultural Sciences Department, written by Shinsuke Agehara, describes simple imaging techniques for plant growth assessment using the public domain program ImageJ.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1353

Choosing the Right Blackberry Cultivar in Subtropical Florida

Blackberry bramble

Blackberry (Rubus spp.) is a deciduous berry crop and the fourth most economically important berry crop in the United States. Driven by the growing demand for blackberries, production recently expanded to the southeastern United States. In Florida, however, commercial blackberry production is limited primarily to small commercial U-pick operations. The main challenges include insufficient chill hours and poor fruit quality associated with the subtropical climate. This new 6-page article, a publication of the UF/IFAS Horticultural Sciences Department, will discuss important cultivar selection criteria and recommended blackberry cultivars in subtropical Florida. Written by Shinsuke Agehara, Syuan-You Lin, and Zhanao Deng.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1352

Florida Citrus Rootstock Selection Guide, 4th Edition

Citrus fruit on trees in the campus orange groves. Photo taken 06-22-18.

This updated 4th edition of the Florida Citrus Rootstock Selection Guide (FLCRSG) is a revision of the 2016 publication. The guide is a convenient, easy-to-use reference to 21 characteristics of 49 rootstocks. Of those, 12 are time-honored commercial rootstocks (highlighted in blue), which are the most reliably characterized. The next 13 rootstocks are minor commercial ones (highlighted in green) that are less frequently used today in Florida but may have been prominent at one time. The third group consists of the most recently released 24 rootstocks (highlighted in yellow) for which there is limited commercial experience. The new addition includes three new USDA rootstocks and updates information on a few traits. Written by William S. Castle, Kim D. Bowman, Jude W. Grosser, Rhuanito Soranz Ferrarezi, Stephen H. Futch, and Steve Rogers, and published by the UF/IFAS Horticultural Sciences Department.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1260

Smartirrigation Apps: Urban Turf

Smartirrigation Turf App

As freshwater resources become increasingly scarce, efficient irrigation scheduling methods that allow efficient irrigation water uses are required. Migliaccio et al. (2016) have developed an app called Smartirrigation Turf, an easy-to-use mobile tool that delivers information to improve irrigation scheduling for urban turf. The app was only available for Florida and Georgia, but recently, we have made improvements to the app and made it available to any location throughout the contiguous United States. The 7-page major revision, written by Haimanote K. Bayabil, K. W. Migliaccio, J. H. Debastiani Andreis, C. Fraisse, K. T. Morgan, and G. Vellidis, and published by the UF/IFAS Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering, describes the changes made on the recently released Smartirrigation Turf app.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ae499

Citrus Soil pH Testing Procedures

Electronic pH Tester

Maintaining the correct soil pH is essential to ensure optimal plant growth and crop yield. This new two-page document is an instructional sheet for citrus soil pH testing, written by Kelly Morgan and published by the UF/IFAS Department of Soil and Water Sciences.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ss665

Harvest Techniques for Hops (Humulus lupulus)

Hop cone formation. Left: newly formed hop burr. Right: mature hop cone.

Hops (Humulus lupulus) are perennial plants commonly harvested for their mature strobiles, also referred to as cones, which are primarily dried and used as a bittering agent and preservative in beer production. The two primary factors of harvest timing and harvest method can have large impacts on the quality and economics of the finished product. The decision of when and how to harvest is important and should rely upon growing-region-specific environmental conditions, physical observations of the cones, and the wants and needs of the individual producer. This new 4-page publication of the UF/IFAS Environmental Horticulture Department describes the primary methods used in hop harvesting, including field, indoor, and machine harvesting. Written by Sean Michael Campbell and Brian J. Pearson.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep578

Citrus Soil pH Management

Citrus fruit on trees in the campus orange groves. Photo taken 06-22-18.

Management of both soil pH and nutrients is required to maintain soil fertility levels and ensure economic agricultural production. Maintaining soil in the 6.0-6.5 pH range is best for most crops including citrus. This new two-page publication of the UF/IFAS Department of Soil and Water Sciences, written by Kelly Morgan, explains the effects of soil pH on citrus as well as options for management.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ss666

Conducting the Needs Assessment #2: Using Needs Assessments in Extension Programming

Duval County Extension Agent Anita McKinney teaches a "Smart Money" course at the Jacksonville City Rescue Mission in Jacksonville, Florida.

This second publication in the Conducting the Needs Assessment series provides Extension educators and other service providers with a foundational underpinning of how the needs assessment fits within the program planning process. Both formal and nonformal educators seeking to develop and deliver an educational program must first be informed of what their audience lacks in order to develop the right curriculum or training, and therefore conducting a needs assessment is a priority in the program development process. This new publication of the UF/IFAS Department of Agricultural Education and Communication was written by Matthew Benge and Laura Warner.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/wc347

Bebidas nutricionales suplementarias: Las necesito?

Las bebidas nutricionales suplementarias a menudo se usan en hospitales y hogares de adultos para ayudar a nutrir a quienes pueden comer mal y han perdido peso debido a una enfermedad o falta de apetito. Más recientemente, las bebidas nutricionales están disponibles para la compra de los consumidores. Ejemplos de bebidas o batidos nutricionales suplementarios comunes son Ensure® y Boost®. Esta publicación explora la pregunta que muchos adultos mayores se hacen: “¿Necesito bebidas nutricionales suplementarias?”
This new 3-page publication of the UF/IFAS Food Science and Human Nutrition Department is a Spanish translation of FSHN18-12/FS315, Supplemental Nutrition Drinks: Do I Need Them? Written by Claire Marie Fassett, Nancy J. Gal, and Wendy J. Dahl, and translated by Daniela Rivero Mendoza.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fs321

¿Cuantas comidas debo comer cada dia?

Figure 1. Food preparation area in the home kitchen

Comer de manera saludable no se trata tanto de la cantidad de comidas y meriendas consumidas, sino de los tipos y las cantidades de alimentos totales consumidos en un día. Tratar de cumplir con las porciones recomendadas de los cinco grupos de alimentos, es decir, frutas, verduras, granos, proteínas y productos lácteos ayudará a promover la buena salud y prevenir enfermedades.
This new 2-page publication of the UF/IFAS Food Science and Human Nutrition Department is the Spanish translation of FSHN18-10/FS313, How many meals should I eat each day? Written by Zainab Alyousif and Wendy Dahl, and translated by Daniela Rivero Mendoza.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fs319

Sal: ¿Debo recortar su consumo?

fs320

La sal alimentaria está compuesta de sodio y cloruro, dos minerales esenciales necesarios para una buena salud. El sodio es muy importante para nuestro cuerpo para mantener el equilibrio de líquidos, el volumen de sangre y la presión arterial. Sin embargo, muchas personas consumen más sodio en la dieta (de la sal) que lo que se necesita. La disminución de sodio en la dieta ha recibido mucha atención en los últimos años debido a la asociación del alto consumo de sodio en la dieta con hipertensión (presión arterial alta) y enfermedad cardiovascular. Esta publicación explora los efectos en la salud de la ingesta excesiva de sodio y las formas de disminuir la ingesta de este mineral.
This new 3-page publication of the UF/IFAS Food Science and Human Nutrition Department is the Spanish version of FSHN 18-9/FS312: Salt: Should I Cut Back? Written by Asmaa Fatani, Nancy J. Gal, and Wendy J. Dahl, and translated by Daniela Rivero Mendoza.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fs320

Culture de la vanille dans le sud de la Floride

Flowers of V. planifolia (top left), V. pompona (top center), V. phaeantha (top right), V. mexicana (bottom left), V dilloniana (bottom center), and V. barbellata (bottom right) growing in southern Florida.

L’extrait de vanille est populaire dans le monde entier comme ingrédient dans la crème glacée et divers autres desserts. La source botanique de l’extrait de vanille provient principalement des gousses durcies (préparées) de l’espèce Vanilla planifolia. Les États-Unis sont les plus grands importateurs mondiaux de gousses de vanille, mais la production nationale est très faible. Toutefois, le sud de la Floride a un potentiel de production favorable á la culture de la vanille. Ce document contient des informations utiles aux producteurs intéressés par l’établissement d’une vanillerie.
This is the French version of HS1348, Vanilla Cultivation in Southern Florida. This new 9-page publication was written by Alan Chambers, Pamela Moon, Vovener de Verlands Edmond, and Elias Bassil, translated by Francesca Carla Erié, and published by the UF/IFAS Horticultural Sciences Department.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1351

Cultivo de vainilla en el sur de Florida

Flowers of V. planifolia (top left), V. pompona (top center), V. phaeantha (top right), V. mexicana (bottom left), V dilloniana (bottom center), and V. barbellata (bottom right) growing in southern Florida.

El extracto de vainilla es popular en el mundo entero como un ingrediente usado en helados y otros postres. La fuente botánica del extracto de vainilla es principalmente los frijoles curados de Vanilla planifolia. El Estados Unidos es el mayor importador mundial de vainilla judías, pero la producción nacional es mínima. El sur de la Florida tiene un clima de crecimiento favorable para el cultivo de vainilla. Este documento incluye información relevante para los productores interesados en establecer un cultivo de vainilla.
This is the Spanish version of HS1348, Vanilla Cultivation in Southern Florida. This new 8-page publication was written by Alan Chambers, Pamela Moon, Vovener de Verlands Edmond, and Elias Bassil, translated by Dayana Valdes, and published by the UF/IFAS Horticultural Sciences Department.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1350