Meeting With Elected Officials

This 3-page document is one in a series on communicating with policymakers and elected officials, and discusses strategies for meeting with elected officials. Written by Ricky Telg and Shelli Rampold and published by the UF/IFAS Department of Agricultural Education and Communication, January 2019.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/wc318

Strategies for Engaging and Communicating with Elected Officials

This 5-page document is one in the series Communicating with Elected Officials. It details a strategy for those seeking to engage with elected officials. Written by Ricky W. Telg and Shelli D. Rampold and published by the UF/IFAS Department of Agricultural Education and Communication, December 2018.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/wc324

Recruiting and Retaining Members in Agricultural Organizations

Many organizations struggle with recruiting new members and retaining current members. The UF/IFAS PIE Center conducted membership surveys of the Florida Cattlemen’s Association and Florida CattleWomen to aid both groups in their membership efforts. This 3-page document discusses common membership barriers and practices in order to help agricultural organizations be better equipped to attract new members and keep current ones. Written by Ricky Telg and published by the UF/IFAS Department of Agricultural Education and Communication, March 2018.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/wc300

Differences in Perceptions of Agricultural Water Use between the General Public and Local Officials

John Cisar, a professor of Environmental Horticulture at the University of Florida's Fort Lauderdale Research and Education Center, is studying how turfgrass and other landscape plants can help prevent nitrogen from leaching through the soil into groundwater, Wednesday - Aug. 13, 2003. He said three years of research have shown that turfgrass is most effective in reducing nitrogen leaching and should be used in Florida landscapes. Other plants require more time to become established and slow nitrogen leaching through the soil.

Due to the scarcity of water resources among states and the influx of people, balancing agriculture and public water needs has become a contentious issue. Therefore, dialogue msut take place to educate and inform the general public and local officials about the reality of agricultural water use. This is the second article in a series describing the differences in perceptions of agricultural water use in Florida between the general public and local officials. This four-page fact sheet identifies the differens among groups for agricultural water use and provides ways to change Extension programming according to these differences. Written by Courtney T. Owens, Alexa J. Lamm, and Ricky W. Telg and published by the Department of Agricultural Education and Communication.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/wc249

Attitudes and Perceptions of Agricultural Water Use in Florida Expressed by the General Public and Local Officials

Lemon trees with micro irrigation system.  Photo Credits:  UF/IFAS Photo by Tyler Jones

The use of water has become increasingly contentious because an increased population is sharing a decreasing amount of water. Water remains Florida’s most plentiful natural resource but is at risk as the agriculture industry and Floridians demand more water for a variety of uses. This four-page fact sheet discusses the media’s influence on perceptions of agricultural water use, the measurement of attitudes and perception towards agricultural water use, and ways to educate the general public and local officials on this issue. Written by Courtney T. Owens, Alexa J. Lamm, and Ricky W. Telg, and published by the Department of Agricultural Education and Communication.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/wc248

How the General Public and Local Officials Prefer to Learn about Agricultural Water Use in Florida

Sprinklers watering athletic fields. UF/IFAS Phto by Tyler Jones.
Water is a precious resource that is invaluable to the state of Florida. The amount of water being used daily in the state is estimated at 14.3 million gallons. Part of a series dedicated to describing the preferred ways of learning about agricultural water use in Florida, this study can be used to assist Extension educators and the agricultural industry at large in the development of strategies meant to inform people about the realities of water use. This three-page fact sheet helps Extension educators understand preferred learning mediums so they can provide useful information about agricultural water use. Written by Courtney T. Owens, Alexa J. Lamm, and Ricky W. Telg and published by the Agricultural Education and Communication Department.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/wc247

Writing and Designing for the Web series

Hypertext transfer protocol

Knowing how to create and design a website is a valuable skill. This four-part series explains general tenants of good web design, covers the terminology and techniques involved in creating appealing, user-friendly websites, and also discusses basic HTML coding and developing visual elements for the web. Written by Ricky Telg, Laura Gorham, and Tracy Irani, and published by the UF Department of Agricultural Education and Communication, August 2015.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/topic_series_writing_and_designing_for_the_web

Teaching to Personality Types series

colorful people around a table
A person’s personality affects the way he or she learns best. Extension programs can use an understanding of different learning styles and preferences to reach the greatest number of people. This 4-part series covers the various personality types and explains how Extension can teach to these types. Written by Alexa J. Lamm and Ricky W. Telg, and published by the UF Department of Agricultural Education and Communication, September 2015. (Photo credit: Rawpixel Ltd/iStock/Thinkstock.com)
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/topic_series_teaching_to_personality_types

Letting Them In: Sharing Your Story with People outside of Your Industry

WC216 blurb photo
Those who work in agriculture often face the challenge of explaining their work to people outside of their field. Identifying what your audience cares about is the first step in formulating a story you audience will understand and value. This 3-page fact sheet also offers do’s and don’ts for crafting a story for non-expert audiences. Written by Brandon Telg, Jaron Jones, and Ricky Telg, and published by the UF Department of Agricultural Education and Communication, July 2015. (Photo credit: monkeybusinessimages/iStock/Thinkstock.com)
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/wc216

Story Development

WC215 blurb photo

Stories let you share who you are with the world. Storytelling can help develop an organization’s identity, improve interactions with the public, and foster teamwork. This 2-page fact sheet covers the basics of good storytelling and strategies for crafting an engaging story. Written by Brandon Telg, Jaron Jones, and Ricky Telg, and published by the UF Department of Agricultural Education and Communication, July 2015. (Photo credit: elwynn1130/iStock/Thinkstock.com)
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/wc215

Storytelling through Social Media

WC218 blurb photo

You and organization can use social media to tell you story and reach a large and diverse audience. This 3-page factsheet covers the major social media platforms, what each platform offers, and how to use theme effectively. Written by Brandon Telg, Jaron Jones, Ricky Telg, and Becky Raulerson, and published by the UF Department of Agricultural Education and Communication Department, July 2015.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/wc218

Face-to-Face Storytelling

WC217 blurb photo

In the agricultural industry, telling your story is critical for establishing your operation’s identity. Communicating face-to-face is one method of getting your message to the public. This 2-page fact sheet presents tips and strategies for delivering your story to a live audience. Written by Brandon Telg, Jaron Jones, and Ricky Telg, and published by the UF Department of Agricultural Education and Communication, July 2015.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/wc217

Using Heat Maps to Determine the Usability of Extension Communication Materials

WC198This heat map from a website usability test shows that more people click on the banana image than anywhere else on the computer screen, followed by the button at the top of the screenshot. This tool allows Extension faculty to determine the ease of respondent use of the communication material. This 6-page fact sheet explains how to use heat maps and how to develop heat map questions in Qualtrics. Written by Laura M. Gorham, Shuyang Qu, Ricky Telg, and Alexa Lamm, and published by the UF Department of Agricultural Education and Communication, February 2015.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/wc198

Conducting Interviews for News Stories

Reporter interviewing soldierIn order to write a good news story for print, television, or radio, you have to conduct interviews with the people who have the information you need. An interview is the process of asking good questions so you can get good answers for your news story. This 3-page fact sheet provides some tips to follow as you conduct a news story interview. Written by Ricky Telg, and published by the UF Department of Agricultural Education and Communication, January 2015. (Photo: VStock/Thinkstock.com)
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/wc194

News Writing for Television and Radio

Figure 1. UF/IFAS video shoot for Gardening in a MinuteCreating a television or radio story is more than hitting “record” on a video camera or audio recorder. You have to learn the process of writing an effective television and radio news story first. This 4-page fact sheet was written by Ricky Telg, and published by the UF Department of Agricultural Education and Communication, January 2015.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/wc193

Grammar and Punctuation

Hand with Red Pen Proofreading Text CloseupAny news story should be as free of grammar and punctuation errors as possible. Grammar is a system of rules that defines the use of the language. Most of the grammar and punctuation rules you have learned in school will be the same when using Associated Press Style, but there are some differences. This 4-page fact sheet covers some common grammatical and punctuation issues for journalists. Written by Ricky Telg, and published by the UF Department of Agricultural Education and Communication, January 2015. (Photo: iStock/Thinkstock)
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/wc192

News Writing for Print

inverted pyramid structureA good print news story will contain the following components: inverted pyramid structure, five Ws and H, leads, impersonal reporting, news writing techniques, quotations and attributions, Associated Press Style, and proper grammar and punctuation. This 5-page fact sheet was written by Ricky Telg, and published by the UF Department of Agricultural Education and Communication, January 2015.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/wc191

News Media Writing

Figure 1. ScriptwritingKnowing how to write in a news media style is important not only for an organization’s reporters, but also for its members. This 2-page fact sheet provides an overview of news writing for print, television, and radio to help you better communicate news about what is going on in your organization. Written by Ricky Telg, and published by the UF Department of Agricultural Education and Communication, January 2015.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/wc190

Improving Extension Program Development Using Audience Segmentation

Sliced orange, juice, fruit, nutrition. UF/IFAS photo Marisol AmadorDeveloping an impactful Extension program depends on acquiring a deep understanding of the audience’s specific needs and preferences. Audience segmentation allows an agent to address the variability among Extension clientele, in order to deliver the programming and messages that are most meaningful to an audience/clientele segment. This 5-page fact sheet was written by Paul Monaghan, Laura Warner, Ricky Telg and Tracy Irani, and published by the UF Department of Agricultural Education and Communication, November 2014. (UF/IFAS photo Marisol Amador)
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/wc188

Persuasion as a Communication Tool

concept of educationThink about a time when you wanted your parents to do something for you, such as buy you a special birthday gift, let you stay up late, or go out with your friends. Your attempts at persuasion probably focused on communicating specific reasons why your parents should take the action you wanted. Persuasion is a communication tool that can be adjusted to convince a single person, or to move an entire audience to a desired action. In this publication you will learn several techniques for persuasive communication. This 2-page fact sheet was written by Laura Gorham, Ricky Telg, and Tracy Irani, and published by the UF Department of Agricultural Education and Communication, July 2013.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/wc144