Integrated Management of Non-Native Plants in Natural Areas of Florida

Air potato. Invasive yam species, perennial vine, poison plants. UF/IFAS Photo: Thomas Wright.

While natural areas are conservation lands that have been set aside for the purpose of preserving (or restoring) native plant and animal communities, they do require active management. One of the greatest management issues in natural areas is invasive plants. This 35-page publication provides land managers in Florida with current methods used to manage non-native plants. Written by Stephen F. Enloe, Ken Langeland, Jason Ferrell, Brent Sellers, and Greg MacDonald, and published by the UF/IFAS Agronomy Department, revised July 2018.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/wg209

Key Plant, Key Pests: Chinese Fringe (Loropetalum chinense)

This 3-page document is one in the Key Plant, Key Pests series. It helps identify common pests found on the Chinese fringe. Written by Juanita Popenoe, Caroline R. Warwick, and Jianjun Chen and published by the UF/IFAS Environmental Horticulture Department, July 2018.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep562

Stinging and Venomous Caterpillars of the Southeast

io moth caterpillar Automeris io

Wasp and bee stings are familiar to most people, but some might be surprised to learn that several caterpillars can also sting. Unlike wasps and bees with stingers, these caterpillars have barbed hairs that break off the caterpillar when it brushes against something. The hairs embed in skin and cause sudden or gradually building pain. The severity of a caterpillar sting varies based on the person and number of spines in the skin. Many stinging caterpillars also release a toxin on contact, which may cause health problems for some people. This 4-page fact sheet written by Rebecca Perry and Adam Dale and published by the UF/IFAS Department of Entomology and Nematology describes several stinging caterpillars commonly found throughout the southeastern United States.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/in014

Feral Swine Trapping: Techniques and Designs

Feral hogs resemble domestic hogs, but are usually leaner

Feral swine are an invasive or nuisance species in Florida and most other states because their incessant rooting is ruinous to natural and agricultural habitat. They loosen the soil, destroy native vegetation, and modify the natural chemistry and nutrients of the soil, causing widespread destruction in natural ecosystems, agricultural areas, livestock pastures, and residential areas. They also carry numerous diseases, some of which are transmittable to wild and domestic animals and humans. Trapping and removing swine from your property is an effective way to reduce or control feral swine populations. This 9-page fact sheet written by Bethany Wight and Raoul K. Boughton and published by the UF/IFAS Wildlife Ecology and Conservation Department describes the most commonly used trapping techniques and illustrates several trap and gate designs.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/uw440

Best Practices for Scalloping: From the Boat to Your Plate

scallops on ice Tommy Thompson

Recreational scalloping in Florida is a popular group activity for many residents and visitors throughout the summer months. This 6-page fact sheet written by Brittany Hall-Scharf, Sarah Ellis, and Savanna Barry and published by the UF/IFAS Florida Sea Grant College Program lists the legal requirements for boating and scalloping, provides a safety plan to minimize and/or prevent accidents while you’re out on the water, and explains proper shucking methods to ensure that the meals you make from your catch will be safe and delicious.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/sg158

Key Plant, Key Pests: Crapemyrtle (Lagerstroemia)

This 4-page document is one in the Key Plant, Key Pests series. It helps identify pests found on the crapemyrtle, one of the most common landscape plants in north and central Florida. Written by Juanita Popenoe, Caroline R. Warwick, and Chris Marble and published by the UF/IFAS Environmental Horticulture Department, June 2018.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep560

Key Plant, Key Pests: Camellia

This 7-page document is one in the Key Plant, Key Pests series. It discusses identification and management of pests found on the camellia, a flowering plant common in Southern landscapes. Written by Juanita Popenoe, Caroline R. Warwick, and Brian Pearson and published by the UF/IFAS Environmental Horticulture Department, June 2018.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep558

Key Plant, Key Pests: Baldcypress (Taxodium distichum)

This 4-page document is one in the Key Plant, Key Pests series. It provides information on the management of common pests found on baldcypress. Written by Juanita Popenoe, Caroline R. Warwick, and Roger Kjelgren and published by the UF/IFAS Environmental Horticulture Department, June 2018.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep557

A Brief Summary of the Water Bill, SB 552

suburban landscape

This 5-page document written by Lisa Krimsky, Andrea Albertin, Charles Barrett, James Fletcher, and Mary Lusk and published by the UF/IFAS Program in Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences of the School of Forest Resources and Conservation is intended to act as a quick reference guide and is not inclusive of all measures in SB 552. This summary addresses the Florida Springs and Aquifer Protection Act, the Central Florida Water Initiative, Northern Everglades and Estuaries Protection, and Pilot Programs for Alternative Water Supply.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fa205

Bed Fishing for Florida Bass

Florida bass guarding fry

Florida bass, Micropterus floridanus, is the most popular freshwater sport fish in the state of Florida. Florida bass guard their nests for up to 2 weeks, and many anglers target the prized sport fish during this period using a procedure called bed fishing. This 7-page fact sheet written by John S. Hargrove and James D. Austin and published by the UF/IFAS School of Forest Resources and Conservation, Program in Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences, outlines the reproductive biology of Florida bass, the known consequences of bed fishing, and practices to minimize its impacts.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fa204

Cat’s-Claw Vine, Dolichandra unguis-cati : A Showy but Invasive Plant in Florida


Cat’s-claw vine is a neotropical, climbing perennial that produces large and showy yellow flowers in the springtime. Unfortunately, the aggressive nature of the vine has made it a major weed in China, Australia, South Africa, and parts of the southeastern United States. This 6-page fact sheet written by Niels Proctor and Jason Smith and published by the UF/IFAS School of Forest Resources and Conservation provides guidance on identification and control of this invasive vine and suggests some similar native vines to use instead.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fr391

Recreational Harvesting of the Florida Bay Scallop: Taylor County

This useful brochure includes a full-color map identifying access routes to the boat ramps and marinas in southern Taylor County near Steinhatchee and Keaton Beach plus the latest information on scallops and scalloping, the recommended equipment you will want to bring, and a few tasty recipes for preparing Florida’s best summertime catch. Written by Victor Blanco and published by the UF/IFAS Extension Florida Sea Grant College Program.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/sg146

Recreational Harvest of the Florida Bay Scallop: Hernando County

scallop in hand UF/IFAS

This useful brochure written by Brittany Hall-Scharf and published by the UF/IFAS Florida Sea Grant College Program includes a full-color map identifying access routes to the boat ramps and marinas in Hernando County. Also find the latest information on scallops and scalloping, the recommended equipment you will want to bring, and a few tasty recipes for preparing Florida’s best summertime catch.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/sg148

How Ornamental Fishes Get Their Color

clownfish UF/IFAS

Color in fish is mostly genetically determined, but they are unable to produce red, orange, yellow, green, and some blue colors themselves.They get these colors from their food. Fish raised in aquariums or recirculating water systems without pigment supplementation in their diet will fade and lose their vibrant hues. Even in ponds, dietary pigment supplementation can make fishes brighter and more variably colored, just like their wild counterparts. This 6-page fact sheet written by F. A. Chapman and R. D. Miles and published by the UF/IFAS School of Forest Resources and Conservation, Program in Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences, addresses how ornamental fish get their colors and provides a list of ingredient sources for diets that can be used to enhance and intensify fish colors.

http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fa192

Recreational Harvesting of the Florida Bay Scallop: Wakulla County

Florida bay scallop abstract

This handy brochure includes a full-color map identifying access routes to the boat ramps and marinas in Wakulla County, plus the latest information on scallops and scalloping, the recommended equipment you will want to bring, and a few tasty recipes for preparing Florida’s best summertime catch. Written by Savanna Barry and published by the UF/IFAS Extension Florida Sea Grant College Program.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/sg149

Recreational Harvesting of the Florida Bay Scallop: Citrus County

Florida bay scallop eyes

This handy brochure written by Savanna Barry and published by the UF/IFAS Florida Sea Grant College Program includes a full-color map identifying access routes to the boat ramps and marinas in Citrus County near Homosassa and Crystal River, plus the latest information on scallops and scalloping, the recommended equipment you will want to bring, and a few tasty recipes for preparing Florida’s best summertime catch.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/sg147

Recreational Harvesting of the Florida Bay Scallop: Pasco County

Florida bay scallops

This useful brochure written by Brittany Hall-Scharf and published by the UF/IFAS Extension Florida Sea Grant College Program includes a full-color map identifying access routes to the boat ramps and marinas in Pasco County, plus the latest information on scallops and scalloping, the recommended equipment you will want to bring, and a few tasty recipes for preparing Florida’s best summertime catch.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/sg157

Pest Identification Guide: Solanum (Pepper) Whitefly, Aleurotrachelus trachoides

A pile of harvested bell peppers. UF/IFAS Photo by Tyler Jones

Considered an emerging pest in Florida, the solanum whitefly has been in the state since at least the 1960s. It eats pepper, eggplant, and tomato, as well as other food crops, ornamental plants, and weeds. Learn to identify the little pest with this handy, 2-page guide written by Nicole A. Casuso and Hugh A. Smith and published by the UF/IFAS Entomology and Nematology Department.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/in1201

Frogs and Toads of Northern Belize

Red-eyed treefrog (Agalychnis callidryas) Mike Rochford, UF/IFAS

Belize is home to several threatened frog species. One of them, the Maya mountains frog, lives nowhere else in the world. This 4-page fact sheet written by Jenna M. Cole, Sarah K. Cooke, Venetia S. Briggs-Gonzalez, Justin R. Dalaba, and Frank J. Mazzotti and published by the UF/IFAS Wildlife Ecology and Conservation Department will help you identify your frogs and toads in order to better protect them.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/uw439

Wax Moth Control

Honeycomb with honey bees on it. Photo taken on 03-10-17. Camilla Guillen UF/IFAS

The greater wax moth (Galleria mellonella Linnaeus) and lesser wax moth (Achroia grisella Fabricius) are major pests of honey bee colonies in Florida. The best defense against wax moths in living colonies is keeping colonies otherwise strong, free of diseases and pests, and queenright. Controlling wax moths in stored combs and equipment, however, can be more difficult. This 3-page fact sheet written by Cameron J. Jack and Jamie D. Ellis and published by the UF/IFAS Department of Entomology and Nematology details the steps beekeepers can take to control wax moths and keep them from ruining stored honey bee combs and equipment.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/aa141