Stinging and Venomous Caterpillars of the Southeast

io moth caterpillar Automeris io

Wasp and bee stings are familiar to most people, but some might be surprised to learn that several caterpillars can also sting. Unlike wasps and bees with stingers, these caterpillars have barbed hairs that break off the caterpillar when it brushes against something. The hairs embed in skin and cause sudden or gradually building pain. The severity of a caterpillar sting varies based on the person and number of spines in the skin. Many stinging caterpillars also release a toxin on contact, which may cause health problems for some people. This 4-page fact sheet written by Rebecca Perry and Adam Dale and published by the UF/IFAS Department of Entomology and Nematology describes several stinging caterpillars commonly found throughout the southeastern United States.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/in014

Florida-Friendly Landscaping Guidelines for Community Associations: Considerations for Selecting a Landscape Contractor and Writing an Effective Landscaping Contract

Figure 1. Any homeowner can independently adopt the Florida-Friendly Landscaping practices as long as they are consistent with HOA requirements and other restrictions. Credit: Michael Gutierrez, UF/IFAS

Florida-Friendly Landscaping protects Florida’s unique natural resources by conserving water, reducing waste and pollution, creating wildlife habitat, and preventing erosion. This 12-page document will help the reader with selecting and writing a landscape contract that follows Florida-Friendly Landscaping principles. Written by Adam Dale, Claire Lewis, Esen Momol, Don Rainey, John Bossart, C. J. Bain, Jen Marvin, Lynn Barber, Norman Leppla, Gary Knox, and Thomas T. Ankerson and published by the UF/IFAS Environmental Horticulture Department, June 2018.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep347

Managing Whiteflies on Landscape Ornamentals

adult citrus whitefly, D. citri. Lyle Buss.

Whiteflies are a common pest of many ornamental plants throughout Florida and the world. There are more than 1,500 species worldwide and over 75 reported in Florida. Although infestation does not always require treatment, it is important to be able to identify and monitor for these pests for effective integrated pest management. This 8-page fact sheet written by Eileen A. Buss, Catharine Mannion, Lance Osborne, and Adam Dale and published by the Entomology and Nematology Department describes whitefly species, their identification and biology, the damage they cause, and best management practices to control them and still maintain healthy populations of natural enemies and other beneficial insects.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/mg254

Managing Scale Insects and Mealybugs on Turfgrass

Dimargarodes meridionalis adult female

This 8-page fact sheet written by Adam Dale and published by the UF Department of Entomology and Nematology in February 2017 describes the types of scale insects and mealybugs that can become pests in turf, explains the damage they do, and lists management techniques to control them.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/in1166

Managing Scale Insects on Ornamental Plants

Gloomy scale, Melanaspis tenebricosa, with armored covering removed

Scale insects are a diverse group of piercing-sucking pests (Hemiptera) commonly found on ornamental plants in landscapes and nurseries. There are over 180 species of scale insects in Florida, but only a small percentage are important pests of ornamental plants. They damage plants and secrete a waxy covering that makes them difficult to control using most chemical control measures. This 7-page fact sheet written by Eileen A. Buss and Adam Dale and published by the Department of Entomology and Nematology differentiates between armored and soft-scale insect pests and lists common types of each, provides information about the biology of scale insects and how to identify them and the damage they cause, describes how to scout and monitor for scale insects, and lists several methods for prevention and control of scale insect invasions.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/mg005