Biologia y Manejo de Nostoc (Cyanobacteria) en Viveros y Invernadores

Image of Nostoc macroscopic colony commonly found in the field on sandy and limestone ground.

Este artículo es escrito para ayudar el lector a entender la biología y ecología de Nostoc, un género común de cianobacteria (alga verdeazulada) de suelos húmidos, y proporcionar métodos para manejar esta plaga en viveros. This 4-page document is the Spanish version of Biology and Management of Nostoc (Cyanobacteria) in Nurseries and Greenhouses. Written by H. Dail Laughinghouse IV, David E. Berthold, Chris Marble, and Debalina Saha, and published by the UF/IFAS Agronomy Department, April 2019.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ag432

Biology and Management of Spanish Needles (Bidens spp.) in Ornamental Crop Production

Bidens alba flower

All eight species of Bidens in Florida are commonly referred to as Spanish needles or beggar-ticks. This document focuses on Bidens alba and B. pilosa, which are common weeds in container nurseries and landscapes in Florida. This 6-page EDIS publication, written by Yuvraj Khamare, Chris Marble, Shawn Steed, and Nathan Boyd and published by the UF/IFAS Environmental Horticulture Department, is designed for landowners, gardeners, horticulturalists, and consumers hoping to learn more about Spanish needle classification and management.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep572

Biology and Management of Nostoc (Cyanobacteria) in Nurseries and Greenhouses

Image of Nostoc macroscopic colony commonly found in the field on sandy and limestone ground.

This new 4-page document provides an overview of the biology and ecology of Nostoc-like cyanobacteria (blue-green algae) in humid soils and discusses cultural, physical, and chemical methods to manage this weed in nursery environments. Written by H. Dail Laughinghouse IV, David E. Berthold, Chris Marble, and Debalina Saha, and published by the UF/IFAS Agronomy Department, February 2019.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ag430

Biology and Management of Yellow (Cyperus escuelentus) and Purple Nutsedge (C. rotundus) in Ornamental Crop Production and Landscapes

Yellow nutsedge inflorescence (left) and purple nutsedge inflorescence (right).

This new six-page document provides insight on characteristics and management techniques for both yellow and purple nutsedge, prevalent and persistent weeds in Florida. Written by Debalina Saha, Chris Marble, Nathan Boyd, and Shawn Steed and published by the UF/IFAS Environmental Horticulture Department, March 2019.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep569

Key Plant, Key Pests: Pine Species (Pinus sp.)

This 6-page document is one in the Key Plant, Key Pests series. It helps identify the most common pests found on pine species. Written by Juanita Popenoe, Jacqueline Bourdon, Caroline R. Warwick, and Chris Marble and published by the UF/IFAS Environmental Horticulture Department, December 2018.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep565

Key Plant, Key Pests: Crapemyrtle (Lagerstroemia)

This 4-page document is one in the Key Plant, Key Pests series. It helps identify pests found on the crapemyrtle, one of the most common landscape plants in north and central Florida. Written by Juanita Popenoe, Caroline R. Warwick, and Chris Marble and published by the UF/IFAS Environmental Horticulture Department, June 2018.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep560

Biology and Management of Dodder (Cuscuta spp.) in Ornamental Crop Production and Landscape

Dodder are a group of over 150 species in the genus Cuscuta. This 4-page publication was developed to help commercial growers, landscape professionals, and homeowners identify and manage dodder infestations in their greenhouses, nurseries, or landscapes. Written by Kaley Mierek, Chris Marble, Nathan Boyd, and Shawn Steed and published by the UF/IFAS Environmental Horticulture Department, May 2018.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep556

Biology and Management of Liverwort (Marchantia polymorpha) in Ornamental Crop Production

Liverwort is a common weed problem in production nurseries and greenhouses. This article has been written to help growers identify liverwort, understand its biology, and inform them of ways this weed can be managed in their operation. Written by Chris Marble, Marc S. Frank, Dail Laughinghouse, Shawn Steed, and Nathan Boyd, and published by UF’s Environmental Horticulture Department, September 2017.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep542

Biology and Management of Goosegrass (Eleusine indica (L.) Gaertn.) in Ornamental Plant Production

Figure 4. Seed head Credits: Nathan S. Boyd, UF/IFAS

This six-page fact sheet provides information about the biology and management of goosegrass, including preemergence and postemergence control options. Written by Shawn Steed, Christopher Marble, Nathan S. Boyd, Andrew MacRae, and Kiran Fnu and published by the Environmental Horticulture Department.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep538

Biology and Management of Thickhead (Crassocephalum crepidioides) in Ornamental Crop Production

Figure 2. Thickhead cotyledon and first true leaf. Credits: Annette Chandler, UF/IFAS Mid-Florida Research and Education Center

Typically found in shadehouses and shaded areas of nursery production, thickhead grows aggressively in containers and can outcompete nursery crops for water, nutrients, and light. This erect, sparingly branched, herbaceous annual, grows up to 4 feet tall and germinates over a wide range of pH, salt, and temperature conditions. This four-page fact sheet describes thickhead (Crassocephalum crepidioides) and various methods for its control in ornamental crop production. Written by Allison Bechtloff, Shawn Steed, Chris Marble, and Nathan Boyd and published by the Environmental Horticulture Department.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep534

Biology and Management of Pilea microphylla(Artillery weed) in Ornamental Crop Production

Figure 4. Artillery weed in flower. Credits: Annette Chandler, UF/IFAS

This five-page fact sheet describes the biology and management of Pilea microphylla, or artillery weed, for ornamental crop production. Artillery weed occurs primarily in moist, disturbed areas and is thought to be native to South America and parts of North America. It is found throughout Florida. Written by Debalina Saha, Chris Marble, Shawn Steed, and Nathan Boyd and published by the Environmental Horticulture Department.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep535

Herbicidas Postemergentes para Uso en Ornamentales

Rose specimens infected with rose rosette virus. Photo taken on 10-3-15  Photo Credits:  UF/IFAS Photo by Tyler Jones
This is the Spanish language version of ENH95/WG095 Postemergent Herbicides for Use in Ornamentals http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/wg059 Postemergent herbicides are applied directly to weeds. This 5-page fact sheet is largely comprised of two tables: Table one lists postemergent herbicides that can be safely used over the top of some ornamentals when used according to label directions; table 2 lists postemergent herbicides that are registered for use around ornamental plants when applied as a directed spray. Written by E. Vanesssa Campoverde, Chris Marble, and Jeffrey G. Norcini and published by the Environmental Horticulture Department.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep533

Biology and Management of American Black Nightshade (Solanum americanum P. Mill.) in Tomato, Pepper, Cucurbit, and Strawberry

Figure 2. American black nightshade leaf (left) and stem (right). Credits: Nathan S. Boyd, UF/IFAS

This three-page fact sheet describes the biology and management of American black nightshade, explaining how to control for it in tomato and pepper, cucurbits, and strawberry. Written by Nathan S. Boyd, Shawn Steed, Chris Marble, and Andrew MacRae and published by the Horticultural Sciences Department.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1176

Biology and Management of Ragweed Parthenium (Parthenium hysterophorous L.) in Ornamental Crop Production

Figure 1. Ragweed parthenium growing in a pot. Note the upright growth habit and the basal rosette leaves. Credits: Annette Chandler, UF/IFAS

This six-page fact sheet provides an overview of Ragweed Parthenium, Parthenium hysterophorous L, including a species description and information on how to manage ragweed parthenium culturally, physically, and chemically. Written by Debalina Saha, Chris Marble, Robert H. Stamps, and Shawn Steed and published by the Environmental Horticulture Department.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep531

Biology and Management of Goosegrass (Eleusine indica (L.) Gaertn.) in Tomatoes, Peppers, Cucurbits, and Strawberries

Figure 2. Goosegrass seedling (left) and mat-like rosette (right). Credits: Nathan S. Boyd, UF/IFAS

This four-page fact sheet gives a brief description of the biology and management of goosegrass, a common annual turf and horticultural weed found throughout Florida that grows well in compact, wet soils and superficially resembles crabgrasses. Written by Nathan S. Boyd, Kiran Fnu, Chris Marble, Shawn Steed, and Andrew W. MacRae and published by the Horticultural Sciences Department.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1178

Metsulfuron-Methyl-Containing Herbicides Potentially Damaging Ornamentals when Applied to Turfgrass

Figure 1. Phloem necrosis shown as streaking brown sections of wood exposed by peeling the bark back in a live oak (Quercus virginiana) branch affected by metsulfuron-methyl. Credits: Jason Smith, UF/IFAS
Metsulfuron-methyl, also known as MSM, is an herbicide that is used to control broadleaf weeds and certain grass weeds. It provides effective control of some of the most problematic turfgrass weeds, such as wild garlic, Florida betony, dollar weed, and small Virginia buttonweed. Metsulfuron-methyl is absorbed by plant foliage, so if landscape plants come into contact with the spray or drift they can be injured. This four-page fact sheet describes the potential problems with metsulfuron herbicides, the areas most subsceptible to damage, how to diagnose injury, and how to reduce damage. Written by Chris Marble, Jason Smith, Timothy K. Broschat, Adam Black, Ed Gilman, and Celeste White and published by the School of Forest Resources and Conservation Department.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fr400

Weed Control for Ornamentals inside Greenhouses and Other Enclosed Structures

Figure 2. Close-up of mulberry weed (Fatoua villosa), which can harbor whiteflies and other insects.
Maintaining a weed-free greenhouse is important for producing healthy and marketable crops. Weeds will compete with crops for water, light, and nutrients. Weeds can find favorable conditions for growth in gravel and along edges, tears, and worn areas of ground cloth. It is important to frequently scout for weeds. This five-page fact sheet describes both chemical methods of controlling weeds, but also non-chemical methods, such as sanitation and prevention, hand weeding, and cultural control practices. Written by Chris Marble and Jeremy Pickens, and published by the Environmental Horticulture Department.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep528

Improving Weed Control in Landscape Planting Beds

Coarse pine bark nuggets and other mulch materials can help to suppress weed germination and growth in landscape planting beds.

Because landscape beds often contain a variety of ornamental plants, shrubs, and trees, using herbicides to control weeds in these areas can be challenging; however, non-herbicidal methods can be labor intensive. This 6-page fact sheet outlines how to use landscape design and cultural and chemical practices to effectively control weeds in landscape beds. This publication also discusses the use of pre- and postemergent herbicides. Written by Chris Marble and Andrew Koeser, and published by the UF Department of Environmental Horticulture, June 2015.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep523

Biology and Management of Graceful Sandmat (Chamaesyce hypericifolia) in Ornamental Crop Production

Graceful sandmat inflorescence.

Graceful sandmat (Chamaesyce hypericifolia) is a problematic weed that often grows in container media in ornamental plant nurseries. This 4-page facts sheet profiles the biology of graceful sandmat and recommends physical, cultural, and chemicals methods for managing the weed in the nursery environment. Written by Theresa Chormanski, Chris Marble, and Lyn Gettys, and published by the UF Department of Environmental Horticulture, June 2015.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep522

Biology and Management of Long-Stalked Phyllanthus in Ornamental Crop Production

Figure 3. Long-stalked phyllanthus in flower.

This 5-page fact sheet discusses the characteristics of long-stalked phyllanthus and explains how to control its growth in a nursery environment. Written by Theresa Chormanski, Chris Marble, and Lyn Gettys, and published by the UF Department of Environmental Horticulture, April 2015.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep518