The Passion Fruit in Florida

Passion fruit cross section, showing juice-filled arils and black seeds. Credits: Mark Bailey, UF/IFAS

Passion fruit is a short-lived evergreen perennial vine that produces an aromatic and tropical-tasting fruit. This new 13-page publication of the UF/IFAS Horticultural Sciences Department provides a description of passion fruit and its various species and cultivars, as well as a guide to culture and management, harvest and storage, its pests and diseases, and food and marketing. Written by Mark Bailey, Ali Sarkhosh, Amir Rezazadeh, Joshua Anderson, Alan Chambers, and Jonathan Crane.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1406

Downy Mildew of Lettuce in Florida

Rows of research lettuce at the EREC in Belle Glade. Photo taken 10-22-15 by Tyler Jones.

Lettuce Downy Mildew (LDM), caused by the oomycete Bremia lactucae, is the most important disease of lettuce worldwide. LDM has a direct effect on both yield quantity and quality because it may infect lettuce at any growth stage, affecting the marketable portion of the crop. This new 6-page publication of the UF/IFAS Horticultural Sciences Department introduces the LDM disease in Florida lettuce and available control methods and strategies. This publication also introduces the work on LDM in the UF/IFAS Lettuce Breeding Program, which was created to release cultivars adapted to Florida conditions. Written by Lis Rodrigues-Porto, Richard N. Raid, and Germán V. Sandoya.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1403

Use of Recycled Potting Medium for Containerized Production of Squash

The different potting medium treatments tested in the study. Credits: Marie Dorval, UF/IFAS

Vegetable growers are keen on cost-cutting measures to increase profitability. Containerized vegetable production can be done in a shade-house or garden, and it often requires commercial potting media. Although expensive, potting media are lightweight and provide high water- and nutrient-holding capacities, and thus they are widely used by growers. Growers often discard or compost the potting media after a single season due to issues such as diseases, pests, and weeds. However, old potting media could be reused for containerized production if appropriately sterilized and amended with fertilizer salts. The current study was conducted to determine the feasibility of using sterilized recycled potting medium amended with fertilizer salts for containerized production of squash. This new 4-page publication of the UF/IFAS Horticultural Sciences Department was written by Marie Dorval, Riphine Mainviel, Vincent Michael, Yuqing Fu, Bala Rathinasabapathi, and Geoffrey Meru.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1404

Transitioning from Conventional to Organic Farming Using Conservation Tillage

Organic corn planted in a cover crop of roller-crimped rye and hairy vetch.

Organic farming is one of the fastest-growing segments of the agricultural industry in the United States and in Florida. Conservation tillage is often employed to reduce soil erosion, improve physical and biological properties of soil, and increase water use efficiency. This 5-page article aims to provide recommendations to row crop farmers who wish to implement conservation tillage practices during their transition to a certified organic system. Written by D. L. Wright, J. Moyer, D. Treadwell, I. M. Small, and S. George, and published by the UF/IFAS Agronomy Department, revised November 2020.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ag246

Organic Blueberry Production in Florida

Patricia blueberry variety. Photo taken 04-24-18 Photo Credits: UF/IFAS Photo by Tyler Jones

There is a growing market in the United States and globally for fresh fruits and vegetables with reported health-enhancing properties. This includes blueberries, which are high in antioxidants and have been reported to improve heart health and contain anticancer properties. Fresh-market blueberry sales (conventional and organic) increased by 27% between 2013 and 2017, and that trend is expected to continue. In addition, there is an increasing level of consumer interest in organically grown produce (for environmental conservation, taste, and other perceived benefits), for which some consumers are willing to pay a premium over the price for a conventionally produced crop. This new 8-page publication of the UF/IFAS Horticultural Sciences Department discusses various aspects of organic blueberry production in Florida and is intended for use by those currently using or interested in pursuing organic production. Written by Douglas A. Phillips, Peter J. Dittmar, Philip F. Harmon, Oscar E. Liburd, Danielle D. Treadwell, and Jeffrey G. Williamson.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1400

Chinese Mustard Cultivation Guide for Florida

Chinese mustard and finely chopped ginger root served in a salad mix (left) and stir-fried with oil (right). Credit: Guodong Liu, UF/IFAS

Chinese mustard is a nutritious leafy vegetable in the family Brassicaceae. Chinese mustard also goes by many common names, such as brown mustard, mustard greens, leaf mustard, Indian mustard, Oriental mustard, and vegetable mustard. Although it is considered a weed in a few states, such as Michigan, this species is not listed as invasive in Florida and has been cultivated in several counties, including Levy, Palm Beach, and Miami-Dade. This new 8-page publication of the UF/IFAS Horticultural Sciences Department provides a short cultivation guide as well as information on the uses and marketability of Chinese mustard. Written by Yuheng Qiu, Mary Dixon, and Guodong Liu.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1402

Prácticas Culturales para el Caqui Japonés en Florida

Chinche hedionda en el fruto del caqui. (UF/IFAS)

Los caquis son considerados como un cultivo relativamente sostenible en Florida, con una calificación de 6 puntos en una escala de 10 para la evaluación de sostenibilidad agrícola. Los caquis tienen un potencial comercial moderado y altas probabilidades de llegar directamente al consumidor. La demanda de los consumidores podría ser de cultivares no astringentes principalmente. Los caquis son aptos para el centro y el norte de Florida, ya que la calidad y los rendimientos pueden ser bajos en la parte sur del estado.
This new 15-page publication of the UF/IFAS Horticultural Sciences Department is the Spanish translation of HS1389, Japanese Persimmon Cultural Practices in Florida, written by Ali Sarkhosh, Dustin M. Huff, and Peter C. Andersen, and translated by Jonathan Clavijo-Herrera.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1401

Crop Water Use and Irrigation Scheduling Guide for North Florida

Rows of peanuts ready to be harvested. Photo taken 08-22-19.

Effective irrigation scheduling enables the irrigator to apply the right amount of water at the right time to meet the crop water demand. This 19-page guide presents information on average daily and weekly crop water use and crop growth stages for twelve north Florida crops that can be used to help schedule irrigation. This will allow a grower to develop a realistic irrigation schedule that minimizes plant water stress, saves water, and reduces nutrient leaching potential. Written by Vivek Sharma, Charles Barrett, De Broughton, and Thomas Obreza, and published by the UF/IFAS Department of Soil and Water Sciences, revised December 2020.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ss491

Boom Sprayer Calibration Tables

Rows of peanuts ready to be harvested. Photo taken 08-22-19.

This 13-page publication is meant to make calibration of boom sprayers easier, and therefore more common, by providing a convenient chart that can be kept in barns, tractor cabs, sprayers, and mix-load facilities for quick reference. Written by Michael J. Mulvaney, Pratap Devkota, Ethan Carter, De Broughton, and Mark Mauldin, and published by the UF/IFAS Agronomy Department, November 2020.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ag446

Pintoi Peanut: A Seed-Propagated Perennial Peanut Forage Option for Florida

Pintoi peanut stolons (runners) growing parallel to the soil surface.

Because of its adaptability to Florida's environmental conditions and ability to produce viable seeds, pintoi peanut represents an interesting forage alternative for cow-calf producers in the state. This 5-page document provides current information on pintoi peanut for forage and livestock producers in Florida. Written by Joao M. D. Sanchez, Joao Vendramini, Maria L. Silveira, Jose C. B. Dubeux Jr., Lynn E. Sollenberger, and Philipe Moriel, and published by the UF/IFAS Agronomy Department, November 2020.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ag445

Programacion de Riego Basado en el Metodo de Evapotranspiracion Para Papaya (Carica papaya) en Florida

Fruiting papaya trees at the Tropical Research and Education Center in Homestead, FL. UF/IFAS Photo: Thomas Wright

La papaya es un importante cultivo frutícola que se cultiva en el sur de Florida con un área estimada de 356 acres. Este documento se centra en las técnicas de programación de riego basadas en ET para la papaya en las condiciones de Florida. Written by Haimanote K. Bayabil, Jonathan H. Crane, Kati W. Migliaccio, Yuncong Li, Fredy Ballen, and Sandra Guzmán, and published by the UF/IFAS Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering, November 2020.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ae547

How Are Our Future Agriculture and Natural Resources Projected under Varying Climate?

Storm rising over a farm.

This 8-page article explains how agriculture and natural resources may respond to projected future climate and how climate projections can be useful in developing management plans for the improved sustainability of Florida's agriculture and natural resources. It also aims to help increase the public awareness of climate change impacts on Florida and improve understanding of the connections among climate, agriculture, and natural resources. Written by Young Gu Her, Ashley Smyth, Zachary Brym, and Elias Bassil, and published by the UF/IFAS Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering, September 2020.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ae545

Passion Fruit Problems in the Home Landscape

Flower morphology of passion fruit. Credits: Amir Rezazadeh, UF/IFAS

In Florida, purple and yellow passion fruit have been widely cultivated by homeowners for years, and south Florida’s subtropical climate allows for growing passion fruit year-round. Many factors affect longevity and productivity of passion fruit vine, including environmental stresses, pests, and disease. This new 5-page document is designed to help Master Gardeners and homeowners by answering commonly asked questions about passion fruit production problems. Written by Amir Rezazadeh, Mark Bailey, and Ali Sarkhosh, and published by the UF/IFAS Horticultural Sciences Department.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1397

Leaf Spot Diseases of Strawberry

Hands holding harvested strawberries. Photo taken 02-05-20. Photo Credits: UF/IFAS Photo by Cristina Carriz

Several different fungi and one bacterium cause leaf spot diseases of Florida strawberry. Symptoms caused by these pathogens are often similar, leading to confusion and misdiagnosis of the disease. To facilitate diagnosis, the most common leaf spots diseases of strawberry in Florida are described in this new 6-page article, written by Juliana S. Baggio, James C. Mertely, and Natalia A. Peres, and published by the UF/IFAS Plant Pathology Department.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/pp359

The Pear (Pyrus spp.) in Florida Home Gardens

Harvest of ‘Pineapple’ pears. Credits: Chestnut Hill Nursery

Pears are a great tree to grow for an edible landscape or fruit garden. However, pears are not adapted to all areas in Florida, and only a few cultivated varieties will grow well here. An adaptation to warm winters (low chill hours) and disease resistance are the main factors for success. This new 6-page publication of the UF/IFAS Horticultural Sciences Department provides information to help homeowners select and grow pears successfully in Florida. Written by Juanita Popenoe, Ali Sarkhosh, and Dustin Huff.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1393

Planning for a Successful Commercial Subtropical/Tropical Fruit Grove

Row of Mango trees. Photographed on 06-27-18.  Photo Credits:  UF/IFAS Photo by Tyler Jones

Planning is the key to successful grove establishment, maintenance, and production. Developing a detailed infrastructure description and plan, cultural program, and financial and marketing plan for a new or existing grove with a new fruit crop will save you time and money and help minimize mistakes. Prospective growers should compile and analyze information needed to select a grove site, establish the needed infrastructure, and develop maintenance plans for the plants and how the production will be marketed. This new 15-page publication of the UF/IFAS Horticultural Sciences Department presents an outline of the type of information growers need when establishing a tropical fruit grove or contemplating management or modification of an existing grove. Written by Jonathan Crane, Yuncong Li, Edward Evans, Fredy Ballen, and Jeff Wasielewski.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1387

Métodos para el establecimiento de trasplantes de fresa en Florida

Hands holding harvested strawberries. Photo taken 02-05-20. Photo Credits: UF/IFAS Photo by Cristina Carriz

Florida es el segundo productor de fresa más grade de los Estados Unidos, con un valor estimado de $337 millones. La siembra inicia entre finales de septiembre y mediados de octubre, en momentos donde las altas temperaturas representan un reto significativo para la sobrevivencia de los trasplantes, y por tanto también para el rendimiento y la calidad. El propósito principal de esta publicación es proporcionar recomendaciones basadas en resultados de investigación sobre métodos de establecimientos de trasplantes para productores de fresas en la Florida.
This new 5-page publication of the UF/IFAS Horticultural Sciences Department is the Spanish translation of HS1376, Methods for Strawberry Transplant Establishment in Florida. Written by Emmanuel Torres-Quezada, Lincoln Zotarelli, Vance M. Whitaker, and Shinsuke Agehara.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1378

Methods for Strawberry Transplant Establishment in Florida

Hands holding harvested strawberries. Photo taken 02-05-20.  Photo Credits:  UF/IFAS Photo by Cristina Carriz

Florida is the second largest strawberry producer in the United States, with an annual farm gate value of about $300 million. Planting occurs from late September through late October, and high air temperatures pose significant challenges for transplant establishment and thus yield and fruit quality. The primary purpose of this new 4-page publication of the UF/IFAS Horticultural Sciences Department is to provide research-based recommendations on transplant establishment methods for strawberry growers in Florida. The techniques presented are overhead irrigation application methods and practices, strawberry plugs and bare-root transplants, crop protectants, and reflective mulching. Written by Emmanuel Torres-Quezada, Lincoln Zotarelli, Vance M. Whitaker, and Shinsuke Agehara.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1376

Tomato Production in Florida Using Fertigation Technology

Locally grown tomatoes at a farmers market.  Photo Credits: UF/IFAS Photo by Tyler Jones

Tomato is in high demand because of its taste and health benefits. In Florida, tomato is the number one vegetable crop in terms of both acreage and value. Because of its high value and wide acreage, it is important for tomato production to be efficient in its water and nutrient use, which may be improved through fertigation practices. Therefore, the objective of this new 7-page article is to disseminate research-based methods of tomato production utilizing fertigation to enhance yield and nutrient use efficiency. Written by Mary Dixon and Guodong Liu, and published by the UF/IFAS Horticultural Sciences Department.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1392

Goji Berry: a Novel Nutraceutical “Superfruit” for Florida Master Gardeners

Ripe goji berry dried in the sun in China. Credits: Manhe Jiao, Yinchuan, Ningxia, China

Goji berries have been used in both fresh and processed forms for food and medicine for more than 4,000 years in China. The goji berry fruit is known as a “superfruit” thanks to its high levels of vitamins and minerals, as well as other medicinal benefits recognized in many countries around the world. Most of Florida’s climate is favorable for goji berry, and a few Florida growers have cultivated it for years. This species can tolerate infertile and unfavorable growth conditions, and the prominent health benefits of this crop may be highly profitable for Florida growers. The objective of this new 7-page article is to provide a general overview of how the goji berry can be grown in Florida. Written by Yujie Jiao and Guodong Liu, and published by the UF/IFAS Horticultural Sciences Department.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1391