Strip-Planting Rhizoma Peanut into Grazing Systems

Yoana Newman discusses forage grass at a small farms workshop.

Nitrogen (N) is one of the major off-farm inputs in livestock systems, either in the form of N fertilizer or purchased feed. Fortunately, you can reduce those expenses by growing your own nitrogen using forage legumes. Rhizoma perennial peanut (RPP) is a legume adapted to the Florida environment that grows well in mixtures with bahiagrass. This 4-page fact sheet discusses varieties, establishment, weed management, grazing management, and the cost-share program. Written by Jose Dubeux, Lynn Sollenberger, Joao Vendramini, Marcelo Wallau, Ann Blount, Liza Garcia-Jimenez, Erick Santos, and David Jaramillo, and published by the UF/IFAS Agronomy Department, July 2018.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ag421

Brunswickgrass or Paspalum nicorae: A Weed Contaminant in Southern Pastures and Bahiagrass Seed Production Fields

Closely grazed bahiagrass pasture with patches of brunswickgrass in late September (toward the end of the growing season) in Levy County, FL.

Brunswickgrass (Paspalum nicorae Parodi) is becoming a problematic weed in summer perennial grass pastures in the Southeast. The plant is competitive with bahiagrass
and bermudagrass. Since it is less palatable, it can eventually dominate a perennial grass pasture. Brunswickgrass has become naturalized and has reportedly contaminated bahiagrass seed fields and pastures in the southeastern states, including some of the important counties for seed production in Florida, such as Gilchrist, Levy, Alachua, Citrus, and Sumter. This 4-page fact sheet provides an overview of brunswickgrass and discusses its appearance, variety/germplasm, and management. Written by Ann Blount, Marcelo Wallau, Brent Sellers, Dennis Hancock, Leanne Dillard, Jose Dubeux, Cheryl Mackowiak, Joao Vendramini, and Clay Cooper, and published by the UF/IFAS Agronomy Department, April 2018.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ag408

Micronutrients Considerations for Warm-Season Forage Grass Systems in Florida

Warm-season grasses are vital to livestock production systems and dominate ground cover in tropical and subtropical areas. The objective of this 7-page publication is to provide basic information about the role of micronutrients in warm-season grass production systems in Florida. Written by Jane C. Griffin, Joao Vendramini, Diane Rowland, and Maria L. Silveira and published by the UF/IFAS Agronomy Department, November 2017.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ag419

Utilization of Biosolids in Forage Production Systems in Florida

UF/IFAS professor George O'Connor holds up a handful from a pile of biosolids with forage range in the background.

This four-page publication provides basic information about land application of biosolids to pastures and hayfields in Florida. The information contained in this document should be of interest to stakeholders, biosolids managers, students, and scientists interested in topics related to biosolids management practices and the potential benefits and risks associated with biosolid land application. Written by Maria L. Silveira, George A. O’Connor, and Joao M.B. Vendramini and published by the Department of Soil and Water Sciences.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ss658

2011 South Florida Beef Forage Survey Results

Young heifers at the Range Cattle Research Station. These beef cows are all at least 3/4 Angus. They are part of an attempt to create a white Angus breed. During the summer the white cows, coined "white Angus" by the researchers in Ona, have a body temperature that is one degree cooler than the traditional black Angus. UF/IFAS Photo: Sally Lanigan.UF/IFAS Extension faculty and state specialists involved in the UF/IFAS South Florida Beef-Forage Program (SFBFP), in conjunction with the UF/IFAS Program Evaluation and Organizational Development unit, created a survey in 1982 that is used to evaluate ranch management practices. The survey is updated and distributed every five years to ranchers in 14 south Florida counties: Charlotte, Collier, DeSoto, Glades, Hardee, Hendry, Highlands, Hillsborough, Lee, Manatee, Martin, Okeechobee, Polk, and Sarasota. There were 102 anonymous responses in 2011. This 6-page fact sheet discusses characteristics of beef operations in south Florida, reproduction, production, marketing, herd health, nutrition, forage production, and environment. Written by Sonja Crawford, Christa Kirby, Tycee Prevatt, Brent Sellers, Maria Silveira, Bridget Stice, Joao Vendramini, and Lindsey Wiggins, and published by the UF Agronomy Department, October 2016.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ag410

Environmental Impact of Beef Cattle Production Systems

herd of beef cattle on a Florida ranchThis 6-page fact sheet discusses beef demand in the context of a growing population, beef production’s greenhouse gases and their effect on the environment, the great advantage of ruminants, generating accurate greenhouse gas emissions estimates, greenhouse gas emissions by economic sector, and mitigation strategies. Written by Nicolas DiLorenzo, G. Cliff Lamb, Jose Dubeux, John Arthington, Joao Vendramini, and Phillip Lancaster and published by the UF/IFAS Department of Animal Sciences, November 2014. (UF/IFAS Photo by Thomas Wright)
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/an302

2014 Cool-Season Forage Variety Recommendations for Florida

A row of rye grass in a field of crops in North Florida. UF/IFAS Photo: Josh Wickham.This 4-page fact sheet provides the most up-to-date information on current adapted varieties of cool-season forages. The recommendation of varieties is based on multi-location, multi-year cultivar evaluation experiments that may include trials in Georgia and other states. Table 1 includes information about the planting dates, seeding rates, and other considerations. If you have questions about a particular variety, contact your local UF/IFAS Extension agent for additional information. Written by A. R. Blount, J. M. B. Vendramini, J. C. B. Dubeux, Md A. Babar, K. E. Kenworthy, P. R. Muñoz,and K. H. Quesenberry, and published by the UF Department of Agronomy, September 2014. (UF/IFAS Photo: Josh Wickam)
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/aa266

Nutrient Cycling in Grazed Pastures (SL376/SS578)

Figure 1.  Schematic diagram showing how nutrients cycle through several pools, including the atmosphere, soil, plants, and animals.Many forage-based livestock production systems in Florida are characterized by extensive grazing with minimal inputs of commercial fertilizer and supplemental feed. In these systems, adequate soil fertility conditions are essential to sustain forage production. If nutrients become deficient, pasture and animal performance is reduced, and the economic returns of livestock operations may decline. This 3-page fact sheet discusses the different nutrient pathways in grazing pastures to help producers better understand how to promote nutrient cycling and pasture sustainability. Written by Maria L. Silveira, Joao M. B. Vendramini, Hiran M. da Silva, and Mariana Azenha, and published by the UF Department of Soil and Water Science, January 2013.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ss578

Forage Planting and Establishment Methods (SSAGR161/AG107)

ForageEstablishment of an excellent, uniform stand of forage in a short period of time is important. The producer needs to do everything possible to ensure successful establishment. Several requirements that must be met are briefly discussed, along with various planting methods. This revised 8-page fact sheet was written by Y.C. Newman, J. Vendramini, C.G. Chambliss, M.B. Adjei, and published by the UF Department of Agronomy, April 2011.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ag107

Creep Grazing for Suckling Calves: A Pasture Management Practice (SSAGR211/AG193)

The concept of creep grazing is based on the fact that the nutritional requirements of suckling calves are much higher than those of cows. Calves creep grazing on high quality forage that provides high intake of digestible energy and protein make extra growth while the cows are grazing lower quality pasture. Learn more in this revised 4-page fact sheet was written by Y.C. Newman, D.E. Mayo, J. Vendramini, and C.G. Chambliss, and published by the UF Department of Agronomy, March 2011.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ag193

Mulato II (Brachiaria sp.) (SSAGR303/AG310)

Mulato II is a semi-erect perennial apomictic grass that can grow up to 9 ft tall. Brachiariagrasses, including Mulato II, are tropical warm-season forages native to Africa and are the most widely grown forages in tropical South America. This 4-page fact sheet describes teh morphology, region of adaptation and growing season in Florida, recommended production practices, and the results of research into the performance of heifers grazing Mulato. Written by J. Vendramini, B. Sellers, L.E. Sollenberger, and M. Silveira, and published by the UF Department of Agronomy, March 2011.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ag310

Production of Biofuel Crops in Florida: Switchgrass (SSAGR291/AG296)

Nationwide, switchgrass is recommended for biofuel production because of its wide range of adaptation and high potential dry matter yield with relatively low fertility input. It can be used for both lignocellulosic ethanol production and in electricity generation, complementing coal as a co-firing agent supplement. Less is known about switchgrass production in Florida than other biofuel crops. This 4-page fact sheet describes the biofuel potential, biology, production, potential yields, production challenges, estimated costs, and environmental concerns. Includes references. Written by Yoana Newman, Mary J. Williams, Zane Helsel, and Joao Vendramini, and published by the UF Department of Agronomy, March 2011.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ag296

SSAGR337/AG347 Pearl Millet (Pennisetum glaucum): Overview and Management

SS-AGR-337, a 6-page illustrated fact sheet by Yoana Newman, Ed Jennings, Joao Vendramini, and Ann Blount, describes this drought-resistant summer forage crop — plant description and adaptation, history and released cultivars, yield, nutritive value and antiquality factors, site selection, planting date and seeding rates, management, and utilization. Includes references. Published by the UF Department of Agronomy, September 2010.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ag347

SSAGR332/AG342 Bahiagrass (Paspalum notatum): Overview and Management

SS-AGR-332, a 9-page illustrated fact sheet by Yoana Newman, Joao Vendramini, and Ann Blount, provides an overview of this warm-season perennial grass that is widely used in Florida and details of management and production. Includes references. Published by the UF Department of Agronomy, May 2010.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ag342

SSAGR59/AA197 ‘Callide’ Rhodesgrass

Revised! SS-AGR-59, a 4-page fact sheet by J. Vendramini, A. Blount, Y. Newman, C. G. Chambliss and M. B. Adjei, describes this robust, warm-season perennial grass native from Africa, useful in southern Florida for fall and winter grazing — establishment, management of established stands, and pests. Includes references. Published by the UF Department of Agronomy, March 2010.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/aa197

SSAGR24/AG125 Five Basic Steps to Successful Perennial Pasture Grass Establishment From Vegetative Cuttings on South Florida Flatwoods

Revised! SSAGR24, a 4-page illustrated fact sheet by Joe Vendramini, Yoana Newman, Ann Blount, Martin B. Adjei and Paul Mislevy, describes the different steps that minimize establishment failure and lead to a favorable outcome of dense stand of perennial pasture grass. Published by the UF Department of Agronomy, March 2010.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ag125

SL292/SS505 Soil pH and Liming Issues Affecting Bahiagrass Pasture

Revised! SL-292 (formerly SS-AGR-29), a 5-page fact sheet by M. Silveira, J. Vendramini, J. E. Rechcigl and M. B. Adjei, presents results of research conducted to evaluate the long-term effect of liming and N fertilization on dry matter yields, nutritive value, and ground cover of bahiagrass pastures. Includes liming and fertilization recommendations for grazing conditions in south-central Florida flatwoods. Published by the UF Department of Soil and Water Science, September 2009.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/SS505

SS AGR 303/AG310 Mulato (Brachiaria sp.)

SS-AGR-303, a 4-page fact sheet by J. Vendramini, U. Inyang, B. Sellers, L.E. Sollenberger and M. Silveira, describes the this apomictic hybrid of brachiaragrass with good growing potential for Florida pastures. Includes references. Published by the UF Department of Agronomy, May 2008.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/AG310