Charcoal Rot of Strawberries Caused by Macrophomina phaseolina

Charcoal rot is caused by Macrophomina phaseolina and has become more prevalent in Florida strawberry fields since methyl bromide was phased out. This 4-page publication describes the symptoms, development, and control of charcoal rot in strawberry fields. Written by N. A. Peres, J. S. Baggio, and J. C. Mertely and published by the UF/IFAS Department of Plant Pathology, February 2018.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/pp161

Botrytis Fruit Rot or Gray Mold of Strawberry

Botrytis fruit rot (BFR), also known as gray mold, is caused by the fungus Botrytis cinerea and is one of the most important diseases of strawberry in Florida and worldwide. This 4-page document describes the symptoms and management of BFR among strawberry plants. Written by J. C. Mertely, M. S. Oliveira, and N. A. Peres and published by the UF/IFAS Department of Plant Pathology, February 2018.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/pp152

Powdery Mildew of Strawberries (PP208/PP129)

Figure 2. Lower leaf surface of strawberry covered with powdery mildewPowdery mildew occurs in most areas of the world where strawberries are grown, infecting leaves, flowers, and fruit. Infected transplants are normally the primary source of inoculum for fruiting fields in Florida, but even disease-free fields can become infected by conidia blown in from neighboring fields. Fields with susceptible cultivars should be surveyed regularly for powdery mildew, especially early in the season. Usually, controlling foliar infection helps to prevent fruit infection. This 4-page fact sheet was written by N. A. Peres and J. C. Mertely, and published by the UF Department of Plant Pathology, May 2013.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/pp129

Anthracnose Fruit Rot of Strawberry (PP207/PP130)

Figure 1. Anthracnose lesions on a ripe fruitAnthracnose fruit rot is an important disease for strawberry worldwide. Lesions appear as dark, sunken spots on infected fruit. This 4-page fact sheet was written by James C. Mertely and Natalia. A. Peres, and published by the UF Department of Plant Pathology, September 2012.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/pp130