El Mandato del Dispositivo de Registro Electrónico, reglas de las horas de servicio e Implicaciones para los Transportistas de Productos del Sudoeste de Florida

Turnpike, Oranges, Trees, Road, Semitrucks, Grass. UF/IFAS Photo: Josh Wickham

El Mandato del Dispositivo de Registro Electrónico (ELD por sus siglas en ingles), se convirtió en mandato para vehículos motorizados comerciales (CMV) el 18 de diciembre del 2017. El 18 de junio del 2018, después de 90 días de extensión, el mandato también se aplicó a transportistas de productos. El propósito principal detrás del ELD fue asegurar el cumplimiento con los requerimientos de Horas de Servicio (HOS) por autotransporte y sus conductores. Este artículo se enfoca en el movimiento interestatal de propiedades (productos), and sus objetivos son: 1) revisar las reglas HOS; 2) clarificar las excepciones agrícolas a las reglas HOS; y 3) ofrecer una discusión preliminar a cómo los ELD podrían afectar a los productores del sur de Florida. Fritz Roka, Tara Wade, Luis Peña-Lévano, y Craig Sprouse. UF/IFAS Food and Resource Economics Department.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fe1058

Valuing Florida Water Resources: Water Use in Irrigated Agriculture

Citra, Pivot irrigation, sunset with clouds. UF/IFAS Photo: Josh Wickham

Water resources provide us with a variety of goods and services (altogether often referred to as ecosystem services or environmental services.) Part of a series entitled Economic Value of Florida Water Resources, this 5-page fact sheet written by Tatiana Borisova, Syed Irfan Ali Shah, Tara Wade, Kelly Grogan, and Xiang Bi and published by the UF/IFAS Food and Resource Economics Department assesses the economic value of the ecosystem services provided by irrigation water and shows the importance to agriculture of water resource protection and restoration.
http:edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fe1057

Cost of Producing Processed Oranges in Southwest Florida in 2017/18

Orange grove.

This 4-page fact sheet written by Ariel Singerman and published by the UF/IFAS Food and Resource Economics Department presents a summary of the 2017/18 costs of production for processed oranges grown in southwest Florida. Typical users of these estimates include growers and consultants, who use them as a benchmark; property appraisers, who use them to compute the taxes for property owners; and researchers, who use the estimates to evaluate the economic feasibility of potential new technologies.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fe1056

Cost Estimates of Producing Sugar Apple (Annona squamosa L.) in South Florida

Sugar apples

Because of the growing interest in alternative tropical fruit crops to diversify farm income, this 6-page fact sheet written by Fredy H. Ballen, Aditya Singh, Edward Evans, and Jonathan Crane and published by the UF/IFAS Food and Resource Economics Department offers an estimate of costs and returns associated with operating an established sugar apple orchard in south Florida.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fe1053

Crop Insurance Policies Available to Blueberry Growers in Florida

Blueberry field.

The main source of risk in crop production stems from the unpredictable nature of weather, pests, diseases, etc. By purchasing crop insurance, the farmer transfers part of the risk to an insurance company in exchange for paying a premium (which is the cost of purchasing crop insurance). In this 6-page fact sheet published by the UF/IFAS Food and Resource Economics Department, authors Robert Ranieri and Ariel Singerman describe and provide examples for the two main crop insurance policies available for blueberry farmers in Florida.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fe1054

Economic Contributions of the Forest Industry and Forest-based Recreation in Florida in 2016

Pine trees, North Florida, Forest. UF/IFAS Photo: Thomas Wright.

The state of Florida is half woods, with 26,807 square miles of forestland. Our extensive natural and planted pine and hardwood forests are used for production of a wide variety of wood building materials, consumer paper and packaging products, chemicals, and renewable biomass fuels. In addition to industrial forest-related activity, public forestlands in Florida support a variety of recreational activities, attract a significant number of recreational visitors, and provide many non-marketed environmental or ecosystem services. This 4-page fact sheet written by Christa Dean Court, Alan W Hodges, and Mohammad Rahmani and published by the UF/IFAS Food and Resource Economics Department describes a study that analyzed the economic contributions of the forest industry and forest-based recreation activities to the state of Florida in 2016.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fe1051

Sample Productivity and Cost Estimates of Producing Longan (Dimocarpus longan Lour.) in South Florida


Interest is growing in minor tropical fruit crops. This 6-page publication written by Fredy H. Ballen, Edward A. Evans, Aditya Singh, and Jonathan H. Crane and published by the UF/IFAS Food and Resource Economics Department provides an estimate of the costs and returns associated with the operation of an established longan grove in south Florida. Information presented in this article was obtained through field interviews with growers and industry experts; it reflects a wide variety of production practices in small longan orchards of 1 to 4 acres and should help estimate the financial requirements of operating an established grove.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fe1049

The Electronic Logging Devices Mandate and Hours Of Service for Produce Haulers

Turnpike, Oranges, Trees, Road, Semitrucks, Grass. UF/IFAS Photo: Josh Wickham

Electronic logging devices, or ELDs, became mandatory for commercial motor carriers December 18, 2017. The compliance timeline for the produce industry was delayed with two 90-day waivers. On June 18, 2018, however, ELDs became mandatory for produce haulers as well. The primary purpose behind requiring ELDs was to ensure greater compliance with existing hours of service requirements by motor carriers and their drivers. This 5-page fact sheet written by Fritz Roka, Tara Wade, and Craig Sprouse and published by the UF/IFAS Food and Resource Economics Department reviews HOS rules, clarifies agricultural exceptions to the HOS rules, and offers a preliminary discussion as to how ELDs could affect south Florida produce growers.
edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fe1052

The Economics of Planting New Citrus Groves in Florida in the Era of HLB

Figure 5. Color inversion and oblong fruit shape caused by HLB infection. Credits: Megan M. Dewdney, UF/IFAS CREC
Citrus greening, or huanglongbing (HLB), is a bacterial disease that affects citrus trees’ vascular systems, limiting nutrient uptake. As trees become increasingly affected by the disease, they suffer premature fruit drop, the fruit harvested is smaller and misshapen, and the juice quality is compromised, all resulting in lower yield. To this date there is no cure or successful management strategy to deal with HLB. This 8-page fact sheet written by Ariel Singerman, Marina Burani-Arouca, and Stephen H. Futch and published by the UF/IFAS Food and Resource Economics Department summarizes the results of an analysis of three tree densities under different production and market conditions to determine which density is most profitable.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fe1050

Manual de los Reglamentos del Agua de Florida: Ley de Protección de Acuíferos y Manantiales

An alligator in water with fallen leaves surrounding it.  Photo taken 12-19-17.

La Ley del Agua de Florida de 2016, una política integral de agua que aborda los problemas críticos del suministro y la calidad de agua en la Florida, entró en vigor el 1 de julio de 2016. Creó la Ley de Protección de Acuíferos y Manantiales de Florida, que protege los manantiales alimentados por el acuífero floridano. Written by Michael Olexa, Tatiana Borisova, and Jarrett Davis and published by the UF/IFAS Food and Resource Economics Department.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fe1047

Farm Business Start-Up Checklist for Northeast Florida

This 12-page fact sheet written by Kevin Athearn and Jennifer Johns and published by the UF/IFAS Food and Resource Economics Department lists steps for starting a farm business in Northeast Florida, along with resources and contact information to assist a new farmer with completing each step.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fe1042

Blueberry Frost Protection Practices in Florida and Georgia

Private blueberry farm in Alachua County, frozen, frost, crops. UF/IFAS Photo: Thomas Wright.

Written by Tatiana Borisova, Elizabeth Conlan, Erick Smith, Mercy Olmstead, and Jeffrey Williamson and published by the UF/IFAS Food and Resource Economics Department, this publication was developed to assist professionals attempting to establish a benchmark for when to use frost protection in blueberry production. This benchmark can assist in developing outreach strategies to educate producers about frost protection strategies, and it can also help measure changes in their frost protection behavior over time.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fe1045

Labor Shortages in the Florida Strawberry Industry

Florida is the largest supplier of domestic winter strawberries in the United States, and labor is the largest cost item in the Florida strawberry production budget. Labor shortages are a major threat to the industry. This 3-page fact sheet written by Trina Biswas, Feng Wu, and Zhengfei Guan and published by the UF/IFAS Food and Resource Economics Department investigates growers’ labor demand and labor shortages based on a survey conducted in 2016.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fe1041

Cost and Return Estimates of a Mamey Sapote Grove in South Florida, 2017

The objective of this 6-page fact sheet written by Fredy H. Ballen, Aditya Singh, Edward A. Evans, and Jonathan Crane and published by the UF/IFAS Food and Resource Economics Department is to provide an estimate of the costs and returns associated with an established mamey sapote orchard in south Florida.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fe1039

Cost Estimates of Producing Pink Guava (Psidium guajava L.) in South Florida

pink guava photo usda

This 6-page fact sheet written by Edward Evans, Fredy H. Ballen, Jonathan Crane, and Aditya Singh and published by the UF/IFAS Food and Resource Economics Department presents the estimated costs and returns associated with the operation of an established pink guava grove in south Florida. The information presented was collected through field interviews with growers and industry specialists; it reflects a wide diversity of production techniques in small guava orchards. The information presented is intended only as a reference to estimate the financial requirements of operating an established pink guava grove.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fe1036

The H-2A Program and Immigration Reform in the United States

Workers picking and loading lettuce onto a conveyor belt UF/IFAS Photo by Tyler Jones.
The Immigration and Nationality Act (INA) of 1952 authorized a nonimmigrant visa category, known as H-2, for foreign agricultural and nonagricultural workers to come to the United States and perform temporary services. To protect against disruptions in the farm labor supply, many growers are turning to the H-2A program to import foreign guest workers. This 5-page fact sheet written by Berdikul Qushim, Zhengfei Guan, and Fritz M. Roka and published by the UF/IFAS Food and Resource Economics Department explains the H-2A program and briefly discusses immigration reform.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fe1029

An Overview of the US Bell Pepper Industry

A pile of harvested bell peppers.  UF/IFAS Photo by Tyler Jones
Bell pepper is one of the most widely cultivated vegetable crops in the world; it is widely grown all over the United States, and production of bell pepper has been a major economic contribution to the vegetable industry in Florida and California. This 4-page fact sheet written by Trina Biswas, Zhengfei Guan, and Feng Wu and published by the UF/IFAS Food and Resource Economics Department provides an overview of the US bell pepper industry, including production, prices, and trade.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fe1028

The US Tomato Industry: An Overview of Production and Trade

A bin of cherry tomatoes UF/IFAS Photo by Amy Stuart
Tomatoes are one of the world's most consumed vegetable crops. In the United States, domestic production meets about 40% of the total domestic demand for fresh-market tomatoes, with the rest of the demand met by imports, mostly from Mexico and Canada. Since 2000, however, fresh tomato production in the United States has exhibited a steady declining trend. One major reason is the increased competition from Mexico. This 4-page fact sheet written by Zhengfei guan, Trina Biswas, and Feng Wu and published by the UF/IFAS Food and Resource Economics Department argues for US government measures to help the domestic tomato industry resolve labor shortages and encourage research and development of labor-saving technologies such as mechanical harvesting to make the US tomato industry more competitive and sustainable.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fe1027

Labor Requirements and Costs for Harvesting Tomatoes

Biological Scientist, Brian Sidoti, arranges tomatoes harvested from tests at  the University of Florida's Gulf Coast Research and Education Center in Bradenton.

Florida accounts for 30% to 40% of all commercially produced fresh-market tomatoes in the United States. Almost every southern county in the state grows tomatoes. This 4-page fact sheet written by Zhengfei Guan, Feng Wu, and Steven Sargent and published by the UF/IFAS Food and Resource Economics Department presents the results of a 2015 study that examined the time it takes to harvest this important crop.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fe1026

Economic Contributions of the Florida Citrus Industry in 2015/16

Citrus groves around Lake Alfred, Florida. Oranges, fruit, trees. UF/IFAS Photo by Tyler Jones.

This 2-page fact sheet written by Christa D. Court, Alan W. Hodges, Mohammad Rahmani, and Thomas H. Spreen and published by the UF/IFAS Food and Resource Economics Department describes the economic contributions of the citrus industry to the state of Florida in fiscal year 2015/16, updating previous studies for 2012/13 and 2014/15 and previous estimates for the economic impacts of citrus greening disease.
edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fe1021