How to Establish an Urban Agriculture Ordinance

Garden | Urban Farming | Organic

While the desire to implement urban agriculture projects is growing in popularity, there is little information available to help Extension agents and interested citizens fully understand how to implement urban agriculture in their community. This new 11-page document provides an overview of key information required to establish an urban agriculture ordinance. Case studies from urban agriculture initiatives in Florida provide real-world examples of the required activities, potential challenges, and beneficial partners for implementing these initiatives. Resources related to the case studies and additional urban agriculture resources can be found at the end of the document, so that readers can find further information specific to their interests and needs. Written by Candace A. Spencer, Catherine G. Campbell, Anna Prizzia, and Liz Felter, and published by the UF/IFAS Horticultural Sciences Department.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1327

Key Plant, Key Pests: Holly (Ilex sp.)

Hollies are known for their woody branches and vibrant red berries

This series of Key Plant, Key Pests publications are designed for Florida gardeners, horticulturalists, and landscape professionals to help identify common pests associated with common Florida flora. This publication, the eighth in the Key Plant, Key Pests series, helps identify the most common pests found on Holly (Ilex sp.). This publication provides information and general management recommendations for Florida wax scale, tea scale, Cylindrocladium leaf spot, dieback, Sphaeropsis gall, root knot nematodes, and magnesium deficiency. This five-page document was written by Juanita Popenoe, Caroline R. Warwick, Jacqueline Bourdon, and Liz Felter and published by the UF/IFAS Department of Environmental Horticulture.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep566

Guidelines for Operation and Usage of County Kitchens in the State of Florida

Fresh vegetables being cut. Photo taken 10-01-15.In recent years, many people have become interested in developing small food businesses. Using county kitchens to make food products for sale may seem very attractive. However, because of different local, state, and federal regulation requirements, there may be some confusion and unresolved conflicts among different parties as to the legalities and practicalities involved. This 3-page fact sheet provides guidelines and advice for Florida Extension personnel to use when determining the appropriate usage for their kitchen facilities, based on a situation in one Florida county. The publication covers utilization, roles and responsibilities, and potential liability issues relevant to the use of county kitchens, providing some potential solutions to conflicts for all parties. Written by Amarat Simonne, Tim Wilson, Geralyn Sachs, Joanne Cooper, Brenda Morris, Steven von Bodungen, and Liz Felter, and published by the UF Department of Family, Youth and Community Sciences, August 2016.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fy1469