Supplemental Nutrition Drinks: Do I Need Them?

Supplemental nutrition drinks are often used in hospitals and adult care homes to help nourish those who may be eating poorly. More recently, these drinks have become available for purchase by consumers. This 2-page publication explores the question that many older adults ask: “Do I need supplemental nutrition drinks?” Written by Claire Marie Fassett, Nancy J. Gal, and Wendy J. Dahl and published by the UF/IFAS Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, August 2018.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fs315

Salt: Should I Cut Back?

Sodium is important for our body to maintain fluid balance, blood volume, and blood pressure; however, many people consume more dietary sodium (from salt) than needed. This 3-page publication explores the health effects of excessive sodium intake and ways to decrease intake of this mineral. Written by Asmaa Fatani, Nancy J. Gal, and Wendy J. Dahl and published by the UF/IFAS Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, August 2018.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fs312

CKD: A Guide to Higher Fiber Foods

Living with chronic kidney disease (CKD) presents many challenges, and diet is one of them. People with CKD may find it difficult to consume enough fiber-rich foods while following the other diet recommendations for CKD. This 5-page guide will discuss the health benefits of fiber and provide some examples of fiber-rich foods that may be good choices for people with CKD. Written by Wendy J. Dahl and Nancy J. Gal and published by the UF/IFAS Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, January 2018.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fs305

Sick Day Management for Adults with Diabetes Who Take Insulin

Hand held electronic diabetes monitoring devices. Metabolic diseases, blood sugar. Image used in the 2012 Annual Research Report.

When people have type 1 or type 2 diabetes and take multiple daily insulin injections, their blood glucose levels can rise drastically due to a cold or another minor illness. This can result in serious health problems. The best way for people with diabetes to prevent a minor illness from becoming a major illness is to have a personalized sick day plan designed with their health care provider before they become ill. This 4-page fact sheet is a major revision that discusses ways in which illness affects diabetes control, development of a sick day plan, times to call your health care provider, checking blood glucose and urine ketones, medicines, and diet. Written by Nancy J. Gal and Linda B. Bobroff, and published by the UF Department of Family, Youth and Community Sciences, revised June 2017.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fy1281

Chronic Kidney Disease: Potassium and Your Diet

Dr. Wendy Dahl posing with fiber and food to stop kidney disease. Image used in the 2014 Research Discoveries report.  UF/IFAS Photo by Javier Edwards

Potassium is an essential mineral required for normal body function. It helps maintain normal blood pressure, fluid and electrolyte balance, muscle and nerve function, as well as bone density. This three-page fact sheet describes potassium and its normal dietary importance, as well as the impact potassium levels have on those with Chronic Kidney Disease. Written by Ashley R. Kendall, Nancy J. Gal, and Wendy J. Dahl and published by the Food Science and Human Nutrition Department.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fs287

Diabetes-Related Websites

Laptop computer. Portable electronics, technology, computing. UF/IFAS Photo: Thomas Wright.

Managing diabetes requires learning about your disease, making positive lifestyle choices, and being a partner with your health care team. Finding and using current and reliable sources of health information on the Internet also helps you make choices that support your health while avoiding potentially harmful products and practices. This 1-page fact sheet is a major revision that provides links to government, educational, and recognized professional websites on diabetes. Written by Linda B. Bobroff and Nancy J. Gal, and published by the UF Department of Family, Youth and Community Sciences. Revised May 2016.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fy1103

Vivir con Diabetes

Hand held electronic diabetes monitoring devices. Metabolic diseases, blood sugar. Image used in the 2012 Annual Research Report.

La diabetes es una enfermedad que afecta a más de 29 millones de estadounidenses. Aunque no existe cura para tipo 1 o tipo 2 diabetes, con los cuidados necesarios se puede controlar la enfermedad.

This 5-page fact sheet is the Spanish version of Living with Diabetes. This major revision provides an overview of diabetes, a list of people at high risk of developing the disease, and a description of each type of diabetes. It also discusses tests, possible health problems, control of blood glucose, and diabetes management. Written by Nancy J. Gal and Linda B. Bobroff, and published by the UF Department of Family, Youth and Community Sciences, revised May 2016.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fy924

Chronic Kidney Disease: Phosphorus and Your Diet

Figure 1. Food preparation area in the home kitchen
Phosphorous is an essential mineral necessary for the formation of bones and teeth, but also for kidney function and the regulation of muscle contractions, heartbeat, and nerve transmission. High blood levels of phosphorus may lead to adverse effects on bone, kidney, and heart health. When there is too much phosphorus in the blood, the body reacts by leaching calcium from the bones. This can be especially dangerous for those with Chronic Kidney Disease. This four-page fact sheet discusses the relationship between Chronic Kidney Disease and Phosphorous intake, examining foods that are high in phosphorous and ways to manage phosphorous levels. Written by Nancy J. Gal, Lauren Headrick, Kate Bennett, and Wendy J. Dahl, and published by the Food Science and Human Nutrition Department.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fs273

Datos sobre el fosforo

Figure 1. Modelo de grupo fosfatoEl fósforo es un mineral que se encuentra en todas las células del cuerpo, por lo general en forma de fosfato. Es el segundo mineral más abundante en el cuerpo después del calcio. Alrededor del 85% del fósforo se almacena en los huesos y dientes. Es importante para la formación de huesos y dientes, además de la reparación de huesos.
This 3-page fact sheet was written by Nancy J. Gal y Wendy J. Dahl, and published by the UF Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, August 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fs252

Datos sobre los Carbohidratos

Figure 1. Nutrition labelLos carbohidratos, grasas y proteínas son los tres nutrientes que proveen energía (calorías). Sin embargo, los carbohidratos como los almidones y azúcares son la fuente más importante y principal de energía. Durante la digestión, el almidón se rompe en azúcares (glucosa). Los carbohidratos en forma de glucosa proveen energía a las células, tejidos y órganos para llevar a cabo las actividades diarías. Alguna glucosa se almacena en el hígado y células de los músculos para usarla cuando se requiera. Los niños necesitan carbohidratos para el crecimiento y los adultos necesitan para mantener el peso. This 3-page fact sheet is the Spanish language version of Facts about Carbohydrate, written by Nancy J. Gal, Amanda L. Ford and Wendy J. Dahl, and published by the UF Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, July 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fs250

Facts about Carbohydrate

Figure 1. Nutrition labelCarbohydrate, fat, and protein are the three nutrients that provide energy (calories). However, carbohydrate from starch and sugars is our main and most important source of energy. During digestion, starch is broken down to sugar (glucose). Carbohydrate in the form of glucose provides energy to cells, tissues, and organs to carry out daily activities. Some glucose is stored in the liver and muscle cells for later use when required. Children need carbohydrate for growth, and adults need carbohydrate to maintain their weight. This 3-page fact sheet was written by Nancy J. Gal, Amanda L. Ford, and Wendy J. Dahl, and published by the UF Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, February 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fs243

Facts about Phosphorus

DNA KIT Phosphate GroupPhosphorus is a mineral found in every cell of the body, usually in the form of phosphate. It is the second most abundant mineral in the body after calcium. About 85% of phosphorus is stored in the bones and teeth. It is important for forming bones and teeth, as well as repairing bones. This 3-page fact sheet was written by Nancy J. Gal and Wendy J. Dahl, and published by the UF Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, January 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fs237

MyPlate for Dysphagia (FHSN1214/FS207)

Figure 3. Beef burger with bun (both puréed ), topped with ketchup and mustard, served with shaped purées of corn and sliced pineapple as side dishes, and coconut custard for dessertResources and tools at ChooseMyPlate.gov that provide clear, actionable information about how to make better food choices can be easily adapted for persons with swallowing difficulties (dysphagia) that require texture-modified foods. This 3-page fact sheet was written by Jamila R. Lepore, Nancy Gal, and Wendy J. Dahl, and published by the UF Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, December 2012.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fs207

Living with Diabetes (FCS8706/FY334)

Figure 1. Anybody can get diabetes, so it is important to make sure you follow a healthy diet and have your blood glucose levels checked regularly by your doctor.Diabetes is a disease that affects more than 26 million Americans. Although there is no cure for type 1 or type 2 diabetes, diabetes can be managed with the proper care. If you have diabetes, the best way to live well is to learn about the disease and work with your doctor to develop a healthy living plan that is right for you. This 4-page fact sheet was written by Nancy J. Gal and Linda B. Bobroff, and published by the UF Department of Family Youth and Community Sciences, July 2012.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fy334

Living with Diabetes: Putting Together an Emergency Preparedness Plan (FCS80007/FY1300)

Figure 3. If you have diabetes and use insulin, it is important to havePeople with diabetes need to prepare in advance by having a plan and supply kit ready in the event of an emergency. This 3-page fact sheet describes key concerns that should be considered when developing an emergency plan and putting together a supply kit, and lists the things that should be included in the supply kit. Written by Nancy J. Gal and published by the UF Department of Family Youth and Community Sciences, April 2012.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fy1300

Sick Day Management for Adults with Diabetes Who Take Insulin (FCS8996/FY1281)

Figure 1.  If you are sick and have diabetes, it is a good idea to keep a written log of key information to share with your health care provider.When people have type 1 diabetes or have type 2 diabetes and take daily multiple insulin injections, getting a cold or another minor illness can cause their blood glucose levels to go very high. This can result in serious health problems. The best way for people with diabetes to prevent a minor illness from becoming a major illness is to have a personalized sick day plan designed with their health care provider before they get ill. This 3-page fact sheet was written by Nancy J. Gal and Linda B. Bobroff, and published by the UF Department of Family Youth and Community Sciences, March 2012.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fy1281

FCS8875/FY1103 Diabetes-Related Web Sites

FCS-8875, a 1-page fact sheet by Linda B. Bobroff and Nancy J. Gal, provides a list of recommended Web sites to help people with diabetes increase their knowledge, better communicate with their health care teams, and make important lifestyle choices that allow them to live well with diabetes and reduce long-term health risks. Published by the UF Department of Family Youth and Community Sciences, August 2009.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/FY1103