Vida Saludable: Use sus medicinas de una manera segura

Elaine Turner, left, assistant professor with the University of Florida's Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, and Paul Doering, a UF professor of pharmacy, discuss how grapefruit juice affects absorption of certain drugs Tuesday 7/3. Turner and Doering are members of a new UF committee that will produce consumer-targeted educational materials on drug interactions. Special emphasis will be placed on clarifying the "grapefruit juice effect," which experts say has been overstated in the press.

Las medicinas nos pueden hacer sentir mejor y mejorar nuestra salud, pero si no las usamos correctamente nos pueden hacer sentir peor o hasta causarnos problemas de salud mayores. This is the Spanish-language version of FCS8594/FY667, Healthy Living: Use Your Medicines Safely! This 5-page document provides tips to help you use your medicines safely. Written by Paulina Wittkowsky, Linda B. Bobroff, and Emily Minton, and published by the UF/IFAS Department of Family, Youth and Community Sciences, revised February 2018.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fy668

Nutrition for Health and Fitness: Fiber in Your Diet

Slices and wedges of oranges. Photo taken 11-08-15

Whether you call it dietary fiber, fiber, or roughage, eating a diet rich in this food component is good for your health. This 8-page fact sheet provides tips on how to include foods with fiber in your diet. Written by Linda B. Bobroff, and published by the UF/IFAS Department of Family, Youth and Community Sciences, revised March 2018.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/he697

Vida Saludable: Los alimentos pueden afectar sus medicamentos

Gator Go, High Protein Milk. Source: Smather's Archives.

Algunos alimentos pueden afectar la manera en que los medicamentos con prescripción o sin prescripción médica funcionan, ya sea retardando, disminuyendo o aumentando la cantidad del medicamento que el cuerpo absorbe. Esto puede ocasionar efectos secundarios peligrosos y no deseados. Written by Paulina Wittkowsky and Linda B. Bobroff, and published by the UF/IFAS Department of Family, Youth and Community Sciences, revised January 2018.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fy677

The Food Recall Manual (Version 2)

Any business involved in the manufacture, processing, packing, holding, or delivery of food to humans needs to understand and address food recalls. When safety concerns arise with food you are manufacturing, you have a legal and ethical responsibility to mitigate any damage to the health and wellbeing of consumers. This manual details what you need to know to effectively understand and handle a food recall. Written by Keith R. Schneider, Renee Goodrich-Schneider, Douglas A. Archer, Michelle D. Danyluk, George L. Baker, and Chris Thomas and published by the UF/IFAS Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, February 2018.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fs108

Seguridad Alimentaria: Juegatela seguro con los huevos

Fresh eggs at the farmers market downtown union street.

Los huevos frescos pueden contener bacterias que podrían causar una enfermedad llamada salmonelosis. Esta enfermedad causada por alimentos provoca vómito y diarrea. Esta puede ser severa y hasta podría ser fatal para los adultos de mayor edad. Reduzca el riesgo de contraer esta enfermedad al seguir estas pautas. Written by Linda B. Bobroff and Jennifer Hillan, and published by the UF/IFAS Department of Family, Youth and Community Sciences, revised February 2018.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fy194

Seguridad Alimentaria: Su cocina pasa la prueba?

Cutting vegetables and food preparation.

Los adultos mayores corren un mayor riesgo de contraer enfermedades transmitidas por alimentos. Para ayudar a reducir el riesgo, es importante tener prácticas de manipulación de alimentos sanas. Cómo se compara su cocina? Written by Jennifer Hillan and Linda B. Bobroff, and published by the UF/IFAS Department of Family, Youth and Community Sciences, revised January 2018.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fy1163

HACCP: An Overview

HACCP is a food safety management system that is used in various segments of the food industry. The objectives of this 4-page fact sheet are to introduce the topic and to summarize the key components of a HACCP program. Written by J. A. Lepper, R. M. Goodrich-Schneider, K. R. Schneider, M. D. Danyluk and A. Sreedharan and published by the UF/IFAS Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, January 2018.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fs122

The Food Safety Modernization Act of 2011-Final Rule for Preventive Controls for Human Food

This 7-page fact sheet is one in a series covering the different rules promulgated under the new Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA), which was signed into law on January 4, 2011. It is intended to provide an overview of the final Preventive Controls for Human Food (PCHF) rule. Written by Jessica A. Lepper, Soohyoun Ahn, Keith R. Schneider, Michelle D. Danyluk, and Renee Goodrich-Schneider and published by the UF/IFAS Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, January 2018.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fs301

Food Safety on the Farm: Good Agricultural Practices and Good Handling Practices-Sanitary Facilities

The Food Safety on the Farm series is a collection that reviews the generally recognized principles of GAPs (good agricultural practices) as they relate to produce, primarily at the farm level and with a particular focus on fresh Florida crops and practices. This publication focuses on GAPs and GHPs (good handling practices) relating specifically to sanitary facilities. Written by Jessica A. Lepper, Aswathy Sreedharan, Renee M. Goodrich-Schneider, and Keith R. Schneider and published by the UF/IFAS Food Science and Human Nutrition Department, January 2018.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fs159

Preventing Foodborne Illness: E coli "The Big Six"

This 7-page fact sheet is one in a series of fact sheets discussing common foodborne pathogens of interest to food handlers, processors, and retailers. It covers the characteristics of, and symptoms caused by, the bacterium E. coli (particularly the “big six” strains), and also details how to minimize the risk of spreading or contracting an E. coli infection. Written by Bruna Bertoldi, Susanna Richardson, Renee Goodrich-Schneider, Ploy Kurdmongkoltham, and Keith R. Schneider and published by the UF/IFAS Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, January 2018.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fs233

South Florida Tropicals: Avocado

Avocados growing on a tree. Avocado fruit. UF/IFAS Photo by Tyler Jones.

This 4-page fact sheet is a major revision that discusses the background, availability, selection, ripening, storage, uses, yield, nutritive value, and basic, safe preparation of the avocado. The document also contains several avocado-based recipes. Written by Linda B. Bobroff and Amy Simonne, and published by the UF/IFAS Department of Family, Youth and Community Sciences, revised January 2018.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/he606

Food Safety on the Farm: Good Agricultural Practices and Good Handling Practices-Worker Health and Hygiene

The ‘Food Safety on the Farm’ series is a collection that reviews the generally recognized principles of GAPs (good agricultural practices) as they relate to produce, primarily at the farm level and with particular focus on fresh Florida crops and practices. This 4-page publication focuses on GAPs and GHPs (good handling practices) relating specifically to worker health and hygiene. Written by Jessica A. Lepper, Keith R. Schneider, Renee M. Goodrich-Schneider, and Aswathy Sreedharan and published by the UF/IFAS Food Science and Human Nutrition Department, December 2017.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fs158

Food Safety on the Farm: Good Agricultural Practices and Good Handling Practices-Field Sanitation

The ‘Food Safety on the Farm’ series is a collection that reviews the generally recognized principles of GAPs (good agricultural practices) as they relate to produce, primarily at the farm level and with particular focus on fresh Florida crops and practices. This 4-page publication focuses on GAPs and GHPs (good handling practices) relating specifically to field sanitation. Written by Jessica A. Lepper, Aswathy Sreedharan, Renee M. Goodrich-Schneider, and Keith R. Schneider and published by the UF/IFAS Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, December 2017.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fs160

Food Allergies

A food allergy is a specific immune system reaction that happens after a person consumes what is normally considered a safe food. Reactions can range in severity from minor to fatal. This 4-page document discusses the cause, symptoms, and management of food allergies in children and adults. Written by Keith R. Schneider, Renee Goodrich-Schneider, Soohyoun Ahn, Susie Richardson, Ploy Kurdmongkoltham, and Bruna Bertoldi and published by the UF/IFAS Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, November 2017.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fs123

Food Safety Tips for the Holiday Season

Food is always an important part of holiday festivities, but holiday meals can take a turn for the worse if food safety is not properly practiced when preparing and cooking the food. This 7-page factsheet provides information about safe food practices for the holidays. Written by Soohyoun Ahn, Jessica A. Lepper, and Keith R. Schneider and published by the UF/IFAS Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, November 2017.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fs260

South Florida Tropicals: Carambola

The names carambola and mamey sapote may not be household words yet, but researchers at the University of Florida's Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences say these tropical "designer" fruits may bring sweet success for South Florida growers who lost hundreds of acres of groves and farmland in Hurricane Andrew. Tropical fruit crops specialist Jonathan Crane, shown tasting a carambola or "star fruit" at UF/IFAS' Tropical Research and Education Center in Homestead, is working with farmers to establish the new crops in the area. UF/IFAS economists say the fruits, already popular in Asian and Hispanic cultures, could create valuable new markets for South Florida.The carambola or star fruit is native to Southeast Asia. It was introduced to Florida about 100 years ago. This 4-page fact sheet is a major revision that discusses availability, selection, uses, nutritive value, and food safety during preparation of carambola. This document also includes several recipes. Written by Amy Simonne and Linda B. Bobroff, and published by the UF Department of Family, Youth and Community Sciences, revised April 2017.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/he613

Preventing Foodborne Illness: Clostridium botulinum

photomicrographic view of a gentian violet-stained culture specimen revealing the presence of numerous Gram-positive Clostridium botulinum, formerly known as Bacillus botulinus, bacteria and bacterial endospores.

Clostridium botulinum is the bacterium that causes botulism.This seven-page fact sheet describes the different types of botulism, the symptoms of botulism, the foods associated with botulism, and ways to prevent botulism. Written by Keith R. Schneider, Renée M. Goodrich Schneider, Ploy Kurdmongkoltham, and Bruna Bertoldi and published by the Food Science and Human Nutrition Department.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fs104

Raising Healthy Children: Wheat Allergies

If your child has been diagnosed with a wheat allergy, you may be wondering what you will feed him or her, because wheat is an ingredient in so many foods. Learning about ways to manage and treat your child’s allergy can help make this diagnosis less scary. This six-page publication is designed to provide you with information about wheat allergies and tips to help keep your child safe and reaction-free. Written by Pooja Tolani and Gail P.A. Kauwell and published by the Food Science and Human Nutrition Department.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fs299

Preventing Foodborne Illness Associated with Clostridium perfringens

The bacterium Clostridium perfringens causes one of the most common types of foodborne gastroenteritis in the United States, often referred to as perfringens food poisoning. It is associated with consuming contaminated food that contains great numbers of vegetative cells and spores that will produce toxin inside the intestine. This six-page fact sheet describes the bacterium, outbreaks associated with it, and how to prevent illness from this bacterium. Written by Keith R. Schnedier, Renee Goodrich-Schneider, Ploy Kurdmongkoltham, and Bruna Bertoldi and published by the Food Science and Human Nutrition Department.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fs101

Preventing Foodborne Illness: Bacillus cereus

A colony of Bacillus cereus

Ingesting foods contaminated with Bacillus cereus bacteria can lead to nausea, vomiting, abdominal cramps, and diarrhea. Though B. cereus is commonly found in many types of fresh and processed foods, proper cooking, handling, and storage can minimize the risk of contamination. This 5-page fact sheet explains how B. cereus is transmitted, what foods it is commonly associated with, the methods used to prevent contamination, and good practices for receiving, handling, processing, and storing food. Written by Keith R. Schneider, Renée Goodrich Schneider, Rachael Silverberg, Ploy Kurdmongkoltham, and Bruna Bertoldi, and published by the Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fs269