Lactose Intolerance: What Consumers Need to Know

Lactose intolerance can be an uncomfortable, inconvenient condition with a variety of causes and treatments. This 3-page document will provide guidance for consumers so that they may find the right information to help them manage this condition. Written by Matt Krug and Amy Simonne and published by the UF/IFAS Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, November 2018.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fs316

South Florida Tropicals: Avocado

Avocados growing on a tree. Avocado fruit. UF/IFAS Photo by Tyler Jones.

This 4-page fact sheet is a major revision that discusses the background, availability, selection, ripening, storage, uses, yield, nutritive value, and basic, safe preparation of the avocado. The document also contains several avocado-based recipes. Written by Linda B. Bobroff and Amy Simonne, and published by the UF/IFAS Department of Family, Youth and Community Sciences, revised January 2018.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/he606

South Florida Tropicals: Carambola

The names carambola and mamey sapote may not be household words yet, but researchers at the University of Florida's Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences say these tropical "designer" fruits may bring sweet success for South Florida growers who lost hundreds of acres of groves and farmland in Hurricane Andrew. Tropical fruit crops specialist Jonathan Crane, shown tasting a carambola or "star fruit" at UF/IFAS' Tropical Research and Education Center in Homestead, is working with farmers to establish the new crops in the area. UF/IFAS economists say the fruits, already popular in Asian and Hispanic cultures, could create valuable new markets for South Florida.The carambola or star fruit is native to Southeast Asia. It was introduced to Florida about 100 years ago. This 4-page fact sheet is a major revision that discusses availability, selection, uses, nutritive value, and food safety during preparation of carambola. This document also includes several recipes. Written by Amy Simonne and Linda B. Bobroff, and published by the UF Department of Family, Youth and Community Sciences, revised April 2017.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/he613

Food Safety at Tailgating

healthy food on the grillWhile tailgating can be a great fun for family and friends, you need to make plans and take on-site precautions to keep your food safe during these events. Since refrigerators and running water are not always available for the events, you should familiarize yourself with the safe food handling practices for these outdoor events and plan ahead so you will be prepared with enough coolers/ice and all the tools you need to keep and cook your food safely. This 3-page fact sheet provides information on safe food practices for tailgating and other outdoor sporting events. Written by Soohyoun Ahn, Amarat H. Simonne, and Keith R. Schneider, and published by the UF Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, October 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fs256

How to Start a Food Business: Introduction

Farmer's MarketWhile running your own food business can be a rewarding and exciting experience, it can be overwhelming and stressful. It is important to understand the pros and cons of running your own food business and decide if you are ready to pursue a food business venture. This 3-page fact sheet was written by Soohyoun Ahn, Renee Goodrich-Schneider, and Amarat H. Simonne, and published by the UF Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, September 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fs254

Clostridium difficile: an Important Opportunistic Pathogen in Healthcare-Associated Infections

Based on photomicrographic data, this illustration depicts the ultrastructural morphology exhibited by a single Gram-positive Clostridium difficile bacillus.Opportunistic pathogens are significant health threats to vulnerable people with weakened immune systems, such as people with HIV/AIDS or those on immune-suppressing therapies. One opportunistic pathogen, Clostridium difficile, has been getting more attention in recent years because of its association with antibiotic use and high death rate in the elderly. This factsheet will provide an overview of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) with a focus on healthcare-associated infections. This 5-page fact sheet was written by Soohyoun Ahn and Amarat H. Simonne, and published by the UF Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, September 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fs253

Facts about Quinoa

Figure 1.  Quinoa is a nutritious seed that serves as a whole grain.The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s MyPlate nutrition guide recommends that Americans consume half of their grains from whole grain foods. Whole wheat bread and oatmeal are whole grain foods that are familiar to most Americans, but lots of other whole grain foods are also available. An example of an unfamiliar whole grain food is quinoa (pronounced keen-wa). Quinoa is a nutritious seed that is simple to prepare. It can be served as a hot cereal or side dish, as a cold salad similar to pasta salad, or it can be used in recipes in place of rice or other grains. It also has the advantage of being gluten free, which is a must for people diagnosed with celiac disease. Follow the link to learn more about quinoa and what it has to offer. This 3-page fact sheet was written by Alexandra Dati, Gail Kauwell, and Amy Simonne, and published by the UF Department of Family Youth and Community Sciences, May 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fy1408

Being Smart about Gluten and Gluten-free Issues, Part 2: What Retailers and Consumers Need to Know about Gluten and Gluten-free Product Labeling

Gluten free choiceIn 2011, gluten was recognized as having a specific link to celiac disease, and some consumers hoping to minimize the symptoms of celiac disease have opted to modify their diets. This is the second of a three-part series of publications called “Being Smart about Gluten and Gluten-Free Issues.” The purpose of this publication is to supply retailers and consumers with easy-to-understand information about labeling as related to gluten-free products. This 3-page fact sheet was written by Abigail Dicks, Amy Harder, and Amy Simonne, and published by the UF Department of Agricultural Education and Communication, September 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/wc153

Safe Dishwashing Without an Automatic Dishwasher for Home, Community Events, and Outdoor Activities

washing a plate in a basinMost of us are accustomed to the ease and convenience of washing our dishes in an automatic dishwasher. At times, however, no dishwasher is available. This 4-page fact sheet teaches ways to safely wash or clean your dishes by hand, which may be necessary when your dishwasher is broken, you are outdoors, or you are working in a facility without a dishwasher. Written by Morgan Denhard, Amy Simonne, and Ricki McWilliams, and published by the UF Department of Family Youth and Community Sciences, December 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fy1403

Home Gardening Food Safety: Washing the Fruits (and Vegetables) of Your Labor Properly

Figure 3.  You can use a scrub brush or your hands to clean tomatoes while washing them under cool running water. You should rinse and rub them for five seconds and then re-rinse them..Having a home garden has become popular recently. It is a great way to enjoy fresh fruits and vegetables—foods that are an important part of a healthy diet. However, just because you have your own garden and control how it is treated does not make the fruits and vegetables you grow safer than those you buy in the store. To reduce the chance of getting sick from foodborne illnesses, you must wash the fruits and vegetables you grow before eating them raw or cooked. This publication helps you learn the proper way to clean your fruits and vegetables so you can enjoy them safely. This 4-page fact sheet was written by Eshani Persaud, Amy Simonne, and Karla P. Shelnutt, and published by the UF Department of Family Youth and Community Sciences, November 2013.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fy1401

Eating Defensively: The Nutrition and Food Safety Benefits of Cooked Produce

Figure 1. Cooked vegetables are nutrient rich and can make some nutrients easier to digest and absorb. Current nutrition trends such as the “raw food diet” may lead consumers to believe that raw leafy vegetables are more nutritious than cooked vegetables, despite research showing that cooked vegetables make important nutritional contributions. This publication describes the nutrient retention and quality of cooked vegetables, explains why cooking vegetables is appropriate for consumers with food safety concerns, and provides tips for preparing cooked vegetables. This 4-page fact sheet was written by Morgan Dehnard, Amy Simonne, and Gail P. A. Kauwell, and published by the UF Department of Family Youth and Community Sciences, October 2013.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fy1395

Melons: Safe Handling Practices for Consumers

melon in the fieldSince most of us buy melons at the store or farmers market, it is easy to forget that most melons are grown on the ground. Watermelons, cantaloupe, and honeydew melon are the most popular varieties of melons in the United States. Because they are exposed to pests and microorganisms from dirt, it is very important to apply the best food safety practices before enjoying them.This 3-page fact sheet was written by Amy Simonne, and published by the UF Department of Family Youth and Community Sciences, June 2013.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fy488

Being Smart About Gluten and Gluten-Free Issues, Part 1: What Are the Health Concerns Surrounding Gluten? (WC133/WC133)

3D-rendering of a red question mark served in a plate ready to eatAre you an inquisitive consumer who asks what the big deal is about gluten free? Ask no more; this article is the first in a three–part series about gluten. This 7-page fact sheet identifies health conditions surrounding the ingestion of gluten. The resources used in this article are research and evidence based and/or peer reviewed to provide straightforward and simple information about a few gluten-related topics. Written by Abigail Dicks, Amy Harder, and Amy Simonne, and published by the UF Department of Agricultural Education and Communication, January 2013.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/wc133

Keeping Food Safe: Choosing and Using Food Thermometers in Homes (FCS1083/HE770)

Instant-read, bimetal thermometerProper cooking of foods to safe internal temperatures is one of the most effective ways to prevent foodborne illnesses. Several types of food thermometers are available for purchase, and choosing the right one when cooking at home will help to keep food safe for your family. This 3-page fact sheet provides specific information on how to use different thermometers in different foods. Written by Claudia L. Peñuela, Amy Simonne, and Isabel Valentin-Oquendo, and published by the UF Department of Family Youth and Community Sciences, March 2012. http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/he770

Mantener los alimentos seguros: Escoger y usar termometros en casa (FCS1083Span/FY1296)

Bimetálico de lectura instantánea“La cocción apropiada de los alimentos a la temperatura interna segura es una de las formas más efectivas de prevenir las enfermedades transmitidas por los alimentos. Existe una gran variedad de termómetros para comprar y seleccionar el correcto para cuando cocine en casa de manera que usted y su familia estén seguros. Esta publicación proveerá información específica de cómo usar los diferentes termómetros en diferentes alimentos.” This 3-page fact sheet was written by Claudia Peñuela, Amarat Simonne e Isabel Valentin-Oquendo, and published by the UF Department of Family Youth and Community Sciences, September 2012.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fy1296

Should We Go Organic? (FAR8048/FM357)

crate of organic produce“Choosing what to feed my family is no easy task. In addition to seeking meals that can be ready for our harried schedules and differing tastes, today when I go to the grocery store I also have to make decisions about whether or not to buy organically grown or raised foods. Many consumers worry that pesticides used in conventionally grown produce may increase our risk of cancer. But is this concern based in reality?” This 2-page fact sheet was written by Kate Welch, Linda Bobroff, and Amy Simonne, and published by the UF Department of Family Youth and Community Sciences, August 2012.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fm357

Keeping Food Safe: Special Tips for Potluck Parties (FCS8999/FY1287)

potluckPotluck parties are very popular in the United States because they allow people to share responsibility of cooking and food preparation. While it’s wonderful to be able to share favorite recipes with friends and to have the opportunity to eat a variety of foods without much cost, potluck meals are also associated with an increased risk of foodborne illness. To decrease your risk of foodborne illness, itis very important to follow the “two-hour rule” and refrigerate all prepared foods within two hours of purchasing or cooking. Read this 2-page fact sheet for more potluck food safety tips. Written by Claudia Peñuela and Amarat Simonne and published by the UF Department of Family Youth and Community Sciences, March 2012.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fy1287

Keeping Food Safe: Shopping and Transporting Foods (FCS80003/FY1290)

grocery shoppingGrocery shopping can be an entertaining activity, but effective shopping involves lots of planning and organization, depending on individual needs and choices in different grocery stores. Good planning and organization can save money and time. Have you ever wondered if you follow safe food handling practices when you buy and transport food? Follow the key guidelines in this 2-page fact sheet to protect yourself and your family! Written by Claudia Peñuela and Amarat Simonne, and published by the UF Department of Family Youth and Community Sciences, March 2012.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fy1290

Keeping Food Safe: Preparing and Cooking (FCS80001/FY1288)

woman chopping vegetablesFood preparation and cooking can be fun and rewarding for many reasons. Well-prepared meals can save money and meet nutritional needs, and making safe and healthy meals a part of your lifestyle can contribute to lower healthcare costs. But many people with busy schedules find it difficult to make time to cook meals. And when we are rushed, we may not pay close attention to good food safety practices. It is very important to follow food safety guidelines during food preparation and cooking in order to reduce the risk of foodborne illness for you and your loved ones. Read this 3-page fact sheet to learn more about food safety during food preparation and cooking. Written by Claudia Peñuela and Amarat Simonne and published by the UF Department of Family Youth and Community Sciences, March 2012.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fy1288

Manteniendo los alimentos seguros: Almacenamiento apropiado (FCS80002Span/FY1294)

kitchenSegún el Centro de Prevención y Control de Enfermedades (CDC, por sus siglas en inglés), el almacenamiento inapropiado de los alimentos es uno de los principales riesgos para la seguridad alimentaria que por cierto es fácil de prevenir. ¿Se ha preguntado si está almacenando de forma apropiada y segura los alimentos? Compare sus prácticas con las siguientes guías. This 2-page fact sheet was written by Claudia Peñuela and Amarat Simonne, and published by the UF Department of Family Youth and Community Sciences, March 2012.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fy1294