Controlled-Release and Slow-Release Fertilizers as Nutrient Management Tools

UF/IFAS recommends nutrient management practices that will reduce harmful nitrate levels in the river, springs and groundwaterThere are many fertilizer sources available for commercial crop production. The characteristics of each fertilizer type determine whether its use poses an advantage or a disadvantage to a farmer. This 6-page fact sheet focuses on how to select the right fertilizer to enhance profitability and satisfy best management practices (BMPs). Written by Guodong Liu, Lincoln Zotarelli, Yuncong Li, David Dinkins, Qingren Wang, and Monica Ozores-Hampton, and published by the UF Department of Horticultural Sciences, October 2014. (UF/IFAS Photo by Thomas Wright)
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1255

Bush Snapbean Production in Miami-Dade County, Florida

Figure 1. Snapbean production on calcareous, very gravelly loam soils in Miami-Dade County. Credit: Monica Ozores-HamptonMiami-Dade County is the primary production region for fresh-market bush snapbeans with 57% or 18,696 acres of the Florida bean acreage. Production costs vary from $16.53 to $21.87 per 30 lb. bushel or $4,046 to $4,711 per acre. Acceptable yields range from 185 to over 300 bushels per acre. Snapbeans produced in Miami-Dade County are sold nationwide for the fresh market starting just before Thanksgiving and continuing through the winter and spring months. This 9-page fact sheet was written by S. Zhang, D. Seal, M. Ozores-Hampton, M. Lamberts, Y. Li, W. Klassen, and T. Olczyk, specifically for growers in Miami-Dade County as a supplement to The Vegetable Production Handbook for Florida (SP170). Published by the UF Department of Horticultural Sciences, July 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/tr005

Conversions of parts per million on soil test reports to pounds per acre

soil samples for analysis at the UF/IFAS ESTLSoil testing and the resulting fertilization recommendations are critical for appropriate nutrient management in commercial vegetable production, but growers and soil experts sometimes speak different languages. This 8-page fact sheet provides a simple conversion method for crop consultants, crop advisors, growers, students, and researchers who are interested in nutrient and water management of crop production. Written by Guodong Liu, Yuncong Li, and Aparna Gazula, and published by the UF Department of Horticultural Sciences, August 2013.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1229

Using Tensiometers for Vegetable Irrigation Scheduling in Miami-Dade County (ABE326/TR015)

Figure 1. Example of a tensiometer's vacuum gauge.A tensiometer is a simple and relatively inexpensive tool that can be used to schedule irrigation in Miami-Dade County vegetable crops. Tensiometers continuously measure soil water potential or tension. If the tension in the soil is high, plants have to use more energy to extract soil water. If tension in the soil is low, then plants have lower energy requirements to extract soil water. This 6-page fact sheet was written by Kati W. Migliaccio, Teresa Olczyk, Yuncong Li, Rafael Muñoz-Carpena, and Tina Dispenza, and published by the UF Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering, December 2012.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/tr015

Understanding and Applying Chelated Fertilizers Effectively Based on Soil pH (HS1208)

Figure 2. Schematic diagram of chelated fertilizers facilitating nutrient uptake for foliar application. Without chelation (aqua), micronutrients stay on the leaf surface. With chelation (aqua surrounded by blue), micronutrients first move into the mesophyll and then release micronutrients. Plant nutrients are one of the environmental factors essential for crop growth and development. Nutrient management is crucial for optimal productivity in commercial crop production. Those nutrients in concentrations of ≤ 100 parts per million (ppm) in plant tissues are described as micronutrients and include iron (Fe), zinc (Zn), manganese (Mn), copper (Cu), boron (B), chlorine (Cl), molybdenum (Mo), and nickel (Ni). Micronutrients such as Fe, Mn, Zn, and Cu are easily oxidized or precipitated in soil, and their utilization is, therefore, not very efficient. Chelated fertilizers have been developed to increase micronutrient utilization efficiency. This 5-page fact sheet provides an overview of chelated fertilizers and considerations for their use to county Extension faculty, growers, and students who are interested in commercial crop production. Written by Guodong Liu, Edward Hanlon, and Yuncong Li, and published by the UF Department of Horticultural Sciences, November 2012.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1208

Are Phosphorous and Phosphoric Acids Equal Phosphorous Sources for Plant Growth? (HS1010/HS254)

Figure 1.  Downy mildew on lettucePhosphorus (P) is one of the 17 elements essential for plant growth and development, and is also a key component in some agrochemicals, such as phosphorous acid. Thus, there are two types of P closely associated with crop production. The similarity of terms such as phosphoric acid and phosphorous acid may create some confusion as to the actual content and efficacy of these products. This 7-page fact sheet explains what phosphorous acid is and examines both its fungicidal activity and nutrient value. Written by Asha M. Brunings, Guodong Liu, Eric H. Simonne, Shouan Zhang, Yuncong Li, and Lawrence E. Datnoff, and published by the UF Department of Horticultural Sciences, March 2012.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs254

Irrigation Scheduling for Tropical Fruit Groves in South Florida (TR001)

Figure 3. Tensiometer installed in very gravelly loam soil. Irrigation scheduling can be accomplished using different tools, each with its benefits and weaknesses. It is critical to use each tool as it is intended to ensure tropical fruit trees have the irrigation water they need. This 6-page fact sheet was written by K. W. Migliaccio and Y. C. Li, and published by the UF Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering, February 2012.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/tr001

Controlled-Release Fertilizers for Potato Production in Florida (HS941/HS187)

Red Potatoes.The recent emphasis on the development of vegetable production best management practices has prompted a re-examination of fertilization practices in Florida potato production in the St. Johns River watershed. The numbers provided in this 5-page fact sheet serve as a starting point for discussion about the value of using controlled-release fertilizers, which can be a win-win-win opportunity for producers, manufacturers, and regulatory agencies by helping all meet their production, business, and environmental goals. Written by Guodong Liu, Eric H. Simonne, Yuncong Li, Chad M. Hutchinson, Mark Warren, and Steven Lands, and published by the UF Department of Horticultural Sciences, October 2011. (UF/IFAS Photo by Tyler Jones)
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs187

Nickel Nutrition in Plants (HS1191)

This 5-page fact sheet introduces agricultural and horticultural producers to the role and function of the newest identified essential plant nutrient, nickel (Ni). Written by Guodong Liu, E. H. Simonne, and Yuncong Li, and published by the UF Department of Horticultural Sciences, June 2011.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1191

Evolution of water quality regulations in the United States and Florida (AE431)

Water is essential to sustain life. Not only do we all need a certain quantity of water each day, but the quality of the available water is also critical. Water quality protection in the United States evolved from initially ensuring navigability of waterways to protecting our natural ecosystems. This 5-page fact sheet provides a background for understanding water quality and how it is evaluated and regulated in the U.S. with particular focus on the state of Florida. Written by Kati W. Migliaccio, Yuncong Li, and Thomas A. Obreza. Published by the UF Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering, January 2011.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ae431

ABE368/AE396 South Florida Tropical Fruit Grower Perspectives: Water Conservation Management Practices

Revised! ABE368, a 6-page fact sheet by Kati W. Migliaccio, Jonathan H. Crane, Edward Evans, Bruce Schaffer, Yuncong Li, and Rafael Muñoz-Carpena, presents results of fruit grower responses from a survey designed to assess changing views of agricultural producers in Miami-Dade county from 2006 to 2009 regarding water quantity and quality management practices — methods, demographics, water quality and quantity opinions concerning lifestyle, agriculture, and best management practices (BMPs). Includes references. Published by the UF Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering, November 2009.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/AE396

SL289/SS502 Wetland Delineation: An Overview of Regulations and Methods

SL289, a 4-page illustrated fact sheet by Daniel L. Irick, Yuncong Li, and Alan L. Wright, describe the regulatory nature of wetland delineation and classification for landowners, wetland and soil scientists, and the
general public. Includes references. Published by the UF Department of Soil and Water Science, May 2009.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/SS502

SL306/TR003 Sunn Hemp – A Cover Crop in Florida

Revised! SL-306 (formerly SS-AGR-96), a 4-page illustrated fact sheet by Yuncong Li, Qingren Wang, Waldemar Klassen, Edward A. Hanlon, Jr., describes this green manure crop that has been grown for centuries in Southeast Asia — origin and distribution, description, uses, production and harvest, and seed production. Includes references. Published by the UF Department of Soil and Water Sciences, August 2009.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/TR003

HS1156 Review of Nutrient Management Systems for Florida Vegetable Producers

HS1156, a 17-page white paper from the UF/IFAS Vegetable Fertilizer Task Force, identifies differences between actual fertilization practices and UF/IFAS fertilizer recommendations, especially for vegetables grown with subsurface (Central and South Florida) and overhead (Miami-Dade County) irrigation. The recommendations of the VFTF aim at bridging the gaps between science-based results and the diversity in production systems found in the Florida vegetable industry. Includes references. Published by the UF Department of Horticultural Sciences, April 2009.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/HS1156

TR001 Irrigation Scheduling for Tropical Fruit Groves in South Florida

TR001, a 6-page illustrated fact sheet by Kati W. Migliaccio and Yuncong Li, describes why irrigation is needed in south Florida, and the advantages and disadvantages of various tools available for determining an optimum irrigation schedule. Includes references. Published by the UF Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering, January 2009.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/TR001