Feral Swine Trapping: Techniques and Designs

Feral hogs resemble domestic hogs, but are usually leaner

Feral swine are an invasive or nuisance species in Florida and most other states because their incessant rooting is ruinous to natural and agricultural habitat. They loosen the soil, destroy native vegetation, and modify the natural chemistry and nutrients of the soil, causing widespread destruction in natural ecosystems, agricultural areas, livestock pastures, and residential areas. They also carry numerous diseases, some of which are transmittable to wild and domestic animals and humans. Trapping and removing swine from your property is an effective way to reduce or control feral swine populations. This 9-page fact sheet written by Bethany Wight and Raoul K. Boughton and published by the UF/IFAS Wildlife Ecology and Conservation Department describes the most commonly used trapping techniques and illustrates several trap and gate designs.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/uw440

Frogs and Toads of Northern Belize

Red-eyed treefrog (Agalychnis callidryas) Mike Rochford, UF/IFAS

Belize is home to several threatened frog species. One of them, the Maya mountains frog, lives nowhere else in the world. This 4-page fact sheet written by Jenna M. Cole, Sarah K. Cooke, Venetia S. Briggs-Gonzalez, Justin R. Dalaba, and Frank J. Mazzotti and published by the UF/IFAS Wildlife Ecology and Conservation Department will help you identify your frogs and toads in order to better protect them.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/uw439

The Cane or "Bufo" Toad (Rhinella marina) in Florida

Cane toad (Bufo marinus)

Cane toads are an invasive species in Florida and in many countries around the world. They have been established in Florida since the 1950s. Cane toads are larger and more poisonous than Florida’s native toads; they can be fatal to dogs that try to eat them, and they may be harmful to Florida’s native species. Discover the history of cane toads in Florida and learn to distinguish them from native toads. Find out the impacts they can have on both ecosystems and people, and get tips on how to deal with them in yards and neighborhoods in this 6-page publication written by Steve Johnson and Audrey Wilson and published by the Wildlife Ecology and Conservation Department.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/uw432

Reducing Human-Bear Conflicts: Bear-Resistant Trash Cans

Elina Garrison grad assistant holds an armful of bearcubs.

The Florida black bear (Ursus americanus floridanus) is the only species of bear in Florida, with an estimated population of approximately 4,030 bears. Bears that eat garbage put themselves in danger. This 3-page fact sheet written by Ethan T. Noel, Elizabeth F. Pienaar, and and Mike Orlando and published by the Wildlife Ecology and Conservation Department explains how to secure human garbage from bears so that they don’t become reliant on human food sources, a condition that puts them at great risk of being killed from vehicle collisions, illegal shooting, or euthanasia.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/uw429

Securing Bird Feeders from Florida Black Bears

bear snacks at birdfeeder

The Florida black bear (Ursus americanus floridanus) is the only species of bear in Florida, with an estimated population of approximately 4,030 bears. Bears are excellent climbers and can access bird feeders that are suspended from trees. This 3-page fact sheet written by Ethan T. Noel and Elizabeth F. Pienaar and published by the Wildlife Ecology and Conservation Department explains how to secure bird seed from bears so that they don’t become reliant on human food sources, a condition that puts them at greater risk of being killed from vehicle collisions, illegal shooting, or euthanasia.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/uw430

Building for Birds Evaluation Tool: Breeding and Wintering Habitat for Forest Birds

A woodpecker on an oak tree.  UF/IFAS Photo: Thomas Wright.

Several bird species use forest fragments and trees conserved in built areas as breeding, wintering, and stopover habitat. Scientists have created a Building for Birds online tool to help these birds and the people who appreciate them. This evaluation tool is most useful for small developments or developments in already fragmented landscapes.

The tool is designed for use when no opportunity is available to conserve large forest areas of 125 acres or more within a proposed development. Developers are sometimes reluctant to conserve trees and forest fragments in subdivided residential/commercial areas because it costs time and money, but there is value in this conservation effort not only for many different species of forest birds, but for future homeowners waking to birdsong in the mornings.

This 17-page fact sheet written by Mark Hostetler and Jan-Michael Archer and published by the Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation describes the online tool and shows how it can help preserve breeding and wintering habitat for migrating birds.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/uw417

Freshwater Fish of New River, Belize

bay snook

Belize is home to an abundant diversity of freshwater fish species and is often considered a fishing paradise. The New River area is a popular freshwater fishing destination in the Orange Walk district of northern Belize. Here locals and visitors alike take to the lagoons and waterways for dinner or for good sportfishing. This 3-page guide written by Venetia Briggs-Gonzalez, Kyle Allen, and Frank J. Mazzotti and published by the Wildlife Ecology and Conservation Department highlights the most popular species in the area and will help people identify and understand these species.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/uw406

Facts about Wildlife Diseases: Leprosy

nine-banded armadillo
Worldwide, 250,000 new cases of leprosy are reported each year, and in the United States, approximately 150 new cases of leprosy are diagnosed each year. Also known as Hansen’s disease, leprosy (Mycobacterium leprae) is a bacterial disease that infects the skin and nerves, causing disfiguring skin sores, nerve damage, and occasionally lung damage if left untreated. Leprosy is spread between humans via respiratory droplets when people sneeze or cough. In the southeast United States, handling armadillos is thought to be the source of many infections. This 4-page fact sheet written by Shannon P. Moore and Samantha M. Wisely and published by the Wildlife Ecology and Conservation Department describes the disease in humans and armadillos and explains how to avoid it and limit its spread.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/uw408

Conservation Subdivision: Post-construction Phase: Creating Signs to Educate Residents

sign
Installing educational signs is one way to increase awareness and participation in conservation activities. This six-page fact sheet written by Mark Hostetler and published by the Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation explains how to create educational signs and install them in residential neighborhoods as a way to inform residents about biodiversity conservation. The fact sheet, one of the UF/IFAS Conservation Subdivision series, explains how to design effective signs, how to manage a series of signs to keep the information fresh, and how to maintain the signs to ensure that residents and visitors to the community continue to benefit and maintain their homes, yards, and neighborhoods sustainably for years to come.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/uw407

Rancher Perceptions of the Coyote in Florida

Figure 1. Coyotes are common throughout Florida. Credit: W. M. Giuliano

Throughout the continental United States and large portions of Canada and Central America, changes people make to the landscape such as the clearing of forested land and the extermination of larger predators like gray and red wolves have made the environment perfect for the adaptive coyote. Coyotes have rapidly taken advantage of these environmental shifts and expanded into new areas, now including all 67 counties in Florida and even Key Largo. Each year more people in Florida catch a glimpse of a coyote crossing a road or running across open fields, or notice coyote scat along a hiking trail–and farmers and ranchers are seeing signs of coyotes on their farms.

As coyotes become a fixture of the Florida landscape, potential grows for conflict with humans. Coyotes are in Florida to stay, and understanding the agricultural community’s perception of their influence on livestock and wildlife is important to developing effective policies for coyote management. This 4-page fact sheet written by Raoul K. Boughton, Bethany Wight, and Martin B. Main and published by the Wildlife Ecology and Conservation Department provides results of ongoing statewide surveys of ranchers in Florida regarding the influence of coyotes on their operations.

http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/uw143

Safe Harbor Agreement: A Regulatory Assurance under the Endangered Species Act

Red cockaded woodpecker
The involvement of the private sector is critical for the conservation and recovery of many species, but landowners’ fears that increased management restrictions could keep them from enjoying their land can present a challenge to securing their trust and assistance in conservation efforts. A Safe Harbor Agreement is a regulatory assurance that removes the risk of additional regulation in the future and encourages landowners to maintain important habitat on their lands. This three-page publication written by Melissa M. Kreye, Elizabeth F. Pienaar, Raoul K. Boughton, and Lindsey Wiggins and published by the Wildlife Ecology and Conservation Department provides Extension agents, decision-makers, and landowners with a basic understanding of a landowner’s obligations and the benefits of enrolling.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/uw403

The Argentine Black and White Tegu in South Florida: Population Growth, Spread, and Containment

Argentine black and white tegu (Salvator merianae)
Robin Bijlani, University of Florida

Florida is home to more nonnative species of reptiles and amphibians than anywhere else in the world because of its subtropical climate, large areas of disturbed habitats, and thriving trade in exotic pets. Although pythons have received the majority of public attention, invasive lizards also pose a significant threat to south Florida’s native wildlife and ecosystems, and a good example is the Argentine black and white tegu. Learn more about this exotic lizard in this 3-page fact sheet written by Rebecca G. Harvey and Frank J. Mazzotti and published by the Wildlife Ecology and Conservation Department.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/uw405

Biology of the Hicatee: A Critically Endangered River Turtle of Belize

Juvenile hicatee inside shell of adult

The hicatee (Dermatemys mawii) is a Central American river turtle and one of the 25 most endangered turtle species in the world. Over-hunting for meat, eggs, and shells is driving the turtles toward extinction. This 3-page fact sheet about the hicatee includes its natural history, reproductive habits, and ecology and describes the international conservation efforts to save the fascinating but fast-disappearing turtle. Written by Venetia Briggs-Gonzalez, Nathan Schwartz, Rebecca G. Harvey, and Frank J. Mazzotti and published in November 2015 by the Wildlife Ecology and Conservation Department.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/uw404

Facts about Wildlife Diseases: Rabies

dog getting rabies shotRabies is a virus carried by mammals. It kills infected humans and animals if they are not treated shortly after exposure. Rabies can be prevented, but it cannot be cured once symptoms become evident. This 6-page fact sheet explains how rabies spreads, which animals can get it, how common it is, symptoms, what you can do to limit its spread and what to do in case of a possible rabies exposure. Written by Samantha M. Wisely and Holly K. Ober, and published by the UF Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation, June 2015.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/uw282

Managing Conflicts with Wildlife: Living with Deer

Figure 1. Male Florida white-tailed deer.

Though deer rarely pose problems for people, it is important to understand the issues associated with deer and human-deer interactions.  This 4-page fact sheet describes the biology of Florida’s white-tailed deer, the hazards associated with deer, and how to minimize these risks. Written by William M. Giuliano, Holly K. Ober, Lauren Watine, and Raoul Boughton, and published by the UF Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation, December 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/uw398

Managing Conflicts with Wildlife: Living with Coyotes

Figure 1. Coyotes are common throughout Florida. Credit: W. M. GiulianoThe omnivorous coyote is a relative newcomer to Florida that plays an important role in ecosystems and food webs. Of particular importance and possible benefit may be their potential ability to control populations of pest species such as some rodents. Although rare, there are situations where coyotes can become dangerous or damaging. In this 4-page fact sheet, we present some facts about coyotes, describe dangers and problems they may cause, and provide suggestions on how to cope with these issues. Written by Lauren Watine, William M. Giuliano, Holly K. Ober, Raoul Boughton, Alexander Gulde, Angeline Scotten, and published by the UF Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation, December 2014. (Photo: W. M. Giuliano, UF/IFAS)
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/uw397

Managing Conflicts with Wildlife: Living with Panthers

Figure 1. A Florida pantherPanthers help maintain populations of some native species and control nuisance species such as wild hogs. They are generally secretive and rarely bother people, but there are rare situations where panthers can become dangerous or damaging. In this 4-page fact sheet, we present some facts about panthers, describe dangers and problems they may cause, and provide suggestions on how to cope with these issues. Written by William M. Giuliano, Holly K. Ober, Lauren Watine, Raoul Boughton, Eric Hellgren, Darrell Land, and Mark Lotz, and published by the UF Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation, December 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/uw399

Managing Conflicts with Wildlife: Living with Wild Hogs

Figure 1. A foraging wild hog Credit: M.S. SmithWild hogs are a popular species, pursued and hunted by many throughout Florida. They are also an important food source for the endangered Florida panther.
But there are situations where they can become dangerous or damaging. In this 4-page fact sheet, we present some facts about hogs, describe dangers and problems they may cause, and provide suggestions on how to cope with these issues. Written by William M. Giuliano, Holly K. Ober, Lauren Watine, Raoul Boughton, and Don Coyner, and published by the UF Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation, December 2014. (Photo: M.S. Smith)
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/uw400

Managing Conflicts with Wildlife: Living with Bears

Figure 1.  The Florida black bear. Credit: www.myfwc.comBlack bears are omnivorous, enigmatic animals that help maintain healthy forests by dispersing seeds of plants they eat. Bear watching is a favorite pastime for many Floridians throughout the state. Bears are generally secretive and rarely a problem for people. But there are rare situations where they can become dangerous or damaging. In this 4-page fact sheet, we present some facts about bears, describe dangers and problems they may cause, and provide suggestions on how to cope with these issues. Written by William M. Giuliano, Holly K. Ober, Lauren Watine, Eric Hellgren, Raoul Boughton, and Dave Telesco, and published by the UF Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation, December 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/uw396

Managing Conflicts with Wildlife: Living with Alligators

alligatorAmerican alligators are found in only 10 states in the southeastern U.S. In most situations alligators do not harm people, but they can pose potential dangers to people in some situations. In this 3-page fact sheet, we present some facts about alligators, describe their potential threats to people and pets, and provide suggestions on how to cope with these risks. Written by Holly K. Ober, Harry J. Dutton, Allan R. Woodward, Lindsay J. Hord, and William M. Giuliano, and published by the UF Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation, November 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/uw393