Florida’s Geologic History

fossils

Hundreds of millions of years of geologic processes lead to the formation of Florida. This 7-page fact sheet written by Kyle W. Bostick, Shelly A. Johnson, and Martin B. Main and published by the UF/IFAS Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation describes the 3 primary processes that created Florida as we know it today: plate tectonics, carbonate production, and siliciclastic invasion, as well as major processes like sea-level change that continue to reform the morphology of the Florida Platform today.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/uw208

Did I See a Panther?

Florida panther and kittens courtesy Florida Fish and Wildlife Commission

Florida panthers can sometimes be confused with bobcats, dogs, and coyotes. This 4-page fact sheet written by Diane J. Episcopio, Elizabeth F. Pienaar, and Martin B. Main and published by the UF/IFAS Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation describes how to identify panthers by their physical characteristics and their tracks and explains what to do if you have seen a panther.
edis.ifas.ufl.edu/uw144

Improving, Restoring, and Managing Natural Resources on Rural Properties in Florida: Sources of Financial Assistance

small farm in North Florida, sky, clouds, barn, cows,  beef cattle, trees, grass, pasture. UF/IFAS Photo: Thomas Wright.

Interested in conserving natural resources, such as wildlife habitat, or protecting the agricultural heritage of your land? Both federal and state governments have technical and financial assistance programs to help rural landowners achieve natural resource goals. These challenges are addressed through land rentals, technical assistance, cost-shares, and incentive payments and include both time-limited and permanent land-use options.

This 8-page fact sheet written by Chris Demers, Martin B. Main and Mark E. Hostetler and published by the UF School of Forest Resources and Conservation informs landowners about government programs available to help conserve natural resources.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fr156

Rancher Perceptions of the Coyote in Florida

Figure 1. Coyotes are common throughout Florida. Credit: W. M. Giuliano

Throughout the continental United States and large portions of Canada and Central America, changes people make to the landscape such as the clearing of forested land and the extermination of larger predators like gray and red wolves have made the environment perfect for the adaptive coyote. Coyotes have rapidly taken advantage of these environmental shifts and expanded into new areas, now including all 67 counties in Florida and even Key Largo. Each year more people in Florida catch a glimpse of a coyote crossing a road or running across open fields, or notice coyote scat along a hiking trail–and farmers and ranchers are seeing signs of coyotes on their farms.

As coyotes become a fixture of the Florida landscape, potential grows for conflict with humans. Coyotes are in Florida to stay, and understanding the agricultural community’s perception of their influence on livestock and wildlife is important to developing effective policies for coyote management. This 4-page fact sheet written by Raoul K. Boughton, Bethany Wight, and Martin B. Main and published by the Wildlife Ecology and Conservation Department provides results of ongoing statewide surveys of ranchers in Florida regarding the influence of coyotes on their operations.

http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/uw143

Attracting Backyard Birds: Bird Feeder Selection (WEC162/UW192)

Today, more than 50 million Americans put out a billion pounds of bird food each year. Bird feeders can be used to supplement the food provided by native plantings. They also provide a way to observe birds at close range. This 8-page fact sheet suggests useful guidelines for selecting feeders, food, feeder location, cleaning feeders, and managing for cats and squirrels. Written by Emma V. Willcox, Mark E. Hostetler, Martin B. Main, and Maena Voigt, and published by the UF Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation, April 2011.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/uw192

Bats of Florida (WEC186/UW203)

Nocturnal habits, affinity for eerie places, and silent, darting flight have made bats the subjects of a great deal of folklore and superstition through the years. Given their ability to function in the dark when and where humans cannot, it is no wonder that bats have long been associated with the supernatural. Bats remain poorly understood even today. This revised 5-page fact sheet describes the species of bats that occur in Florida and provides simple tips for their identification. It was written by Holly K. Ober, Martin B. Main, and Ginger M. Allen and published by the UF Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation, November 2010.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/uw203

WEC284/UW329 Conservation Subdivision: Construction Phase – Native Landscaping Palette

WEC284, a 9-page illustrated fact sheet by Mark Hostetler and Martin B. Main, discusses the importance of emphasizing native plants when selecting a landscape palette. Includes references. Published by the UF Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation, May 2010.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/uw284

WEC264/UW309 Florida’s Wading Birds

WEC-264, an 11-page illustrated fact sheet by Grant C. Sizemore, Martin B. Main, and Elise V. Pearlstine, provides an overview of some of the most majestic of Florida's birds — taxonomy and status, cranes and flamingos, identification, feeding behavior, diet, breeding, movements, and conservation. Includes references. Published by the UF Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation, July 2009.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/UW309

SSFOR23/FR156 Improving, Restoring, and Managing Natural Resources on Rural Properties in Florida: Sources of Financial Assistance

Revised! SS-FOR-23, an 11-page fact sheet by Chris Demers, Martin B. Main and Mark E. Hostetler, inform landowners about government programs available to help conserve natural resources. Includes references. Published by the UF School of Forest Resources and Conservation, September 2009.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/FR156

WCE137S/UW294 Efectos del fuego en la vida Silvestre de Florida y su hábitat

WEC-137-S, a 5-page illustrated fact sheet by Martin B. Main and George W. Tanner, is the Spanish language version of WEC137/UW132 Effects of Fire on Florida’s Wildlife and Wildlife Habitat. It addresses concerns regarding the use of prescribed fire to manage wildlife habitat in Florida. Includes references. Published by the UF Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation, January 2009.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/UW294