Using iNaturalist to Contribute Your Nature Observations to Science.

Florida panther and kittens courtesy Florida Fish and Wildlife Commission

iNaturalist is one of the most popular citizen science data portals in the world. Citizens can submit pictures of biological observations to an online data base to be reviewed by the rich online community and used for important biodiversity research around the world. Users can use the iNaturalist ap to plan community projects and bioblitzes and learn more about species identification and biodiversity. In this 5-page fact sheet, authors Matthew Earl Boone and Mathieu Basille explain how observations are vetted and used and give a step by step guide to get started! Published by the UF/IFAS Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/uw458

Wildlife of Florida Factsheet: Nine-banded Armadillo

Joe Schaefer and an armadillo UF/IFAS photo

Learn more about nine-banded armadillos!

The Wildlife of Florida Factsheet series was created to provide the public with a quick, accurate introduction to Florida’s wildlife, including both native and invasive species. Authors Simon Fitzwilliam and Raoul Boughton hope this 2-page quick guide and others in the series published by the UF/IFAS Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation will inspire readers to investigate wildlife in their own backyards and communities and understand the amazing biodiversity of wildlife in the state of Florida.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/uw456

Bats of Florida Poster

Evening bat (Nycticeius humeralis) from Texas. Portraits, Vespertilionidae, E North America to N Mexico

This poster, created by Meghan E. Lauer and Holly K. Ober and published by the UF/IFAS Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation shows photographs of the 13 species of bats that are resident to Florida. Text associated with each photo tells the common and scientific name of each species, as well as information on the types of structures in which each commonly roosts.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/uw457

Wildlife of Florida Factsheet: Northern Bobwhite Quail

quail Steve Maslowski, USFWS

The Wildlife of Florida Factsheet series was created to provide the public with a quick and accurate introduction to Florida’s wildlife, including both native and invasive species. Authors Tyler Buckley and Raoul Boughton hope this 2-page fact sheet published by the UF/IFAS Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation will inspire people to learn more about the northern bobwhite quail and understand the amazing biodiversity of wildlife in general in the state of Florida and in their own backyards and communities.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/uw455

Wildlife of Florida Factsheet: Northern Crested Caracara

The distinct yellow-orange face and black crest of the northern crested caracara. Isabel Gottlieb

The Wildlife of Florida Factsheet series was created to provide the public with a quick and accurate introduction to Florida’s wildlife, including both native and invasive species. Authors Elizabeth Rose and Raoul Boughton hope this 2-page fact sheet published by the UF/IFAS Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation will inspire people to learn more about the northern crested caracara and understand the amazing biodiversity of wildlife in general in the state of Florida and in their own backyards and communities.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/uw452

How to Promote Purple Martins in North Florida

Purple martin housing should be located in open, grassy areas with no tall trees and should be mounted with a system that enables housing to be lowered for nest checks and maintenance. Photo by Pam Winegar.

Purple Martins are highly social, cavity-nesting birds. In the Eastern United States, a shortage of natural housing options has left these fascinating and attractive birds completely dependent on man-made housing. Author Holly K. Ober tested seven commercially available martin houses to determine what is best for martins in north Florida and provides recommendations in this 4-page fact sheet published by the UF/IFAS Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/uw450

Facts About Wildlife Diseases: Eastern Equine Encephalitis

mosquito
The Eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV) causes Eastern equine encephalitis (EEE) disease in birds, humans, horses, and other animals in the eastern United States, including Florida, which is especially receptive to the virus because of its freshwater hardwood swamps and wetlands, which provide good niches for the mosquito vectors of the disease. This 5-page fact sheet written by Samantha Wisely and Karen Hood and published by the UF/IFAS Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation describes the disease and includes strategies for limiting its spread.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/uw453

Florida’s Geologic History

fossils

Hundreds of millions of years of geologic processes lead to the formation of Florida. This 7-page fact sheet written by Kyle W. Bostick, Shelly A. Johnson, and Martin B. Main and published by the UF/IFAS Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation describes the 3 primary processes that created Florida as we know it today: plate tectonics, carbonate production, and siliciclastic invasion, as well as major processes like sea-level change that continue to reform the morphology of the Florida Platform today.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/uw208

Did I See a Panther?

Florida panther and kittens courtesy Florida Fish and Wildlife Commission

Florida panthers can sometimes be confused with bobcats, dogs, and coyotes. This 4-page fact sheet written by Diane J. Episcopio, Elizabeth F. Pienaar, and Martin B. Main and published by the UF/IFAS Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation describes how to identify panthers by their physical characteristics and their tracks and explains what to do if you have seen a panther.
edis.ifas.ufl.edu/uw144

Securing Pet Food from Florida Black Bears and Coyotes

Elina Garrison grad assistant holds an armful of bearcubs.

The Florida black bear and the coyote are both prevalent throughout the state of Florida. The number one cause of human-wildlife conflict for these two species are food attractants, including pet food. This 2-page fact sheet written by Kelley C. Anderson and Elizabeth F. Pienaar and published by the UF/IFAS Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation explains how to secure pets and pet food against both the Florida black bear and the coyote and keep people, pets, and wildlife safe.
edis.ifas.ufl.edu/uw437

Status of Capybaras (Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris Rodentia: Hydrochaeridae) and Potential for Establishment in Florida

capybara out for a stroll

Would you know what to do if you saw a two-foot-tall, 100-pound exotic rodent strolling through your neighborhood? It’s highly unlikely, but, depending on your location, not absolutely impossible. Capybaras, the world’s largest rodents, are native to South America but have been spotted in the state of Florida and may have potential to establish populations here. This 5-page fact sheet written by Brandon Parker, C. Jane Anderson, Christina Romagosa, Samantha Wisely, Daniel Pearson, John Seyjagat, and Katherine Ashley Sayler and published by the UF/IFAS Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation describes capybaras, explains how they got to Florida, and shows where the semiaquatic, herbivorous rodents have been sighted so far.
edis.ifas.ufl.edu/uw438

Building for Birds Evaluation Tool: Built Areas as Habitat for Forest Birds

A male Cardinal at a birdbath, sprinkler, and birdfeeder. Extension calendar 2007.  UF/IFAS Photo: Thomas Wright

A variety of forest birds will use trees and shrubs in built areas as breeding, wintering, and stopover habitat. Scientists have created an online tool to help these birds and the people who appreciate them. This 20-page fact sheet written by Mark Hostetler and Jan-Michael Archer and published by the UF/IFAS Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation describes the online tool and shows how it can help forest birds.
edis.ifas.ufl.edu/uw418

Florida's Bats: Southeastern myotis

southeastern myotis

The southeastern myotis is a small forest- and cave-dwelling bat that lives in Florida. Unlike many other species in Florida, southeastern myotis have long hairs between their toes that extend past their claws. You can learn to distinguish the southeastern myotis from other bats commonly found in Florida in this three-page fact sheet written by Emily Evans, Terry Doonan, and Holly Ober and published by the UF/IFAS Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/uw433

Florida's Bats: Tricolored Bat

Tricolored bat (Perimyotis subflavus) from Tennessee.

The tricolored bat, formerly known as the eastern pipistrelle, is the smallest bat found in the state of Florida. It weighs just about as much as a nickel and a penny. Because of their small size and erratic flight pattern, tricolored bats are often mistaken for moths when seen in flight from a long distance away. You can learn to distinguish the tricolored bat from other bat species found in Florida with this three-page fact sheet written by Emily Evans, Terry Doonan, and Holly Ober and published by the UF/IFAS Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/uw434

Florida's Bats: Evening Bat

Evening bat (Nycticeius humeralis) from Texas. Portraits, Vespertilionidae, E North America to N Mexico
Copyright Marvin G. Tuttle

The evening bat is a relatively small, forest-dwelling bat. Evening bats are dark brown to yellow with short brown ears and a broad, hairless muzzle. This species looks like the big brown bat but is noticeably smaller. Learn to distinguish evening bats from big brown bats and other common Florida species of bats in this three-page fact sheet written by Emily Evans, Terry Doonan, and Holly Ober and published by the UF/IFAS Department of Wildlife, Ecology and Conservation.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/uw435

Land Trusts in Florida: A Brief Guide to Land Trusts

Figure 1. A Florida panther

A land trust is a private nonprofit organization that owns and manages land to protect its natural, economic, and cultural value. Land trusts may also educate the public about local conservation efforts. This two-page factsheet written by Benjamin W. North and Elizabeth F. Pienaar and published by the UF/IFAS Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation explains the important role land trusts play and provides tips on how to establish a land trust to protect land in your community.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/uw436

Climate Changes, Shifting Ranges: Climate change effects on wildlife in the Florida Everglades and Keys

Doe and fawn Florida Key deer foraging on palmetto scrub.

Where do the animals go when the sea rises? Learn the probable futures of Florida panthers and other south Florida wildlife in this 5-page fact sheet. Written by Larry Perez, James I. Watling, David Bucklin, Mathieu Basille, Frank J. Mazzotti, Stephanie Romañach, and Laura Brandt and published by the UF Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation, it explains how a changing climate could impact wild animals.
edis.ifas.ufl.edu/uw428

Building for Birds Evaluation Tool: Forest Fragments Used as Stopover Sites by Migrant Birds

Western meadowlark perched on a fence post near Ona, Florida. UF/IFAS Photo by Tyler Jones.

Several bird species use forest fragments and trees conserved in built areas as breeding, wintering, and stopover habitat. Scientists have created a Building for Birds online tool to help these birds and the people who appreciate them. This evaluation tool is most useful for small developments or developments in already fragmented landscapes.

The tool is designed for use when no opportunity is available to conserve large forest areas of 125 acres or more within a proposed development. Developers are sometimes reluctant to conserve trees and forest fragments in subdivided residential/commercial areas because it costs time and money, but there is value in this conservation effort not only for many different species of forest birds, but for future homeowners waking to birdsong in the mornings.

This 18-page fact sheet written by Mark Hostetler and Jan-Michael Archer and published by the Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation describes the online tool and shows how it can help preserve stopover habitat for migrating birds.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/uw416

Trueperella (Arcanobacterium pyogenes) in Farmed White-Tailed Deer

A fawn at a private deer farm. Photo by Tyler Jones taken on 10-13-15

Trueperella is a harmless bacterium in intestinal tracts of ruminants like deer, cattle, and pigs, but if it migrates out of the intestine to other areas of an animal’s body and proliferates, it can make the animal sick. Trueperella causes many problems in deer, including lesions, abscesses, and pneumonia, and it is one of the types of bacteria that is known to contribute to the disease lumpy jaw. In young fawns, it is a common cause of death. This 3-page fact sheet written by Kathryn D. Pothier, Katherine A. Sayler, and Samantha M. Wisely and published by the Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation explains how to spot and treat trueperella, or, better yet, prevent it in the first place.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/uw427