Wildlife of Florida Factsheet: Nine-banded Armadillo

Joe Schaefer and an armadillo UF/IFAS photo

Learn more about nine-banded armadillos!

The Wildlife of Florida Factsheet series was created to provide the public with a quick, accurate introduction to Florida’s wildlife, including both native and invasive species. Authors Simon Fitzwilliam and Raoul Boughton hope this 2-page quick guide and others in the series published by the UF/IFAS Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation will inspire readers to investigate wildlife in their own backyards and communities and understand the amazing biodiversity of wildlife in the state of Florida.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/uw456

Wildlife of Florida Factsheet: Northern Bobwhite Quail

quail Steve Maslowski, USFWS

The Wildlife of Florida Factsheet series was created to provide the public with a quick and accurate introduction to Florida’s wildlife, including both native and invasive species. Authors Tyler Buckley and Raoul Boughton hope this 2-page fact sheet published by the UF/IFAS Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation will inspire people to learn more about the northern bobwhite quail and understand the amazing biodiversity of wildlife in general in the state of Florida and in their own backyards and communities.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/uw455

Wildlife of Florida Factsheet: Northern Crested Caracara

The distinct yellow-orange face and black crest of the northern crested caracara. Isabel Gottlieb

The Wildlife of Florida Factsheet series was created to provide the public with a quick and accurate introduction to Florida’s wildlife, including both native and invasive species. Authors Elizabeth Rose and Raoul Boughton hope this 2-page fact sheet published by the UF/IFAS Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation will inspire people to learn more about the northern crested caracara and understand the amazing biodiversity of wildlife in general in the state of Florida and in their own backyards and communities.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/uw452

Safe Harbor Agreement: A Regulatory Assurance under the Endangered Species Act

Red cockaded woodpecker
The involvement of the private sector is critical for the conservation and recovery of many species, but landowners’ fears that increased management restrictions could keep them from enjoying their land can present a challenge to securing their trust and assistance in conservation efforts. A Safe Harbor Agreement is a regulatory assurance that removes the risk of additional regulation in the future and encourages landowners to maintain important habitat on their lands. This three-page publication written by Melissa M. Kreye, Elizabeth F. Pienaar, Raoul K. Boughton, and Lindsey Wiggins and published by the Wildlife Ecology and Conservation Department provides Extension agents, decision-makers, and landowners with a basic understanding of a landowner’s obligations and the benefits of enrolling.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/uw403

Managing Conflicts with Wildlife: Living with Coyotes

Figure 1. Coyotes are common throughout Florida. Credit: W. M. GiulianoThe omnivorous coyote is a relative newcomer to Florida that plays an important role in ecosystems and food webs. Of particular importance and possible benefit may be their potential ability to control populations of pest species such as some rodents. Although rare, there are situations where coyotes can become dangerous or damaging. In this 4-page fact sheet, we present some facts about coyotes, describe dangers and problems they may cause, and provide suggestions on how to cope with these issues. Written by Lauren Watine, William M. Giuliano, Holly K. Ober, Raoul Boughton, Alexander Gulde, Angeline Scotten, and published by the UF Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation, December 2014. (Photo: W. M. Giuliano, UF/IFAS)
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/uw397

Managing Conflicts with Wildlife: Living with Deer

Figure 1. Male Florida white-tailed deer.

Though deer rarely pose problems for people, it is important to understand the issues associated with deer and human-deer interactions.  This 4-page fact sheet describes the biology of Florida’s white-tailed deer, the hazards associated with deer, and how to minimize these risks. Written by William M. Giuliano, Holly K. Ober, Lauren Watine, and Raoul Boughton, and published by the UF Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation, December 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/uw398

Managing Conflicts with Wildlife: Living with Panthers

Figure 1. A Florida pantherPanthers help maintain populations of some native species and control nuisance species such as wild hogs. They are generally secretive and rarely bother people, but there are rare situations where panthers can become dangerous or damaging. In this 4-page fact sheet, we present some facts about panthers, describe dangers and problems they may cause, and provide suggestions on how to cope with these issues. Written by William M. Giuliano, Holly K. Ober, Lauren Watine, Raoul Boughton, Eric Hellgren, Darrell Land, and Mark Lotz, and published by the UF Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation, December 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/uw399

Managing Conflicts with Wildlife: Living with Wild Hogs

Figure 1. A foraging wild hog Credit: M.S. SmithWild hogs are a popular species, pursued and hunted by many throughout Florida. They are also an important food source for the endangered Florida panther.
But there are situations where they can become dangerous or damaging. In this 4-page fact sheet, we present some facts about hogs, describe dangers and problems they may cause, and provide suggestions on how to cope with these issues. Written by William M. Giuliano, Holly K. Ober, Lauren Watine, Raoul Boughton, and Don Coyner, and published by the UF Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation, December 2014. (Photo: M.S. Smith)
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/uw400

Managing Conflicts with Wildlife: Living with Bears

Figure 1.  The Florida black bear. Credit: www.myfwc.comBlack bears are omnivorous, enigmatic animals that help maintain healthy forests by dispersing seeds of plants they eat. Bear watching is a favorite pastime for many Floridians throughout the state. Bears are generally secretive and rarely a problem for people. But there are rare situations where they can become dangerous or damaging. In this 4-page fact sheet, we present some facts about bears, describe dangers and problems they may cause, and provide suggestions on how to cope with these issues. Written by William M. Giuliano, Holly K. Ober, Lauren Watine, Eric Hellgren, Raoul Boughton, and Dave Telesco, and published by the UF Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation, December 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/uw396