Rootstocks for Florida Stone Fruit

Rootstocks are used in many tree fruit systems to provide growth advantages and/or pest and disease resistance without affecting (sometimes improving) productivity and fruit quality. This 6-page document discusses the use of rootstocks for Florida stone fruit. Written by Ali Sarkhosh, Mercy Olmstead, Jose Chaparro, and Thomas Beckman and published by the UF/IFAS Horticultural Sciences Department, November 2018.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs366

Irrigation Practices for Peaches in Florida

This 6-page document provides basic information and guidelines on water requirements and irrigation strategies for peaches grown in Florida. Written by C. Zambrano-Vaca, L. Zotarelli, K. Migliaccio, R. Beeson Jr., K. Morgan, J. Chaparro, and M. Olmstead and published by the UF/IFAS Horticultural Sciences Department, April 2018.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1316

Florida Subtropical Peaches: Production Practices

Figure 6. Weed control within the tree row. Subtropical peach production includes many practices, such as site selection, orchard design, and disease, weed, and insect management through to harvest. Florida’s subtropical climate allows growers to harvest their crops early, but it creates challenges for the long postharvest growing season. This 14-page fact sheet covers the breadth of topics related to subtropical peach production, including a monthly timeline of recommended practices. Written by M. Olmstead, J. Chaparro, J. G. Williamson, R. Rouse, R. Mizell, P. Harmon, and J. Ferguson, and published by the UF Department of Horticultural Sciences, August 2013.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs348

Florida Peach and Nectarine Varieties

Figure 6. ‘Gulfking'The University of Florida has developed high-quality, low-chilling, early-maturing peach and nectarine cultivars that can be grown from the panhandle of Florida to as far south as Immokalee. Low-chilling cultivars can grow and produce fruit under Florida conditions that are much warmer in winter than in northern states. Furthermore, ripening of these cultivars during April and May ensures an early spring market window for tree-ripe fresh fruit in Florida before peaches and nectarines from other southeastern states and California come to market. Both commercial and dooryard recommended varieties span the growing season. This 8-page fact sheet was written by Mercy Olmstead, Jose Chaparro, Pete Andersen, Jeff Williamson, and James Ferguson, and published by the UF Department of Horticultural Sciences, May 2013.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/mg374

Rootstocks for Florida Stone Fruit (HS1110/HS366)

Figure 2. Budded peach tree with red-leaved 'Flordaguard' rootstock suckersRootstocks have been used in many tree fruit systems to provide growth advantages or pest or disease resistance without affecting productivity and fruit quality. In Florida, stone fruit are grown on rootstocks that specifically provide pest resistance to the peach root-knot nematode. Although several root-knot nematode-resistant rootstocks are available for stone fruit grown in other locations and climates, ‘Flordaguard’ peach rootstock is currently recommended for stone fruit production in Florida. This 5-page fact sheet was written by M. Olmstead, J. Chaparro, and J. Ferguson, and published by the UF Department of Horticultural Sciences, November 2012.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs366

Alternative Opportunities for Small Farms: Peach and Nectarine Production Review (RFAC018/AC018)

PeachFlorida produces some of the earliest commercial-quality peaches and nectarines in North America. During the last 10 years, many new, improved peach and nectarine cultivars have been released by the University of Florida. They have increased the potential for expansion of commercial peach and nectarine acreage throughout much of the Florida peninsula and along the Gulf Coast regions of the southeastern United States. This 3-page fact sheet was written by Mercy Olmstead, Jeff Williamson, Jose Chaparro, and Tim Crocker, and published by the UF Department of Horticultural Sciences, September 2011.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ac018