Integrated Management of Non-Native Plants in Natural Areas of Florida

Air potato. Invasive yam species, perennial vine, poison plants. UF/IFAS Photo: Thomas Wright.

While natural areas are conservation lands that have been set aside for the purpose of preserving (or restoring) native plant and animal communities, they do require active management. One of the greatest management issues in natural areas is invasive plants. This 35-page publication provides land managers in Florida with current methods used to manage non-native plants. Written by Stephen F. Enloe, Ken Langeland, Jason Ferrell, Brent Sellers, and Greg MacDonald, and published by the UF/IFAS Agronomy Department, revised July 2018.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/wg209

Herbicide Residues in Manure, Compost, or Hay

Compost bin.

When purchasing compost, it is important to understand that some manure-based products can contain herbicide residues that can affect the growth of certain plants. Manure from animals that have been fed forage treated with aminopyralid or other closely related herbicides, such as clopyralid or picloram, can be contaminated with these herbicides, which severely restrict the growth of legume and solanaceous crops and other broadleaf plants. This 3-page fact sheet discusses aminopyralid, compost, questions to ask when purchasing bulk compost or mulch, conducting a bioassay, aminopyralid injury symptoms, and steps to consider if contaminated manure or compost has been added to a garden or field site. Written by Jason Ferrell, Peter Dittmar, and Brent Sellers, and published by the UF Agronomy Department, May 2017.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ag416

Spiderwort Control in Hay Fields and Pastures

Spiderwort can be easily identified by its clusters of colorful flowers with three petals.
Spiderwort is a native perennial species found throughout the eastern half of the US. The plant’s large, fleshy stem creates problems for hay production. This 2-page fact sheet provides a brief overview of the plant as well as information on control through herbicide use. Written by Michael Durham, Jason Ferrell, and Brent Sellers, and published by the UF Agronomy Department, May 2016.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ag407

Creeping Indigo, A Poisonous Plant of Concern in Florida Pastures

Flowers of creeping indigo arise from the base of the leaves and are pink to salmon in color.A recent rise in suspected horse poisonings has brought new attention to creeping indigo (Indigofera spicata), a toxic plant which has reportedly been in Florida for as long as 90 years. This new 5-page fact sheet covers plant description, signs of creeping indigo toxicity, and roles of creeping indigo’s toxins, as well as treatment and management. Written by Robert MacKay, Ed Jennings, Brent Sellers, Jason Ferrell, and Amanda House, and published by the UF Department of Agronomy, August 2015.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ag399