Field Identification of Citrus Canker Symptoms and Decontamination Procedures (PP214/PP136)

necrotic canker lesions on grapefruit
Citrus canker, caused by the bacterial pathogen Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri, is a serious disease of citrus. The disease causes necrotic dieback, general tree decline, premature fruit drop, and fruit blemishes. Severely infected trees become weak, unproductive, and unprofitable. Learn how to identify citrus canker and proper procedures for decontamination with this 5-page fact sheet written by Mongi Zekri, Megan Dewdney, Jamie Yates, and Pamela Roberts, and published by the UF Department of Plant Pathology, July 2011.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/pp136

Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) Reference Guide for Low-Volume Ground Citrus Applicators (CH203)

wearing goggles with a half-face respiratorThis 2-page fact sheet provides a table describing personal protective equipment requirements for several products used in citrus production. Written by S.H. Futch, L.L. Stelinski, M.E. Rogers, and J.D. Yates, and published by the UF Department of Horticultural Sciences, July 2011.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ch203

Identification of Early Citrus Black Spot Symptoms (Identificacíon de los Síntomas Iniciales de la Mancha Negra de los Cítricos) (PP285)

thumbnail of PP285This bilingual identification sheet was designed to assist packinghouse employees to identify the early yet subtle symptoms of citrus black spot. Proper identification of citrus black spot prevents the rejection of international fruit shipments. Written by M. M. Dewdney, J. D. Yates, and M. A. Ritenour and published by the UF Department of Plant Pathology, July 2011.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/pp285

Citrus Black Spot: No Longer an Exotic Disease (PP281)

Citrus black spot is an emerging fungal disease that affects Florida citrus. Various symptom types occur about a month before harvest. Black spot has the potential to cause major economic damage to the fresh fruit industry and significant yield loss on processing varieties. This trifold brochure was written by Megan Dewdney and Jamie Yates, and published by the UF Department of Plant Pathology, January 2011.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/pp281

Exotic Citrus Diseases: Early Detection is the Solution to Protecting Florida Citrus (CH202)

This revised illustrated trifold brochure provides key information about Pseudocercospora fruit and leaf spot, sweet orange scab, citrus leprosis virus, citrus variegated chlorosis (CVC), and citrus tristeza virus (CTV) stem pitting. Includes contact information for UF/IFAS Extension citrus experts. Written by R. H. Brlansky, M. M. Dewdney, and J. D. Yates, and published by the UF Department of Plant Pathology, June 2010.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ch202

HS1184 Packinghouse Citrus Black Spot ID / Identificación de la Mancha Negrade los Cítricos en las Plantas de Procesamiento

HS1184, a one-page identification sheet in English and Spanish by Mark Ritenour, Megan Dewdney, Natalia Peres, and Jamie Yates, assists packinghouse graders in the detection of citrus black spot. Published by the UF Department of Horticultural Sciences, August 2010.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1184

PP277 Citrus Black Spot Management Timing Schedule

PP277, a 2-page illustrated handout by Megan M. Dewdney and Jamie D. Yates, provides a condensed version of citrus black spot management recommendations and application timings for various citrus fungal diseases. Published by the UF Department of Plant Pathology, July 2010.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/pp277

PP270 Foliar Fungal Disease Management for Commercial Citrus Groves

PP270, a 2-page illustrated fact sheet by Megan M. Dewdney and Jamie D. Yates, highlights symptoms and management for greasy spot, melanose, alternaria brown spot, and citrus scab for commercial citrus groves. Published by the UF Department of Plant Pathology, August 2009.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/PP270

PP269 Phytophthora Management for Commercial Citrus Groves

PP269, a 2-page full-color fact sheet by Megan M. Dewdney and Jamie D. Yates, highlights symptoms and management for phytophthora foot rot, brown rot, phytophthora root rot, and diaprepes root weevil in citrus groves. Published by the UF Department of Plant Pathology, August 2009.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/PP269

CH201 Scouting for Citrus Greening: Scouting Today to Protect Future Profits

CH201, a 2-page trifold brochure by J.D. Yates, S.H. Futch, and T.M. Spann, highlights the purpose of scouting, frequency, methods, grove conditions, tagging suspect trees, scout responsibilities, safety concerns, diagnostics, and what to scout for. Includes contact information for UF/IFAS Extension citrus experts. Published by the UF Department of Horticultural Sciences, August 2008.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/CH201

CH202 Exotic Citrus Diseases: Early Detection is the Solution to Protecting Florida Citrus

CH202, a 2-page illustrated trifold brochure by J.D. Yates, M.M. Dewdney and R.H. Brlansky, is best viewed in pdf format. It provides key information about citrus blackspot, sweet orange scab, citrus leprosis virus, citrus variegated chlorosis (CVC), and citrus tristeza virus (CTV) stem pitting. Includes contact information for UF/IFAS Extension citrus experts. Published by the UF Department of Plant Pathology, November 2008.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/CH202

PP262 Phytophthora-Related Citrus Diseases Identification Sheet1

PP262, a 2-page illustrated identification sheet by Megan Dewdney and Jamie D. Yates, can be used to identify four Phytophthora-related diseases of citrus–phytophthora foot rot, brown rot, phytopththora root rot, and diaprepes root weevil. Published by the UF Department of Plant Pathology, March 2009.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/PP262

PP261 Citrus Foliar Fungal Diseases

PP261, a 2-page illustrated identification sheet by Megan M. Dewdney and Jamie D. Yates, can be used to identify four fungal diseases in citrus: Alternaria Brown Spot, Citrus Scab, Greasy Spot and Melanose. Published by the UF Department of Plant Pathology, March 2009.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/PP261

HS1147/CH200 Scouting for Citrus Greening

HS-1147, a 6-page illustrated fact sheet by Jamie D. Yates, Stephen H. Futch, and Timothy M. Spann, describes when to scout; different methods of scouting and their applications; symptoms of greening and how to distinguish these symptoms from those of other diseases/disorders; and what to do when a
greening-infected tree is identified. Includes references. Published by the UF Department of Horticultural Sciences, August 2008.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/CH200