Handbook of Florida Water Regulation: 2016 Florida Water Bill

Lemon trees with micro irrigation system. Photo Credits: UF/IFAS Photo by Tyler Jones

This handbook is designed to provide an accurate, current, and authoritative summary of the principal federal and state laws that directly or indirectly relate to agriculture. Written by Tatiana Borisova, Michael T. Olexa, and Jarrett Davis and published by the UF/IFAS Food and Resource Economics Department, this chapter of the handbook provides a basic overview of the Florida Water Bill.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fe1018

Handbook of Florida Water Regulation: Florida Springs and Aquifer Protection Act

Lemon trees with micro irrigation system. Photo Credits: UF/IFAS Photo by Tyler Jones

This handbook is designed to provide an accurate, current, and authoritative summary of the principal federal and state laws that directly or indirectly relate to agriculture. Written by Tatiana Borisova, Michael T. Olexa, and Jarrett Davis and published by the UF/IFAS Food and Resource Economics Department, this chapter of the handbook provides a basic overview of the Florida Springs and Aquifer Protection Act.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fe1019

Handbook of Florida Water Regulation: Soil and Water Conservation Districts

Figure 1. A photo of Lake Okeechobee, looking out over the western marsh region to the open waters of the large lake. Credit: South Florida Water Management District

This 2-page fact sheet written by Michael T. Olexa, Tatiana Borisova, and Jarrett Davis and published by the UF/IFAS Food and Resource Economics Department is part of a handbook designed to provide an accurate, current, and authoritative summary of the principal federal and Florida state laws that govern agriculture. This chapter provides an overview of soil and water conservation districts (SWCDs), explains their purpose and structure, and describes some of the agency partnerships SWCDs make.
edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fe1017

Collaborative Planning for the Future of Water Resources in Central Florida: Central Florida Water Initiative

suburban landscape

Rules and regulations that govern our use of natural resources, specifically water, are changing. Over the past 80 years, Florida’s population increased four times, from approximately 5 million to more than 20 million people. With this population increase, water needs have also increased. Forward-looking communities think about the future of their towns, counties, or the state as they work on redefining regulations to meet future water needs without harming our springs, lakes, rivers, and estuaries. This 4-page fact sheet written by James Fletcher and Tatiana Borisova and published by the Food and Resource Economics Department discusses the Central Florida Water Initiative, which deals with advancing water-use and water-resource-protection strategies for Orlando and its vicinity.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fe1012

Estimating Benefits of Residential Outdoor Water Conservation: A Step-by-Step Guide

This 9-page fact sheet written by Tatiana Borisova, Laura A. Warner, Jennison Searcy, Anil Kumar Chaudhary, and Michael Dukes and published by the UF Department of Food and Resource Economics in February 2017 was developed to help Extension agents, water-conservation managers, and homeowners estimate the economic benefits of residential outdoor water conservation. It provides guidance for reporting benefits, including lowered utility bills for homeowners, reduced water-delivery costs for utilities, and increased water supply. This publication also offers an example of an impact statement.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fe1009

Frost Protection Irrigation for Florida Peaches: Economic Considerations

peach
Peach production in Florida is increasing in importance, and the peach industry is growing rapidly in the state, where the early harvest and early market window allow the prices for Florida peaches to be high compared to those received by producers in the other southeastern states. Reduction in peach production costs would allow Florida peach producers to increase their net revenues. This 7-page fact sheet describes a strategy for limiting water use for frost protection of peach trees in the winter to reduce producers’ costs, protect lakes and streams, and reinforce the public image of farmers as innovators and environmental stewards. Written by Tori Bradley, Tatiana Borisova, and Mercy Olmstead and published by the Food and Resource Economics Department.
edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fe980

Improving the Precision of Blueberry Frost Protection Irrigation

Private blueberry farm in Alachua County, frozen, frost, crops.
In Florida, early-ripening southern highbush blueberry cultivars allow growers to take advantage of high prices in the early market before other states can compete with higher volumes of berries sold at lower prices. That advantage comes with a vulnerability, however, because frosts can reduce gains. Florida growers rely on strategies like cold protection irrigation to reduce their risk of loss due to cold damage. This 9-page article by Tatiana Borisova, Tori Bradley, Mercy Olmstead, and Jeffrey Williamson describes a UF/IFAS study comparing precision cold protection irrigation to uniform cold protection irrigation to estimate the potential savings in diesel costs and water withdrawal volumes associated with the two practices and help protect Florida’s valuable and vulnerable blueberry harvest. Published by the Food and Resource Economics Department in November 2015.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fe979

Economic Contributions and Ecosystem Services of Springs in the Lower Suwannee and Santa Fe River Basins of North-Central Florida

children view manatees at a springThis study examined the economic contributions, consumer surplus, and ecosystem services provided by recreational use of fifteen major springs sites in north central Florida. The estimated annual economic contributions of springs-related recreational spending in north-central Florida for FY 2012/13 are summarized. Among the findings, there was $84.2 million in total visitor spending for springs recreation, and 1,160 full- and part-time jobs. This 4-page fact sheet was written by Tatiana Borisova, Alan W. Hodges, and Thomas J. Stevens, and published by the UF Department of Food and Resource Economics, April 2015.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fe958

Economic Value of the Services Provided by Florida Springs and Other Water Bodies: A Summary of Existing Studies

Springs at Ichetucknee Springs State Park.  Water, vegetation, spring, nature.  UF/IFAS Photo by Tyler Jones.Florida residents and visitors place a high value on aquatic natural resources. This 8-page fact sheet reviews nine studies that demonstrate that Florida’s springs have a very large economic value, both for recreation and resource conservation. In these studies, economists measure the value of ecosystem services in dollar terms to assist management decisions concerning natural resources. Willingness to pay studies show that people who benefit from Florida springs place a high value on them. Economic contribution studies show that Florida springs play a significant role in local and state economic health and job creation. Written by Sara Wynn, Tatiana Borisova, and Alan Hodges, and published by the UF Department of Food and Resource Economics, November 2014. (UF/IFAS Photo by Tyler Jones.)
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fe959

Factors Affecting the Choice of Irrigation Systems for Florida Tomato Production

four red tomatoesSeveral economic factors should be considered in selecting an agricultural irrigation system. This 7-page fact sheet compares two widely used irrigation systems for tomato production: seepage and sub-surface drip irrigation. Written by Jenna Rogers, Tatiana Borisova, Jeffrey Ullman, Kelly Morgan, Lincoln Zotarelli, and Kelly Grogan, and published by the UF Department of Food and Resource Economics, October 2014. (UF/IFAS Photo: Tyler Jones)
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fe960

Florida Strawberry Producers' Experiences with Anthracose and Botrytis Fruit Rot, and Producers' Use of the Strawberry Advisory System

Figure 1. Anthracnose lesions on a ripe fruit (Mertely and Peres 2012)Florida’s producers use fungicides to manage anthracnose and botrytis fruit rot diseases, which find favorable growth conditions in Florida’s climate and can reduce strawberry yields and profits. The Strawberry Advisory System (SAS) uses information about weather conditions and user-entered information about past fungicide applications to evaluate the potential spread of these diseases in strawberry fields. If the risk of disease spread is low, no fungicide application is recommended, allowing producers to save on fungicide application costs. In this study, we summarize the results of a 2012/2013 survey of strawberry producers, and focus on the questions, How significant is the impact of anthracnose and botrytis on Florida strawberry producers’ yields? What are the typical fungicide application frequencies used by the producers? What percent of strawberry producers use SAS? and Are there any effects of SAS subscription on producers’ fungicide application? This 4-page fact sheet was written by Tatiana Borisova, Zhengfei Guan, Ekaterina Vorotnikova, Natalia Peres, and John VanSickle, and published by the UF Department of Food and Resource Economics, October 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fe957

Costs and Benefits of More Efficient Irrigation Systems for Florida Chipping Potato Production

potatoesThe goal of this 11-page fact sheet is to help producers and other interested parties understand how alternative irrigation systems can affect economic outcomes in agricultural operations. We used chipping potato production in the Hastings area in northeast Florida as an example to discuss factors to consider when selecting an irrigation system. Written by Jenna Rogers, Tatiana Borisova, Lincoln Zotarelli, Kelly Grogan, Jeffrey Ullman, Jessica Bertine, and Kelly Morgan, and published by the UF Department of Food and Resource Economics, September 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fe953

Water Withdrawals and Their Use in Florida in 2010

boy drinking water from hoseThis publication is based on Florida water use information collected by the United States Geological Service. It expands on EDIS document FE797 that examined Florida water withdrawals data for 2005. In addition, in EDIS document FE757 (Florida’s Water Resources), the authors describe Florida’s abundant water resources—the state receives about 54 inches of rainfall per annum, compared to 30 inches nationwide, and it overlies prolific aquifers. Whether water is scarce or abundant, however, depends not only upon available supplies, but also upon patterns of water use. To gather this information, the United States Geological Survey employs several water-use categories to develop estimates of water withdrawals and water use. This 5-page fact sheet was written by Tatiana Borisova and Jenna Rogers, and published by the UF Department of Food and Resource Economics, May 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fe943

Socio-Demographic Characteristics and Concerns about Water Quality Issues of Master Gardener Program Volunteers

Florida Master Gardeners working with childrenTo respond to residents’ informational needs, the Cooperative Extension Service offers a variety of volunteer training and certification programs. Who participates in such programs? What types of audiences are being reached? Do such programs increase knowledge and change behavior of the volunteers? In this article, we attempt to answer these questions by summarizing existing studies and using responses to a regional public survey, and by focusing on the Master Gardener program and surface water quality issues as examples. This 7-page fact sheet was written by Tatiana Borisova, Michael Smolen, Maria Pilar Useche, Jon Calabria, Nickola Sochacka, Damian Adams, Diane Boellstorff, Jason Evans, and Robert Mahler, and published by the UF Department of Food and Resource Economics, May 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fe942

Valuing the Ecosystem Services of Florida‹s Forest Conservation Programs: The Economic Benefits of Protecting Water Quality (FOR309/FR377)

Figure 2. Conceptual model of how economic value estimates of program benefits can be transferred to a new site, or the policy site, using a meta-analysis of willingness-to-pay (WTP) valuation studies.How much are Floridians willing to pay for water quality protection programs that include forest conservation? This 9-page fact sheet reports the results of a study to answer this question, using a benefit transfer approach. Written by Melissa M. Kreye, Francisco J. Escobedo, Damian C. Adams, Taylor Stein, and Tatiana Borisova, and published by the UF Department of School of Forest Resources and Conservation, April 2013.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fr377

Public Opinion about Water Availability (FE845)

Photo of a dripping faucet, to emphesize the amount of water that can be wasted by a leak. Photo: Thomas WrightThis 8-page fact sheet summarizes results of a public survey about Florida water resources. The respondents were asked about the quantity of water in their area, water availability in ten years, the likelihood of prolonged drought, and the effect of climate change on rainfall. Written by Tatiana Borisova and Damian Adams, and published by the UF Department of Food and Resource Economics, March 2012.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fe845

Quick Overview of Extension Programs to Educate Homeowners about Environmentally Friendly Landscape Practices in Florida, South Carolina, and Tennessee (FE892)

homeowners, developer, and UF program coordinators discuss Florida-Friendly LandscapingNationwide, landscape irrigation accounts for more than 7 billion gallons of water per day. But up to 50 percent of this water is wasted due to overwatering, poor irrigation system design, evaporation, or other factors. Additionally, excessive or poorly timed fertilizer application can cause pollution runoff and deterioration of surface and ground water. This 8-page fact sheet presents a quick overview of the Yards and Neighborhoods program that educates homeowners about nine core principles for landscape management. Written by Tatiana Borisova, Katie Giacalone, Ruth Anne Hanahan, and Esen Momol, and published by the UF Department of Food and Resource Economics, August 2011. (UF/IFAS Photo Thomas Wright)
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fe892

A Guide to EPA’s Numeric Nutrient Water Quality Criteria for Florida (SL316/SS528)

This revised 10-page guide provides a basic, concise, and understandable description of the United States Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) numeric nutrient criteria for Florida, the background events that led to its release, some pertinent scientific issues, and implications for the future. Written by Thomas Obreza, Mark Clark, Brian Boman, Tatiana Borisova, Matt Cohen, Michael Dukes, Tom Frazer, Ed Hanlon, Karl Havens, Chris Martinez, Kati Migliaccio, Sanjay Shukla, and Alan Wright, and published by the UF Department of Soil and Water Science, March 2011.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ss528

FE851 Use, Perceptions, and Barriers to Water Conservation Strategies for Florida Water Utilities

FE851, an 18-page illustrated report by Shirish Rajbhanary, Tatiana Borisova, Damian Adams, Dwayne Haynes, and Chris Boyer, presents the results of a 2009–2010 survey of representatives of Florida’s drinking water systems to examine the relative use of conservation strategies by Florida water utilities. Includes references. Published by the UF Department of Food and Resource Economics, September 2010.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fe851

FE844 Public Opinion about Surface Water and Groundwater Quality in Florida

FE844, a 6-page illustrated report by Tatiana Borisova, John Brett, and Cassel Gardner, summarizes the results of a public survey about the quality of surface water and groundwater resources in Florida. Published by the UF Department of Food and Resource Economics, October 2010.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fe844