Tapegrass, Eelgrass, or Wild Celery (Vallisneria americana Michaux): A Native Aquatic and Wetland Plant

Tapegrass, Vallisneria americana. a) Tapegrass underwater meadow. b) Illustrations of male and female plants.

This 5-page document describes the main features of tapegrass and summarizes important habitat requirements for its growth and restoration. Written by Mohsen Tootoonchi, Lyn A. Gettys, and Jehangir H. Bhadha, and published by the UF/IFAS Agronomy Department, September 2019.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ag437

Lost in the Weeds?: A Comprehensive Guide to Florida's Many Non-Native Plant Lists

Air potato (Dioscorea bulbifera) invasion in south Florida (Broward County). Air potato is on the Florida Noxious Weed List. FDACS DPI oversees and enforces this list.

Because researchers and land managers in Florida have been dealing with invasive species for decades, there is an abundance of resources available to the public regarding invasive species. Sometimes, the volume of available information can be confusing. This 6-page document aims to inform the general public, land managers, researchers, local and state policy makers, and others who seek guidance in accessing regulatory and nonregulatory non-native plant lists in the state of Florida. This publication explains the origins of the lists, meaning of inclusion on a particular list, and ways to access each of the lists. Written by Deah Lieurance and Lyn A. Gettys, and published by the UF/IFAS Agronomy Department, August 2019.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ag436

UF/IFAS News Release 10/22/2019: 'Lost in the Weeds?' Guide Sifts Through the Differences Among Non-Native Plant Lists

East Indian Hygrophila: Hygrophila polysperma (Roxb.) T. Anderson

Emergent growth of East Indian hygrophila.

East Indian hygrophila is a submersed aquatic weed that has invaded a number of aquatic systems in the southeastern United States. It is a federally listed noxious weed and a Florida Class II prohibited plant. Established populations of East Indian hygrophila interfere with human uses of bodies of water and disrupt ecosystems by forming dense, impenetrable monocultures that clog the water column, restrict water flow, and create poor habitat for aquatic fauna. This 5-page fact sheet provides an overview of the plant and discusses its habitat and control. Written by Lyn A. Gettys and Stephen F. Enloe, and published by the UF Agronomy Department, December 2016.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ag413

Hydrilla: Florida's Worst Submersed Weed

Hydrilla in a lake
Hydrilla, which was originally introduced to the state as an aquarium plant, was intentionally planted in canals by aquarium plant dealers in the 1950s and quickly escaped cultivation. In addition to being one of the world’s worst aquatic weeds, the species is Florida’s most intensively managed submersed plant. Hydrilla is a federally listed noxious weed and a prohibited aquatic plant in Florida, making cultivation, sale, and possession of the species illegal. This 7-page fact sheet discusses the classification, characteristics, habitat, and management of hydrilla. Written by Lyn A. Gettys and Stephen F. Enloe, and published by the UF Agronomy Department, February 2016.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ag404

Native Aquatic and Wetland Plants: Duck Potato, Sagittaria lancifolia

Duck potato inflorescence.This 3-page fact sheet discusses the classification, description, habitat, propagation, and uses of duck potato, an aquatic perennial that typically grows in swampy ground or standing water in ponds, lakes, streams, and ditches and usually blooms in the spring. Written by Kimberly A. Moore, Luci E. Fisher, Carl J. Della Torre III, and Lyn A. Gettys, and published by the UF Department of Agronomy, December 2015.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ag403

Native Aquatic and Wetland Plants: Cardinal Flower, Lobelia cardinalis

Flowers of cardinal flower.This 3-page fact sheet discusses the classification, description, habitat, propagation, and use of cardinal flower, an aquatic perennial that is commonly found in stream banks and swamps. Written by Kimberly A. Moore, Luci E. Fisher, Carl J. Della Torre III, and Lyn A. Gettys, and published by the UF Department of Agronomy, December 2015.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ag402

Native Aquatic and Wetland Plants: Blue-Eyed Grass, Sisyrinchium angustifolium

Blue-eyed grass inflorescence.This 2-page fact sheet discusses the classification, description, habitat, propagation, and uses of blue-eyed grass, an aquatic perennial native to Florida. Written by Kimberly A. Moore, Luci E. Fisher, Carl J. Della Torre III, and Lyn A. Gettys, and published by the UF Department of Agronomy, December 2015.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ag401

Arrow Arum: Peltandra virginica

Spathe and spadix inflorescence of arrow arum.Arrow arum is a native aquatic and wetland plant that is a welcome addition to water gardens, aquatic ponds, and wetland restoration and mitigation sites. The species is broadly adapted and extremely common throughout Florida, and its perennial nature assures a stellar performance year after year. This new 3-page fact sheet provides an overview of this plant and discusses its distribution, habitat, propagation, and other uses. Written by Kimberly A. Moore, Luci E. Fisher, Carl J. Della Torre III, and Lyn A. Gettys, and published by the UF Department of Agronomy, October 2015.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ag400

Golden Canna: Canna flaccida

Flower of golden canna

Golden canna is a native wetland plant with bright yellow flowers that can be found throughout most of Florida. This 4-page facts sheet details the golden canna’s biology, distribution and habitat, propagation, pests and diseases, and landscaping and other uses. Written by Edward F. Gilman, Carl J. Della Torre III, and Lyn A. Gettys, and published by the UF Department of Environmental Horticulture, June 2015.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fp102

Biology and Management of Graceful Sandmat (Chamaesyce hypericifolia) in Ornamental Crop Production

Graceful sandmat inflorescence.

Graceful sandmat (Chamaesyce hypericifolia) is a problematic weed that often grows in container media in ornamental plant nurseries. This 4-page facts sheet profiles the biology of graceful sandmat and recommends physical, cultural, and chemicals methods for managing the weed in the nursery environment. Written by Theresa Chormanski, Chris Marble, and Lyn Gettys, and published by the UF Department of Environmental Horticulture, June 2015.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep522

Skyflower: Hydrolea corymbosa

Flowers of skyflower

Skyflower is a native wetland plant that produces brilliant blue flowers and can be found throughout Florida. This 4-page facts sheet details skyflower biology, distribution and habitat, propagation, and uses. Written by Lyn A. Gettys and Carl J. Della Torre III, and published by the UF Department of Agronomy, July 2015.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ag397

Biology and Management of Long-Stalked Phyllanthus in Ornamental Crop Production

Figure 3. Long-stalked phyllanthus in flower.

This 5-page fact sheet discusses the characteristics of long-stalked phyllanthus and explains how to control its growth in a nursery environment. Written by Theresa Chormanski, Chris Marble, and Lyn Gettys, and published by the UF Department of Environmental Horticulture, April 2015.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep518

Lemon bacopa: Bacopa caroliniana

Figure 1. Lemon bacopa flower. Credit: Lyn Gettys, UF/IFASLemon bacopa is a native aquatic and wetland plant that is a welcome inclusion in a variety of settings, including water gardens, aquatic ponds, and wetland restoration and mitigation sites. The species is broadly adapted and extremely common throughout Florida, and its perennial nature assures a stellar performance year after year. Although lemon bacopa can be weedy in some situations, it is most often considered a beneficial native plant that brings a number of desirable characteristics to almost any aquatic setting. This 3-page fact sheet was written by Lyn Gettys and Carl J. Della Torre III, and published by the UF Department of Agronomy, April 2015. (Photo: Lyn Gettys, UF/IFAS)
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ag392

Waterhyacinth: Florida's Worst Floating Weed

Figure 1.  Inflorescence of waterhyacinth Credit: Lyn Gettys, UF/IFASWaterhyacinth is one of the world’s worst aquatic weeds and is Florida’s most intensively managed floating plant. Dense mats formed by this species interfere with human uses of water bodies and disrupt ecosystems by preventing penetration of light and oxygen into the water column. This attractive, free-floating aquatic plant grows throughout the year in southern Florida but often dies back during the winter in the northern parts of the state. Waterhyacinth is cultivated as a water garden and pond plant, but cultivation, sale, and possession of this noxious weed is prohibited in Florida. This 5-page fact sheet was written by Lyn A. Gettys, and published by the UF Department of Agronomy, September 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ag385

American Lotus, Yellow Lotus: Nelumbo lutea

Figure 1. Flower and leaves of American lotus.American lotus is an ideal native plant for constructed or restored wetland areas, where it provides shelter, habitat, and food for wildlife. It is an herbaceous aquatic perennial native plant that tolerates a wide range of conditions. The fragrant yellow flowers, huge round leaves, and persistent seed pods borne on stiff stalks high above the water make it both distinctive and visually striking. Native American tribes treated the American lotus as a sacred plant with mystical powers, and many tribes ate the large rhizomes and used parts of the plant for medicinal purposes. This 3-page fact sheet was written by Warner Orozco-Obando and Lyn Gettys, and published by the UF Department of Agronomy, March 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ag380

Rotala: A New Canal Invader in Southern Florida

Figure 1.  Rotala infesting a flood control canal in Naples, Florida  Rotala is a relative newcomer to Florida. Since it was first found in Coral Springs in 1996, it has established large, but mostly isolated, populations throughout the southern regions of Florida. It is especially problematic in Lee and Collier Counties and along the west coast. Extremely dense submersed populations and large thick mats dominate the surface of the water, greatly reducing ecosystem services, because oxygen level and light penetration are hampered. Because the rapid and vigorous growth of rotala inhibits water flow, the ability of infested canals to function properly in flood control systems is greatly hindered. Management of this aquatic weed is a major concern for resource managers. This 4-page fact sheet was written by Lyn A. Gettys and Carl J. Della Torre II, and published by the UF Department of Agronomy, April 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ag381

Constructing Weighted Trailing Hoses for Submersed Aquatic Herbicide Applications (SSAGR352/AG360)

Bottom acre-foot treatment with weighted trailing hoses.Why treat the upper half of the water column when the weeds are only present in the lower half? This 4-page fact sheet describes the benefits of using the “bottom acre-foot method” of applying herbicides with weighted trailing hoses and details the construction of the weighted trailing hose system used by the University of Florida Center for Aquatic and Invasive Plants.
Written by William T. Haller, Lyn A. Gettys, and Margaret S. Glenn, and published by the UF Department of Agronomy, August 2011.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ag360