Manejo de Insectos en Cruciferas (Cultivos de Coles) (Brocoli, Repollo, Coliflor, Col, Col Rizada, Mostaza, Rabano, Nabos)

Figura 2. Larva de la palomilla dorso de diamante. Crédito: Lyle J. Buss, UF/IFAS

Los vegetales conocidos como crucíferas son un grupo de cultivos amplio y cada vez más importante en Florida. Un número de insectos se alimenta exclusivamente de crucíferas y afecta todos los cultivos enlistados en el título.
This thirty-page fact sheet is the Spanish translation of IG150: Insect Management for Crucifers (Cole Crops). Written by S.E. Webb, A. Nino, y H.A. Smith and published by the Entomology and Nematology Department.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ig168

Pest Identification Guide: An Introduction to Thrips

Dorsal view of an adult common blossom thrips, Frankliniella schultzei Trybom.Tiny insects called thrips are difficult to see with the unaided eye but cause very obvious and sometimes ruinous damage to the flowers, buds, and fruit of many important crops. This two-page guide asks and answers the key thrips questions that allow growers to distinguish between chilli thrips, common blossom thrips, and Western flower thrips to more effectively battle against these destructive pests. What does it look like? What is its life cycle? Where is it found? What type of damage does it cause? And, most importantly, who are its natural enemies? Use this guide to help you identify thrips so that you can take effective steps to control them and limit the damage they cause. Written by Nicole Casuso and Hugh Smith with photos by Lyle Buss, Jeff Cluever, Vivek Kumar, P.M.J. Ramakers, Gary Vallad, and Hugh Smith. Published by the Entomology and Nematology Department, UF/IFAS Extension.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/in1058

Thrips in Florida Strawberry Crops

Figure 2. Thrips damage to strawberry. Credit: H. A. SmithStrawberries grown in Florida are attacked by several pests, including flower thrips. Western flower thrips and common blossom thrips (both invasive) can cause damage to strawberries in Florida; but, while the native Florida flower thrips is commonly found in strawberry blossoms, it hasn’t been established that it can cause economic damage to strawberry. This 9-page fact sheet describes thrips damage, characteristics to distinguish among the three species, and methods of control. Written by Jeff D. Cluever, Hugh A. Smith, Joe E. Funderburk, and Galen Frantz, and published by the UF Department of Entomology and Nematology, January 2015. (Photo: H. A. Smith)
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/in1078

Western Flower Thrips (Frankliniella occidentalis [Pergande])

Figure 1. Western flower thrips adult.One of many species of thrips found in Florida, Frankliniella occidentalis is a pest of several crops throughout Florida and the world, causing injury by feeding and by transmission of plant viruses. This 8-page fact sheet was written by Jeffrey D. Cluever, Hugh A. Smith, Joseph E. Funderburk, and Galen Frantz, and published by the UF Department of Entomology and Nematology, April 2015. (Photo: Lyle Buss)
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/in1089

Pest Identification Guides

Created to help growers and crop consultants, private homeowners, Master Gardeners, and the general public identify common arthropod pests and the damage they inflict, each field guide provides photos of the important life stages and crop damage associated with arthropod pests. The text highlights key general morphology and biology, distribution, and natural enemies. Written by Nicole Casuso and Hugh Smith, and published by the UF Department of Entomology and Nematology, October 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/topic_series_pest_identification_guides

Minimizing Honey Bee Exposure to Pesticides

Figure 1. The western honey bee, Apis mellifera, collecting nectar from a flower.Protecting honey bees and other pollinators from pesticide impacts is important to the sustainability of agriculture. Consequently, pesticide applicators must determine if there is a clear hazard to managed or wild populations of bees. Potential exposure of bees to pesticides can vary greatly depending on the type of pesticide, formulation, application method, label restrictions, and other factors. The goal in using a pesticide is to achieve maximum benefit (success) with minimum negative impact, and these factors should always be considered in pesticide selection. This publication is written (1) to help assure the sustainability of both bees and agriculture by informing beekeepers, pesticide users, and the general public about the often complex relationship between pollinators (specifically bees) and pesticides, (2) to offer guidance for improved communication between beekeepers and pesticide users, (3) to offer pollinator risk-reducing strategies for growers and other applicators when using pesticides, and (4) to provide clarity in laws, labeling, and associated definitions. This 14-page fact sheet was written by J. D. Ellis, J. Klopchin, E. Buss, F. M. Fishel, W. H. Kern, C. Mannion, E. McAvoy, L. S. Osborne, M. Rogers, M. Sanford, H. Smith, P. Stansly, L. Stelinski, and S. Webb, and published by the UF Department of Entomology and Nematology, March 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/in1027

Integrated Pest Management in Protected Structures I: Basic Principles and Scouting

Figure 1.  Screen house made with insect-exclusion material.  Credit: Bielinski SantosThe fundamentals of managing pests in protected structures are very similar in many respects to managing pests in field crops. But conditions within a protected structure can be modified to a certain degree to prevent, delay, or even mitigate pest issues. On the other hand, conditions that discourage one group of pests can often favor another. This 7-page fact sheet was written by Hugh A. Smith, Gary E. Vallad, and Bielinski M. Santos, and published by the UF Department of Entomology and Nematology, June 2013.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/in994

Managing Diamide Resistance in Florida Tomato (ENY867/IN978)

tomatoes, Balm, center, fruit, vegetables, flower, Ag Expo 2006. UF/IFAS Photo: Sally Lanigan.As with any insecticide, repeated use of diamide insecticides on successive generations of the same pest may lead to the development of insecticide resistance. In order to avoid the development of resistance to diamides by targeted pests of tomato, group 28 insecticides, including diamides, must be rotated with insecticides possessing different modes of action. This 3-page fact sheet was written by Hugh A. Smith, and published by the UF Department of Entomology and Nematology, February 2013.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/in978

Enemigos naturales y control biologico (ENY866/IN977)

Figure 1. Estadíos de la mariquita común: adulto, pupa y larva (arriba), un conjunto de huevecillos (abajo).Hay muchos insectos benéficos pero solamente hay algunos que son enemigos naturales de plagas. Los enemigos naturales más comunes de encontrar son: mariquitas/tortolitas, crisopas, antocóridos (Orius), ligaéidos, sírfidos, avispas de agallas, hormigas, avispas parasíticas, moscas parasíticas y ácaros depredadores. La importancia relativa varía de acuerdo con cada insecto plaga, el hábitat y la estación o época del año. This 7-page fact sheet was written by Hugh A. Smith y John L. Capinera, traducido por Ana Lucrecia MacVean, and published by the UF Department of Entomology and Nematology, January 2013.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/in977

Cultivos en asocio, diversidad de cultivos y manejo integrado de plagas (ENY862S/IN932)

Figure 5. El valle de Almolonga, Guatemala, en donde muchos cultivos hortícolas son producidos en pequeñas parcelas. La diversidad de cultivos puede reducir la acumulación de ciertas especies. Créditos: Hugh Smith El cultivo en asocio (o cultivo intercalado) es una práctica en donde se siembran diversos cultivos en un mismo campo. Adicionalmente plantas que no son cultivos, tales como las malezas, cultivos rastreros o de cobertura, así como plantas del hábitat, se pueden combinar en el espacio y tiempo para influir en el número de plagas o artrópodos benéficos en un cultivo principal. This 7-page fact sheet was written by Hugh Smith y Oscar Liburd. Traducido por Ana Lucrecia MacVean, and published by the UF Department of Entomology and Nematology, June 2012.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/in932

Intercropping, Crop Diversity and Pest Management (ENY862/IN922)

Squash with living mulch of buckwheat.Growing different crops in the same field and/or planting different crops on the same plot during different times of the year can reduce insect pest populations, increasing beneficial insects, and suppress weeds. In addition, non-crop plants such as weeds, cover crops, and habitat plantings can be combined in space and time to influence numbers of pest and beneficial arthropods on the main crop. This 7-page fact sheet was written by Hugh A. Smith and Oscar E. Liburd, and published by the UF Department of Entomology and Nematology, February 2012.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/in922

Managing Thrips and Tospoviruses in Tomato (ENY859/IN895)

Placing tomato flowers in vials with 70 % alcoholSeveral invasive species of thrips have established in Florida and are causing serious economic losses to vegetable, ornamental, and agronomic crops. Damage to crops results from thrips feeding and egg-laying injury, by the thrips vectoring of plant diseases, the cost of using control tactics, and the loss of pesticides due to resistance. This 12-page fact sheet describes the biology and ecology of thrips and tomato spotted wilt virus, and recommends a management program. Written by Joe Funderburk, Stuart Reitz, Steve Olson, Phil Stansly, Hugh Smith, Gene McAvoy, Ozan Demirozer, Crystal Snodgrass, Mathews Paret, and Norm Leppla, and published by the UF Department of Entomology and Nematology, August 2011.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/in895