2013 Evaluation of In-Furrow and Foliar Fungicides for Disease Control in Peanut in Jay, Florida

peanut fieldThis 10-page fact sheet summarizes the 2013 in-furrow and foliar fungicide programs for control of early and late leaf spot and white mold (southern stem rot) of peanut in Jay, Florida. It shows the effectiveness of 13 fungicide programs for disease control, as compared to no treatment. This data represents only one year and one location, and readers are cautioned that test results should be considered over several locations and years before final conclusions are valid. Written by Darcy E. P. Telenko, John Atkins, and Nick Dufault, and published by the UF Department of Plant Pathology, January 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/pp310

2013 Sweet Corn Variety Performance Trial, Jay, Florida

yellow, white, and mixed ears of cornThis 5-page fact sheet summarizes the 2013 sweet corn variety trial at the UF West Florida Research and Education Center Jay Research farm in Jay, Florida. It shows the performance of fifteen commercial and experimental Sh2 (supersweet) sweet corn varieties. This data only represents one year and one location; test results should be considered over several years and locations before final conclusions are valid. Written by Darcy Telenko, Libby Johnson, and William Wendt, and published by the UF Department of Horticultural Sciences, November 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1236

2013 Evaluation of Non-Irrigated Early-Maturing Cotton Varieties in Jay, Florida

Figure 1.  Cotton Variety Trial in Jay, Florida This report includes a summary of the 2013 early-season cotton Official Variety Trial in Jay, Florida. It shows the performance of 11 cotton varieties. This data represents only one year and one location, and readers are cautioned that test results should be considered over several locations and years before final conclusions are valid. This 5-page fact sheet was written by Darcy Telenko and Michael Donahoe , and published by the UF Department of Agronomy, January 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ag378

Violet Biology and Management in Turf

Figure 1. Violet in grassViolets (Viola spp.) are diverse winter annuals and perennials. Perennials form rhizomes or long stolons. Many have heart-shaped leaves on long petioles and have a rosette growth habit. Some have linear leaves and others have palmate leaves. Flowers are generally purple, but can be white, pink or yellow. They reproduce by seed or, when produced, rhizomes. This 2-page fact sheet was written by Darcy E. P. Telenko, Barry J. Brecke, Ramon Leon, and J. Bryan Unruh, and published by the UF Department of Environmental Horticulture, December 2013.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep496

Spreading Dayflower Biology and Management in Turf

Figure 1. Spreading dayflower. Spreading dayflower (Commelina diffusa) is a succulent annual that produces freely branched smooth stems. Leaves are broadly lance-shaped with closed sheaths. Sheaths are short with a few soft hairs on the upper margin. Flowers have three blue petals in a leaf-like structure open on the margins. Reproduction occurs via seed and stem fragments. This 2-page fact sheet was written by J. Bryan Unruh, Darcy E. P. Telenko, Barry J. Brecke, and Ramon Leon, and published by the UF Department of Environmental Horticulture, December 2013.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep497

Black Medic Biology and Management in Turf

Figure 1.  Black medic Black medic (Medicago lupulina) is a dark green annual with spreading, prostrate growth. Leaves are alternate with three leaflets on square stems. Leaflets are obovate to elliptic, toothed near the tip, and have a small spur on the tip. Bright yellow flowers are produced in tight, compressed clusters at leaf axils. Reproduction occurs via seed in tightly coiled black seed pods. This 2-page fact sheet was written by Barry J. Brecke, Ramon Leon, J. Bryan Unruh, and Darcy E. P. Telenko, and published by the UF Department of Environmental Horticulture, December 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep494

Sedge Biology and Management in Turf

Figure 1. Purple nutsedge Members of the sedge family have leaves that are composed of a blade, sheath, and ligule. The leaf sheath is closed and the ligule is often absent, and when present is tiny. Stem structure is often triangular.This 3-page fact sheet was written by D. E. P. Telenko, Ramon Leon, J. Bryan Unruh, and B. J. Brecke, and published by the UF Department of Environmental Horticulture, December 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep492

Old World Diamond-Flower Biology and Management in Turf

Figure 3. Old world diamond-flower patches in grass.Old world diamond-flower is a smooth, spreading summer annual. It has branched stems with opposite, narrow leaves. Flowers are white, usually with two or more on long stalks extending from the tip of a common long stalk. Flowers occur from midsummer until frost. Reproduction occurs by seed. Found in moist areas, especially areas that have been disturbed. This 2-page fact sheet was written by Darcy E. P. Telenko, Barry J. Brecke, Ramon Leon, and J. Bryan Unruh, and published by the UF Department of Environmental Horticulture, December 2013.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep493

Erect and Prostrate Spurge Biology and Management in Turf

Figure 1. Prostrate spurgeErect and prostrate spurges are erect or upright annuals with branched stems. Leaves are opposite and not equal. Stems produce “milky sap.” A large number of spurge species occur in Florida. Reproduction occurs via seed. This 2-page fact sheet was written by J. Bryan Unruh, Darcy E. P. Telenko, Barry J. Brecke, and Ramon Leon, and published by the UF Department of Environmental Horticulture, December 2013.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep495

2013 Evaluation of Non-Irrigated Mid- to Full-Season Maturing Cotton Varieties in Jay, Florida

Cotton field on the West Florida REC property in Jay. Photo by Eric ZamoraThis report includes a summary of the 2013 mid- to full-season cotton Official Variety Trial in Jay, Florida. It shows the performance of 16 cotton varieties. This data represents only one year and one location, and readers are cautioned that test results should be considered over several locations and years before final conclusions are valid. This 5-page fact sheet was written by Darcy E. P. Telenko and Michael Donahoe, and published by the UF Department of Agronomy, January 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ag377

Weed Biology and Management in Turf series

This series of 1-2 page illustrated fact sheets by J. Bryan Unruh, Darcy E. Partridge-Telenko, and Barry J. Brecke highlight key facts about each weed, and include herbicide options for each variety of Florida turfgrass. Published by the UF Department of Environmental Horticulture, June 2009.

http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/TOPIC_SERIES_Weed_Biology_and_Management_in_Turf