Spreading Dayflower Biology and Management in Turf

Figure 1. Spreading dayflower. Spreading dayflower (Commelina diffusa) is a succulent annual that produces freely branched smooth stems. Leaves are broadly lance-shaped with closed sheaths. Sheaths are short with a few soft hairs on the upper margin. Flowers have three blue petals in a leaf-like structure open on the margins. Reproduction occurs via seed and stem fragments. This 2-page fact sheet was written by J. Bryan Unruh, Darcy E. P. Telenko, Barry J. Brecke, and Ramon Leon, and published by the UF Department of Environmental Horticulture, December 2013.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep497

Violet Biology and Management in Turf

Figure 1. Violet in grassViolets (Viola spp.) are diverse winter annuals and perennials. Perennials form rhizomes or long stolons. Many have heart-shaped leaves on long petioles and have a rosette growth habit. Some have linear leaves and others have palmate leaves. Flowers are generally purple, but can be white, pink or yellow. They reproduce by seed or, when produced, rhizomes. This 2-page fact sheet was written by Darcy E. P. Telenko, Barry J. Brecke, Ramon Leon, and J. Bryan Unruh, and published by the UF Department of Environmental Horticulture, December 2013.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep496

Black Medic Biology and Management in Turf

Figure 1.  Black medic Black medic (Medicago lupulina) is a dark green annual with spreading, prostrate growth. Leaves are alternate with three leaflets on square stems. Leaflets are obovate to elliptic, toothed near the tip, and have a small spur on the tip. Bright yellow flowers are produced in tight, compressed clusters at leaf axils. Reproduction occurs via seed in tightly coiled black seed pods. This 2-page fact sheet was written by Barry J. Brecke, Ramon Leon, J. Bryan Unruh, and Darcy E. P. Telenko, and published by the UF Department of Environmental Horticulture, December 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep494

Sedge Biology and Management in Turf

Figure 1. Purple nutsedge Members of the sedge family have leaves that are composed of a blade, sheath, and ligule. The leaf sheath is closed and the ligule is often absent, and when present is tiny. Stem structure is often triangular.This 3-page fact sheet was written by D. E. P. Telenko, Ramon Leon, J. Bryan Unruh, and B. J. Brecke, and published by the UF Department of Environmental Horticulture, December 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep492

Old World Diamond-Flower Biology and Management in Turf

Figure 3. Old world diamond-flower patches in grass.Old world diamond-flower is a smooth, spreading summer annual. It has branched stems with opposite, narrow leaves. Flowers are white, usually with two or more on long stalks extending from the tip of a common long stalk. Flowers occur from midsummer until frost. Reproduction occurs by seed. Found in moist areas, especially areas that have been disturbed. This 2-page fact sheet was written by Darcy E. P. Telenko, Barry J. Brecke, Ramon Leon, and J. Bryan Unruh, and published by the UF Department of Environmental Horticulture, December 2013.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep493

Erect and Prostrate Spurge Biology and Management in Turf

Figure 1. Prostrate spurgeErect and prostrate spurges are erect or upright annuals with branched stems. Leaves are opposite and not equal. Stems produce “milky sap.” A large number of spurge species occur in Florida. Reproduction occurs via seed. This 2-page fact sheet was written by J. Bryan Unruh, Darcy E. P. Telenko, Barry J. Brecke, and Ramon Leon, and published by the UF Department of Environmental Horticulture, December 2013.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep495

2013 Cotton Defoliation and Harvest Aid Guide

Figure 1.  A cotton plant that has been defoliated for two weeks is shown in this September 2008 photo, taken at the University of Florida's North Florida Research and Education Center in Quincy, FL. Credit: David Wright, UF/IFASIn Florida, cotton requires about 155 days of growth from planting to harvest. Throughout the growing season, growers must make important management decisions about defoliation, boll opening, and regrowth suppression. These factors can affect the quality and storage time if the crop is put into modules. The greatest losses in quality are caused by stain from poorly defoliated plants or regrowth and moisture from green tissue. This 8-page fact sheet was written by R.G. Leon, D. L. Wright and B. J. Brecke, and published by the UF Department of Agronomy, October 2013.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ag188

Weed Management Guide for Florida Lawns

CrabgrassWeeds can be defined as unwanted plants or plants growing out of place. Proper identification and some understanding of how and why weeds are present in a lawn are important when selecting the best control strategy. Knowing whether or not weeds were previously present in a particular area also helps homeowners prepare control measures in the future. Weed control should be a carefully planned and coordinated program. This 8-page fact sheet was written by J.Bryan Unruh, Ramon G. Leon, Barry J. Brecke, and Laurie E. Trenholm, and published by the UF Department of Environmental Horticulture, July 2013.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep141

SSAGR339/AG349 Can Liberty Link Cotton or Soybeans Work in Florida?

SSAGR339, a 3-page illustrated fact sheet by J. Ferrell, B. Brecke, and Clyde Smith, answers questions about the potential use of LibertyLink crops, which are genetically modified to tolerate applications of glufosinate, as part of a control strategy for Palmer amaranth control in cotton and soybeans. Published by the UF Department of Agronomy, January 2011.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ag349

SSAGR338/AG348 Control of Palmer Amaranth in Agronomic Crops

SSAGR338, a 5-page fact sheet by J. Ferrell, B. Brecke, and C. Smith, provides producers with examples of diverse program approaches for managing Palmer amaranth in corn, cotton, peanut and soybean. Published by the UF Department of Agronomy, December 2010.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ag348

SS-AGR-181/AG188 2009 Cotton Defoliation and Harvest Aid Guide

Revised! SS-AGR-181, a 9-page illustrated guide by D. L. Wright and B. J. Brecke, discusses issues producers should consider concerning defoliation and harvest, and makes general recommendations for harvest-aid applications at various stages and conditions. Published by the UF Department of Agronomy, October 2009.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/AG188

Weed Biology and Management in Turf series

This series of 1-2 page illustrated fact sheets by J. Bryan Unruh, Darcy E. Partridge-Telenko, and Barry J. Brecke highlight key facts about each weed, and include herbicide options for each variety of Florida turfgrass. Published by the UF Department of Environmental Horticulture, June 2009.

http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/TOPIC_SERIES_Weed_Biology_and_Management_in_Turf

ENH884/EP141 Weed Management in Home Lawns

Revised! ENH-884, a 9-page fact sheet by J.Bryan Unruh, Barry Brecke, Laurie E. Trenholm, provides homeowners with information to carry out a carefully planned and coordinated weed control program for their lawns. Describes types of weeds, proper lawn management, weed biology and control, weed control prior to turf establishment and in established turf, and pesticide application procedures. Published by the UF Department of Environmental Horticulture, April 2008.