Rootstock Selection

Citrus research in a greenhouse at Citrus REC in Lake Alfred.

The large number of different rootstock varieties currently available for citrus production in Florida is unprecedented. This new 4-page article, chapter 4 of the forthcoming UF/IFAS Citrus Nursery Production Guide, provides information on rootstock uses in Florida, rootstock propagation, and the impact of tissue culture, as well as factors to consider when deciding which rootstock to plant. Written by Ute Albrecht, Manjul Dutt, and Jude Grosser and published by the UF/IFAS Horticultural Sciences Department.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1340

Citrus Rootstock Propagation: Traditional Techniques and Recent Advances

Freshly cut single internodes placed in potting mix with leaf blade attached but reduced in size

Commercially grown citrus trees are usually composed of two parts: 1) the scion, which is the aboveground portion of the tree that produces the fruit, and 2) the rootstock, which comprises the root system and the lower portion of the trunk. This new 4-page publication, chapter 6 of the forthcoming Citrus Nursery Production Guide, discusses three kinds of rootstock propagation: seed, cuttings, and tissue culture. Written by Ute Albrecht, Lorenzo Rossi, and Mongi Zekri and published by the UF/IFAS Horticultural Sciences Department.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1329

Plant Biostimulants: Definition and Overview of Categories and Effects

Fucus distichus

This new 4-page article provides an overview of a group of crop production materials termed “plant biostimulants,” which are frequently promoted as environment-friendly alternatives to chemical-based products. It explains their regulatory status and presents an overview of the most popular materials (e.g., beneficial fungi, seaweeds, and silicon) and their effects on plants. Written by Ute Albrecht and published by the UF/IFAS Horticultural Sciences Department.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1330

Citrus Propagation

Plant propagation is the art and science of reproducing plants while preserving their unique characteristics from one generation to the next. This 6-page document, written by Ute Albrecht, Mongi Zekri, and Jeffrey Williamson, describes the propagation process for commercial citrus. Published by the UF/IFAS Horticultural Sciences Department, October 2017.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1309

Citrus Production Guide: Rootstock and Scion Selection

Oranges on trees in a grove at the Citrus Research and Education Center. Photo taken on 03/04/16.When preparing for replanting, an important factor to consider is the choice of rootstock. Choosing the right rootstock and scion combination can result in higher economic returns without any additional cost. Rootstocks affect scion vigor, yield, fruit size, juice quality, and pest tolerance. However, tree growth, yield, and fruit quality interact strongly with climate, soil type, tree spacing, and other factors, often producing contradictory reports on rootstock performance in different areas. This 3-page fact sheet discusses soil characteristics, rootstock effects on pests and diseases, tree spacing and size, and rootstock/scion combination. Written by Ute Albrecht, Fernando Alferez, and Mongi Zekri, and published by the UF/IFAS Department of Horticultural Sciences, September 2017.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1308

Grove Planning and Establishment

Orange grove.

Many factors need to be considered when preparing for new tree plantings. Careful planning and preparation is necessary to ensure success and reduce future frustrations. This three-page document describes the factors that contribute to the success of new grove establishment. Written by Mongi Zekri, Ute Albrecht, Christopher Vincent, and Tripti Vashisth and published by UF’s Horticultural Sciences Department, September 2017.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1302