School Gardens: A Growing Part of Schools

Students at the Loxahatchee Groves Elementary School in Palm Beach County are learning how to grow their own vegetables in the new SOAR (Sharing Our Agricultural Roots) project started by the University of Florida's Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences in cooperation with public schools and volunteers from the county farm community. UF plant pathologist Richard Raid, working with the young gardeners on Monday, June 2, said the SOAR project teaches children about composting, recycling and other ways to protect the environment.
School gardens have been popping up like little pea plants in schools all over Florida. Not only are they an excellent way to get fresh produce into classrooms and cafeterias, but they also provide students with a living classroom where concepts related to science, math, agriculture, and nutrition can be learned and applied. This 4-page fact sheet discusses the benefits of school gardens to children and teachers, different types of school gardens, and points to consider while planning. Written by Kohrine Counts and Karla P. Shelnutt, and published by the UF Department of Family, Youth and Community Sciences, February 2016.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fy1463

Construccion de Sistema Hidroponico Flotante (HS1210)

Figure 1.  Lechuga en sistema hidrop√≥nico flotante.Los aztecas maravillaron a los conquistadores españoles con sus huertos flotantes, y hoy, 500 años después, usted puede impresionar a sus amigos y vecinos con el suyo. This 4-page fact sheet was written by Horticultural Sciences, and published by the UF Department of J. Bosques, M. Sweat, R. Tyson, y R. Hochmuth, January 2013.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1210