Worker Protection Standard: Certified Crop Advisor Exemption

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In 1992, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued a comprehensive regulation called the Worker Protection Standard for Agricultural Pesticides (WPS). The EPA has made several changes to the WPS since it was fully implemented in 1995. On November 2, 2015, the EPA made significant changes to the rule’s requirements. Most of the revised provisions will become effective January 2, 2017 and there are four provisions that are delayed until January 2, 2018. This five-page fact sheet answers questions regarding changes made to the exemptions for Certified Crop Advisors. Written by Frederick M. Fishel and Tatiana Sanchez and published by the Agronomy Department.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/pi265

Worker Protection Standard: Notification and Hazard Communication

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In 1992, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued a comprehensive regulation called the Worker Protection Standard for Agricultural Pesticides (WPS). The EPA has made several changes to the WPS since it was fully implemented in 1995. On November 2, 2015, the EPA made significant changes to the rule’s requirements. Most of the revised provisions will become effective January 2, 2017 and there are four provisions that are delayed until January 2, 2018. This five-page fact sheet answers questions regarding changes made to the rules about notification and hazard communication. Written by Frederick M. Fishel and Tatiana Sanchez, and published by the Agronomy Department.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/pi266

Worker Protection Standard: Information at a Central Location

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This three-page FAQ fact sheet answers questions about posting information at a central location per the regulations of the Worker Protection Standard (WPS).
Written by Frederick M. Fishel and Tatiana Sanchez and published by the Agronomy Department.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/pi149

Worker Protection Standard: Training Workers and Handlers under the 2016 Revision Requirements

Herman Brown, a University of Florida agricultural assistant, sprays pesticide on transgenic rice plants in a greenhouse in Gainesville -- Friday, Oct. 10, 2003. Researchers at UF's Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences are adding a gene to the plants to protect them from bacterial blight, which is a major disease for rice farmers in Africa and Southeast Asia.

In 1992, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued a comprehensive regulation called the Worker Protection Standard for Agricultural Pesticides (WPS). The EPA has made several changes to the WPS since it was fully implemented in 1995. On November 2, 2015, the EPA revised the WPS, making significant changes to the rule’s requirements. Most of the revised provisions will become effective January 2, 2017; there are four provisions that are delayed until January 2, 2018. This five-page fact sheet answers questions regarding changes made to the rules about how to train Workers and Handlers. Written by Frederick M. Fishel and published by the Agronomy Department.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/pi268

Worker Protection Standard: Owner and Immediate Family Exemption

Pesticide testing.
This three-page FAQ fact sheet answers questions about the exemptions for owners and their immediate families in the Worker Protection Standard (WPS).
Written by Frederick M. Fishel and Tatiana Sanchez and published by the Agronomy Department.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/pi264

Worker Protection Standard: Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) 2016

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In 1992, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued a comprehensive regulation called the Worker Protection Standard for Agricultural Pesticides (WPS). The EPA has made several changes to the WPS since it was fully implemented in 1995. On November 2, 2015, the EPA made significant changes to the rule’s requirements. Most of the revised provisions will become effective January 2, 2017 and there are four provisions that are delayed until January 2, 2018. This five-page fact sheet answers questions regarding changes made to the rules about Personal Protective Equipment (PPE). Written by Frederick M. Fishel and published by the Agronomy Department.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/pi267

Worker Protection Standard: Application Exclusion Zone (AEZ)

Pesticide testing.
The Worker Protection Standard (WPS) is a Federal regulation designed to protect agricultural workers (people involved in the production of agricultural plants) and pesticide handlers (people mixing, loading, or applying pesticides or doing other tasks involving direct contact with pesticides).The “Application Exclusion Zone” or AEZ is a new term used in the WPS rule; it refers to the area surrounding the pesticide application equipment. This three-page fact sheet explains this new rule. Written by Fred M. Fishel and Tatiana Sanchez and published by the Agronomy Department.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/pi263

Pest Strips: You Have to Read the Fine Print

Figure 1. Typical pest strip sold at retail outlets. Credits: UF/IFAS Pesticide Information Office.
Pest strips are commonly sold at many retail outlets and are available to anyone for purchase. They are constructed of resin plastic with an insecticide that is gradually control-released over time as a vapor. This two-page fact sheets gives important tips on how to use pest strips correctly without creating a hazard.Written by Fred Fishel and published by the Agronomy Department.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/pi262

Pesticide Emergencies: Fires and Spills

Figure 2. A large spill into a canal is especially serious.
Although accidents and emergencies involving pesticides are rare, unfortunately they do occur. Pesticide fires or spills can result in water, soil, and air contamination; damage to plants; injury to livestock, wildlife, or pets; and can endanger the health of the applicator and other people. Those using pesticides mus be prepared to respond to fires and spills as emergencies and act promptly and correctly. This six-page fact sheet explains how to reduce fire and spill hazards and what to do if a fire or spill should occur. Written by Frederick M. Fishel, and published by the Agronomy Department.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/pi258

Pesticides: Routes of Exposure

Pesticide testing.
Pesticides can cause both short-term and long-term effects in humans. Human exposure to pesticides can happen through four major routes: through the mouth and digestive system, through the eyes, through the skin, or through the nose and respiratory system. This two-page fact sheet explains each route of pesticide exposure, providing information on how to reduce the risk of pesticide exposure and hazard. Written by Frederick M. Fishel, and published by the Agronomy Department.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/pi260

Pesticide Labeling: Precautionary Statements

Pesticide testing.
Precautionary statements found on pesticide labeling tell the user information about the toxicity, irritation, and sensitization hazards associated with the use of the pesticide. These labels also provide treatment instructions and information to reduce exposure potential. This five-page fact sheet describes the different types of statements found on pesticide labels, as well as the instructions for personal protective equipment, and first-aid treatments. This publication also contains several reference tables for pesticide labels and their meanings. Written by Frederick M. Fishel, and published by the Agronomy Department.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/pi259

Pesticide Emergencies: Contingency Planning

Figure 1. Example of a facility map.
In the event of a pesticide emergency, having a an emergency response plan can help protect the health and welfare of employees and the community, minimize environmental damage, and potentially reduce liability. The goal of contingency planning is to prevent emergencies; but if an emergency does occur, the contingency plan allows business owners and managers to react appropriately in order to minimize detrimental effects.This eleven-page fact sheet provides insight on how to develop a contingency plan for addressing emergencies where pesticides are involved. Written by Frederick M. Fishel, and published by the Agronomy Department.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/pi257

A Summary of Revisions to the Worker Protection Standard: 2015

Figure 5. Respirator use must conform to OSHA standards in the revised WPS.
In 1992, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued a comprehensive regulation called the Worker Protection Standard for Agricultural Pesticides (WPS). The WPS covers pesticides used in the outdoor and enclosed space production of plants on farms, forests, and nurseries, as well as greenhouses. The EPA has made several changes to the WPS since it was fully implemented in 1995. On November 2, 2015, the EPA revised the WPS, making significant changes to the rule’s requirements. This five-page fact sheet explains those changes. Written by Frederick M. Fishel, and published by the Agronomy Department.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/pi261

First Aid for Pesticide Exposure

Pesticide testing.
Pesticide poisoning is a commonly under-diagnosed illness. This five-page fact sheet describes how to recognize the early symptoms of pesticide exposure and provide basic first aid for the treatment of victims. This fact sheet explains how to provide initial treatment in the case of pesticide exposure on the skin, in the eye, through inhalation, and in the mouth or swallowed. Written by Frederick M. Fishel, and published by the Agronomy Department.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/pi256

Pesticide Storage: Keep It in the Container

Figure 1. Pesticides should never be stored in beverage or foodstuff containers Credit: Fred Fishel, UF/IFASAccidents happen quickly, and so do accidents with pesticides. Anyone storing pesticides, especially in the presence of children, needs to take precautions by keeping them in their proper, original containers. Several people have died when they unknowingly drank pesticides from containers that originally held soda, other beverages, or foodstuffs. In particular, the herbicide paraquat is highly toxic to humans; one small accidental sip can be fatal, and there is no antidote. This 3-page fact sheet was written by Fred Fishel, and published by the UF Department of Agronomy, May 2015. (Photo: Fred Fishel)
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/pi255

Pool Chemicals and Personal Safety

Figure 1. Pool chemicals, distributed through box stores, are classified as pesticides.Pool chemicals are among the most common household substances and are used to protect health in recreational waters. Pool chemicals containing chlorine safeguard against recreational-water illnesses caused by disease-causing pathogens, such as the diarrhea-causing Cryptosporidium. They also enhance disinfection by regulating water pH. But even though these materials are regularly handled by homeowners, most don’t ever realize that they are handling pesticides. This 3-page fact sheet was written by Fred Fishel, and published by the UF Department of Agronomy, September 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/pi253

Clasificacion de las licencias para aplicadores dictadas por el Departamento de Agricultura y Servicios al Consumidor del estado de la Florida (FDACS), relacionadas con agricultura y control de plagas

man spraying rice in greenhouseEsta guía ofrece una explicación de las licencias para aplicadores de pesticidas privados, públicos y comerciales emitidos por FDACS en el Capítulo 487 de los Estatutos de la Florida. This 4-page fact sheet is the Spanish language version of Agricultural and Related Pest Control Applicator License Classifications under the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (FDACS). Written by Frederick M. Fishel and Tatiana Sanchez, and published by the UF Department of Agronomy, February 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/pi249

Mejorando la efectividad de un programa profesional para el manejo de plagas

shady lawnEl propósito de esta guía es proporcionar información que permita optimizar el control de plagas en el entorno del hogar cuando se trabaja con un operador profesional para el control de plagas. This 2-page fact sheet is a Spanish language translation of Enhancing the Effectiveness of a Professional Pest Management Program, written by Frederick M. Fishel and Tatiana Sanchez, and published by the UF Department of Agronomy, March 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/pi252

Guia de gestion de plagas para citricos en la Florida 2014: Interpretacion de los enunciados de PPE en las etiquetas de pesticidas

Citrus groves, leaves, oranges, trees. UF/IFAS Photo: Thomas Wright.Este documento le ayuda a comprender los enunciados revisados para Equipo de Protección Personal (PPE) que ahora hacen parte de las etiquetas de los productos pesticidas utilizados en las fincas, bosques, viveros e invernaderos. This 3-page fact sheet is a Spanish-language translation of 2014 Florida Citrus Pest Management Guide: Interpreting PPE Statements on Pesticide Labels. Written by O. Norman Nesheim, Frederick M. Fishel, and Tatiana Sanchez, and published by the UF Department of Agronomy, September 2013.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/cg089

Minimizing Honey Bee Exposure to Pesticides

Figure 1. The western honey bee, Apis mellifera, collecting nectar from a flower.Protecting honey bees and other pollinators from pesticide impacts is important to the sustainability of agriculture. Consequently, pesticide applicators must determine if there is a clear hazard to managed or wild populations of bees. Potential exposure of bees to pesticides can vary greatly depending on the type of pesticide, formulation, application method, label restrictions, and other factors. The goal in using a pesticide is to achieve maximum benefit (success) with minimum negative impact, and these factors should always be considered in pesticide selection. This publication is written (1) to help assure the sustainability of both bees and agriculture by informing beekeepers, pesticide users, and the general public about the often complex relationship between pollinators (specifically bees) and pesticides, (2) to offer guidance for improved communication between beekeepers and pesticide users, (3) to offer pollinator risk-reducing strategies for growers and other applicators when using pesticides, and (4) to provide clarity in laws, labeling, and associated definitions. This 14-page fact sheet was written by J. D. Ellis, J. Klopchin, E. Buss, F. M. Fishel, W. H. Kern, C. Mannion, E. McAvoy, L. S. Osborne, M. Rogers, M. Sanford, H. Smith, P. Stansly, L. Stelinski, and S. Webb, and published by the UF Department of Entomology and Nematology, March 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/in1027