Weed Control for Ornamentals inside Greenhouses and Other Enclosed Structures

Figure 2. Close-up of mulberry weed (Fatoua villosa), which can harbor whiteflies and other insects.
Maintaining a weed-free greenhouse is important for producing healthy and marketable crops. Weeds will compete with crops for water, light, and nutrients. Weeds can find favorable conditions for growth in gravel and along edges, tears, and worn areas of ground cloth. It is important to frequently scout for weeds. This five-page fact sheet describes both chemical methods of controlling weeds, but also non-chemical methods, such as sanitation and prevention, hand weeding, and cultural control practices. Written by Chris Marble and Jeremy Pickens, and published by the Environmental Horticulture Department.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep528

Improving Weed Control in Landscape Planting Beds

Coarse pine bark nuggets and other mulch materials can help to suppress weed germination and growth in landscape planting beds.

Because landscape beds often contain a variety of ornamental plants, shrubs, and trees, using herbicides to control weeds in these areas can be challenging; however, non-herbicidal methods can be labor intensive. This 6-page fact sheet outlines how to use landscape design and cultural and chemical practices to effectively control weeds in landscape beds. This publication also discusses the use of pre- and postemergent herbicides. Written by Chris Marble and Andrew Koeser, and published by the UF Department of Environmental Horticulture, June 2015.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep523

Biology and Management of Graceful Sandmat (Chamaesyce hypericifolia) in Ornamental Crop Production

Graceful sandmat inflorescence.

Graceful sandmat (Chamaesyce hypericifolia) is a problematic weed that often grows in container media in ornamental plant nurseries. This 4-page facts sheet profiles the biology of graceful sandmat and recommends physical, cultural, and chemicals methods for managing the weed in the nursery environment. Written by Theresa Chormanski, Chris Marble, and Lyn Gettys, and published by the UF Department of Environmental Horticulture, June 2015.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep522

Biology and Management of Long-Stalked Phyllanthus in Ornamental Crop Production

Figure 3. Long-stalked phyllanthus in flower.

This 5-page fact sheet discusses the characteristics of long-stalked phyllanthus and explains how to control its growth in a nursery environment. Written by Theresa Chormanski, Chris Marble, and Lyn Gettys, and published by the UF Department of Environmental Horticulture, April 2015.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep518

Biology and Management of Mulberry Weed (Fatoua villosa) in Ornamental Crop Production

Figure 2. Mulberry weed seedlings.

This 4-page fact sheet discusses the characteristics of mulberry weed (Fatoua villosa) and explains how to control its growth in a nursery environment. Written by Chris Marble and Shawn Steed, and published by the UF Department of Environmental Horticulture, April 2015.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep517

Biology and Management of Oxalis (Oxalis stricta) in Ornamental Crop Production

Figure 1. Oxalis growing in loropetalum liner. Oxalis grows throughout the year in Florida. It can be found growing in sidewalk cracks, alongside trails, in lawns, flower beds, cultivated fields, and in container nursery stock. In greenhouse studies, oxalis populations have been shown to negatively impact the growth rates of ornamental crops. This 6-page fact sheet was written by Matt Lollar and Chris Marble, and published by the UF Department of Environmental Horticulture, February 2015. (Photo: Chris Marble)

http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep514

Biology and Management of Eclipta (Eclipta prostrata) in Ornamental Crop Production

Figure 2. Eclipta growth in a mulched landscape bed. Note the purplish stems, lanceolate leaves, and prostrate growth habit.Eclipta grows aggressively in containers and can outcompete nursery crops for water, nutrients, and light. Plants flower in as little as five weeks after germination and produce thousands of seeds over the course of a growing season, and stem fragments left on the soil or media surface following hand-weeding or cultivation can root and reproduce vegetatively. This 4-page fact sheet describes the plant, its biology, and recommendations for physical, cultural, and chemical control. Written by Chris Marble, Shawn Steed, and Nathan S. Boyd, and published by the UF Department of Environmental Horticulture, January 2015. (Photo: Annette Chandler, UF/IFAS)
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep512

Biology and Management of Hairy Bittercress (Cardamine hirsute) in Ornamental Crop Production

Figure 1. Bittercress with clumping growth habit in loropetalum cuttings. Credit: Chris Marble Bittercress commonly grows in the potting media of container-grown ornamentals and often through drainage holes in nursery containers. It also can be a problem in propagation houses, greenhouses, and in the field. This 6-page fact sheet provides species description, plant biology, and management recommendations. Written by Chris Marble, Shawn Steed, and Nathan S. Boyd, and published by the UF Department of Environmental Horticulture, December 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep511

Postemergent Herbicides for Use In Ornamentals

nursery with potted flowers, benches. UF/IFAS Photo: Thomas Wright.Postemergent herbicides are applied directly to weeds. This 5-page fact sheet is largely comprised of two tables: Table one lists postemergent herbicides that can be safely used over the top of some ornamentals when used according to label directions; table 2 lists postemergent herbicides that are registered for use around ornamental plants when applied as a directed spray. Written by Jeffrey G. Norcini and Chris Marble, and published by the UF Department of Environmental Horticulture, November 2014. (UF/IFAS photo: Thomas Wright)
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/wg059