Frost Damage of Carinata Grown in the Southeastern US

More severe cold damage of carinata during early bolting. This level of damage is expected to reduce stands and yield. Note that aboveground tissue was severely affected, but neither the growing points nor roots died. This field generally grew back from the growing point, but could have resprouted at the crown if the damage was more severe. UF/IFAS West Florida Research and Education Center, Jay, FL.

Brassica carinata is an annual oilseed crop used for the commercial production of jet fuel. One of the challenges to commercialization of this crop in the southeastern United States has been frost damage. This 4-page fact sheet discusses symptomology and ways to minimize risk of frost damage to carinata. Written by Michael J. Mulvaney, Ramdeo Seepaul, Ian Small, David Wright, Silvana Paula-Moraes, Carl Crozier, Paul Cockson, Brian Whipker, and Ramon Leon, and published by the UF/IFAS Agronomy Department, May 2018.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ag420

Using Dicamba in Dicamba-Tolerant Crops

Chipley, Florida, farm, harvest, October, Washington County, cotton, combine. UF/IFAS Photo: Josh Wickham.

After many years in development, dicamba will likely be fully approved for use in tolerant cotton varieties for the 2017 growing season. There is great concern that dicamba drift can result in significant losses in nearby sensitive crops. This concern is well-founded because many crops (such as soybean, snap bean, and peanut) are highly sensitive to extremely low doses of dicamba. All precautions must be followed if these new dicamba formulations are to be used. This 3-page fact sheet discusses herbicide selection, discontinued use of ammonium sulfate, nozzle selection, boom height, and wind speed. It also addresses a few frequently asked questions. Written by J. Ferrell and R. Leon, and published by the UF Agronomy Department, February 2017.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ag414