Biology and Management of Dodder (Cuscuta spp.) in Ornamental Crop Production and Landscape

Dodder are a group of over 150 species in the genus Cuscuta. This 4-page publication was developed to help commercial growers, landscape professionals, and homeowners identify and manage dodder infestations in their greenhouses, nurseries, or landscapes. Written by Kaley Mierek, Chris Marble, Nathan Boyd, and Shawn Steed and published by the UF/IFAS Environmental Horticulture Department, May 2018.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep556

Biology and Management of Goosegrass (Eleusine indica (L.) Gaertn.) in Ornamental Plant Production

Figure 4. Seed head Credits: Nathan S. Boyd, UF/IFAS

This six-page fact sheet provides information about the biology and management of goosegrass, including preemergence and postemergence control options. Written by Shawn Steed, Christopher Marble, Nathan S. Boyd, Andrew MacRae, and Kiran Fnu and published by the Environmental Horticulture Department.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep538

Biology and Management of Thickhead (Crassocephalum crepidioides) in Ornamental Crop Production

Figure 2. Thickhead cotyledon and first true leaf. Credits: Annette Chandler, UF/IFAS Mid-Florida Research and Education Center

Typically found in shadehouses and shaded areas of nursery production, thickhead grows aggressively in containers and can outcompete nursery crops for water, nutrients, and light. This erect, sparingly branched, herbaceous annual, grows up to 4 feet tall and germinates over a wide range of pH, salt, and temperature conditions. This four-page fact sheet describes thickhead (Crassocephalum crepidioides) and various methods for its control in ornamental crop production. Written by Allison Bechtloff, Shawn Steed, Chris Marble, and Nathan Boyd and published by the Environmental Horticulture Department.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep534

Herbicidas Postemergentes para Uso en Ornamentales

Rose specimens infected with rose rosette virus. Photo taken on 10-3-15  Photo Credits:  UF/IFAS Photo by Tyler Jones
This is the Spanish language version of ENH95/WG095 Postemergent Herbicides for Use in Ornamentals http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/wg059 Postemergent herbicides are applied directly to weeds. This 5-page fact sheet is largely comprised of two tables: Table one lists postemergent herbicides that can be safely used over the top of some ornamentals when used according to label directions; table 2 lists postemergent herbicides that are registered for use around ornamental plants when applied as a directed spray. Written by E. Vanesssa Campoverde, Chris Marble, and Jeffrey G. Norcini and published by the Environmental Horticulture Department.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep533

Biology and Management of Ragweed Parthenium (Parthenium hysterophorous L.) in Ornamental Crop Production

Figure 1. Ragweed parthenium growing in a pot. Note the upright growth habit and the basal rosette leaves. Credits: Annette Chandler, UF/IFAS

This six-page fact sheet provides an overview of Ragweed Parthenium, Parthenium hysterophorous L, including a species description and information on how to manage ragweed parthenium culturally, physically, and chemically. Written by Debalina Saha, Chris Marble, Robert H. Stamps, and Shawn Steed and published by the Environmental Horticulture Department.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep531

Weed Control for Ornamentals inside Greenhouses and Other Enclosed Structures

Figure 2. Close-up of mulberry weed (Fatoua villosa), which can harbor whiteflies and other insects.
Maintaining a weed-free greenhouse is important for producing healthy and marketable crops. Weeds will compete with crops for water, light, and nutrients. Weeds can find favorable conditions for growth in gravel and along edges, tears, and worn areas of ground cloth. It is important to frequently scout for weeds. This five-page fact sheet describes both chemical methods of controlling weeds, but also non-chemical methods, such as sanitation and prevention, hand weeding, and cultural control practices. Written by Chris Marble and Jeremy Pickens, and published by the Environmental Horticulture Department.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep528

Biology and Management of Graceful Sandmat (Chamaesyce hypericifolia) in Ornamental Crop Production

Graceful sandmat inflorescence.

Graceful sandmat (Chamaesyce hypericifolia) is a problematic weed that often grows in container media in ornamental plant nurseries. This 4-page facts sheet profiles the biology of graceful sandmat and recommends physical, cultural, and chemicals methods for managing the weed in the nursery environment. Written by Theresa Chormanski, Chris Marble, and Lyn Gettys, and published by the UF Department of Environmental Horticulture, June 2015.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep522

Biology and Management of Long-Stalked Phyllanthus in Ornamental Crop Production

Figure 3. Long-stalked phyllanthus in flower.

This 5-page fact sheet discusses the characteristics of long-stalked phyllanthus and explains how to control its growth in a nursery environment. Written by Theresa Chormanski, Chris Marble, and Lyn Gettys, and published by the UF Department of Environmental Horticulture, April 2015.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep518

Biology and Management of Mulberry Weed (Fatoua villosa) in Ornamental Crop Production

Figure 2. Mulberry weed seedlings.

This 4-page fact sheet discusses the characteristics of mulberry weed (Fatoua villosa) and explains how to control its growth in a nursery environment. Written by Chris Marble and Shawn Steed, and published by the UF Department of Environmental Horticulture, April 2015.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep517

Biology and Management of Oxalis (Oxalis stricta) in Ornamental Crop Production

Figure 1. Oxalis growing in loropetalum liner. Oxalis grows throughout the year in Florida. It can be found growing in sidewalk cracks, alongside trails, in lawns, flower beds, cultivated fields, and in container nursery stock. In greenhouse studies, oxalis populations have been shown to negatively impact the growth rates of ornamental crops. This 6-page fact sheet was written by Matt Lollar and Chris Marble, and published by the UF Department of Environmental Horticulture, February 2015. (Photo: Chris Marble)

http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep514

Biology and Management of Hairy Bittercress (Cardamine hirsute) in Ornamental Crop Production

Figure 1. Bittercress with clumping growth habit in loropetalum cuttings. Credit: Chris Marble Bittercress commonly grows in the potting media of container-grown ornamentals and often through drainage holes in nursery containers. It also can be a problem in propagation houses, greenhouses, and in the field. This 6-page fact sheet provides species description, plant biology, and management recommendations. Written by Chris Marble, Shawn Steed, and Nathan S. Boyd, and published by the UF Department of Environmental Horticulture, December 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep511

Postemergent Herbicides for Use In Ornamentals

nursery with potted flowers, benches. UF/IFAS Photo: Thomas Wright.Postemergent herbicides are applied directly to weeds. This 5-page fact sheet is largely comprised of two tables: Table one lists postemergent herbicides that can be safely used over the top of some ornamentals when used according to label directions; table 2 lists postemergent herbicides that are registered for use around ornamental plants when applied as a directed spray. Written by Jeffrey G. Norcini and Chris Marble, and published by the UF Department of Environmental Horticulture, November 2014. (UF/IFAS photo: Thomas Wright)
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/wg059

Uso Apropiado y Manipulacion de Glifosato en Viveros de Plantas (ENH1209/EP470)

Figure 3. Coberturas pueden ayudar a reducir la deriva de la aplicaciĆ³n hacia plantas deseables.El glifosato es el químico de protección para cultivos más vendido en el mundo y el herbicida mós usado en la industria de viveros de plantas en los Estados Unidos. El glifosato es usado para el control post emergente de malezas. Esta publicación describe el uso adecuado de glifosato para los productores de plantas y sus empleados. This 4-page fact sheet was written by Shawn T. Steed, Robert H. Stamps, and Rodrigo Diaz, and published by the UF Department of Environmental Horticulture, February 2013.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep470

Alternatives to Synthetic Herbicides for Weed Management in Container Nurseries (ENH1203/EP464)

Figure 2. Gaps between the disk edge and container rim, along the installation slit, and around the plant stem allow weeds to grow. Weed management is one of the most critical and costly aspects of container nursery production. This is most effectively achieved through preventative practices, primarily with preemergent herbicides. But there are valid reasons for managing weeds with alternatives to synthetic herbicides, including sanitation, exclusion, prevention, hand weeding, mulching, and the use of cover crops, heat, and nonsynthetic herbicides. This 6-page fact sheet was written by Gary W. Knox, Matthew Chappell, and Robert H. Stamps, and published by the UF Department of Environmental Horticulture, September 2012.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep464

Proper Use and Handling of Glyphosate in Plant Nurseries (ENH1198/EP459)

Figure 2.  Too much glyphosate spray has been applied to this plant, and the runoff represents wasted money and time and could negatively affect non-target plants and animals.Glyphosate is the most used herbicide in the nursery industry in the United States. Used for postemergent control of vegetation, it controls annual and perennial grasses, broadleaves, and sedges. But it is easy to cause unintended damage to desirable vegetation if this product is used incorrectly. This 4-page fact sheet outlines the proper use of glyphosate for plant producers and their employees. Written by Shawn T. Steed and Robert H. Stamps and published by the UF Department of Environmental Horticulture, May 2012.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep459

Preemergence Herbicides for Use in Ornamentals (OH94/WG058)

Roses, flowers, ornamental horticulture, gardening. Photo by Eric ZamoraPreemergence herbicides are herbicides that are applied prior to weed seed germination. Control of weeds using preemergence herbicides is most successful when the correct herbicide is applied in the correct manner to a weed-free growing medium prior to weed seed germination. This 60-page fact sheet was written by Robert H. Stamps, Heidi M. Savage, Diane K. Rock, and Jeffrey G. Norcini, and published by the UF Department of Environmental Horticulture, March 2012.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/wg058

Prevention, Early Detection, and Eradication of Benghal Dayflower in Field Nurseries (ENH1085/EP350)

Benghal dayflower is an increasingly problematic weed that is federally designated as a noxious weed. This 10-page fact sheet provides nursery owners how to prevent, detect, and eradicate this invasive plant. Written by Robert Stamps, and published by the UF Department of Environmental Horticulture, May 2011.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep350

ENH1085/EP350 Some Suggestions for Controlling Benghal Dayflower in Field Nurseries

ENH-1085, a 9-page illustrated fact-sheet by Robert Stamps, describes this increasingly problematic weed — also known as jio, tropical spiderwort, hairy wandering jew, and Indian dayflower — in field nurseries, its identification, control, factors effecting pre- and post-emergence herbicides, tables of recommended herbicides, and references. Published by UF Department of Environmental Horticulture, January 2008.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/EP350