Using Perceived Landscape Benefits to Subgroup Extension Clients to Promote Urban Landscape Water Conservation

A watering tin and gardening gloves at a home garden.

Because a large percentage of water used in urban areas can be applied through irrigation, home landscape management practices are an important factor of water conservation. The information in this 5-page document is the result of a cluster analysis used to identify meaningful subgroups among home irrigation users to encourage water conservation behaviors. Written by Amanda D. Ali, Laura A. Sanagorski Warner, and Anil Kumar Chaudhary and published by the UF/IFAS Department of Agricultural Education and Communication, May 2018.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/wc291

How Do Floridians Perceive Their Role in Protecting Water Quality and Quantity Through Landscape Practices?

suburban landscape

Florida is faced with challenges in protecting both water quality and quantity; the state’s incredible number of home landscapes can positively or negatively impact water depending on how landscapes are managed. In 2016, Florida residents with irrigated landscapes were surveyed in order to create more effective Extension programs regarding landscape best management practices. This 4-page document discusses the results of this survey. Written by Laura A. Sanagorski Warner, Alexa J. Lamm, and Anil Kumar Chaudhary and published by the UF/IFAS Department of Agricultural Education and Communication, January 2018.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/wc293

Understanding Good Irrigation and Fertilization Behaviors Among Households Using Landscape Design Features

With increasing concerns over water resources in Florida, Extension can target households with irrigated landscapes to encourage practices that protect water quality and quantity. This document compares the water conservation education needs of different Florida household subgroups. Written by Anil Kumar Chaudhary and Laura A. Warner and published by the UF/IFAS Department of Agricultural Education and Communication, January 2018.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/wc292

Residents' Perceived Landscape Benefits Can Help Extension Promote Good Landscape Management Practices


Households can help conserve and protect water resources through irrigation and fertilizer best practices without compromising the quality of their landscape. UF/IFAS Extension, along with Extension services across the country, conducts programs to protect water quality and quantity by educating communities and individuals about research-based landscape practices. This four-page fact sheet describes the results of a survey that can help Extension promote good landscape management practices. Written by Laura A. Warner, Amanda D. Ali, and Anil Kumar Chaudhary and published by the Department of Agricultural Education and Communication.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/wc282

Water Conservation and Extension Participants: An Interesting Synergy

Sprinklers watering athletic fields.

The home landscape is a place where there is a great opportunity for people to adopt irrigation practices and technologies that conserve water. However, a large portion of residents lack the required knowledge and skills to adopt some of those practices. This three-page fact sheet discusses using innovative evaluation approaches to demonstrate the impacts of statewide urban water conservation programs. Written by Laura A. Warner, Sebastian Galindo-Gonzalez, and Anil Kumar Chaudhary and published by the Department of Agricultural Education and Communication.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/wc278

Estimating Benefits of Residential Outdoor Water Conservation: A Step-by-Step Guide

This 9-page fact sheet written by Tatiana Borisova, Laura A. Warner, Jennison Searcy, Anil Kumar Chaudhary, and Michael Dukes and published by the UF Department of Food and Resource Economics in February 2017 was developed to help Extension agents, water-conservation managers, and homeowners estimate the economic benefits of residential outdoor water conservation. It provides guidance for reporting benefits, including lowered utility bills for homeowners, reduced water-delivery costs for utilities, and increased water supply. This publication also offers an example of an impact statement.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fe1009

Identifying Gaps between Importance and Satisfaction to Identify Extension Clients' Needs

Figure 1. Importance-Performance Matrix. Credits: Martilla & James, 1977, p.78

The third document in a series of three about using Importance-performance analyiss to prioritize Extension resources, this three-page article covers gap analysis as a means to understand a client's perceptions and rank Extension priorities. Gap analysis using IPA is an innovative and useful approach for Extension educators to conduct needs assessments and to evaluate programs. Written by Anil Kumar Chaudhary and Laura A. Warner and published by the Department of Agricultural Education and Communication.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/wc252

Visually Plotting Importance and Satisfaction to Identify Extension Clients' Needs

Figure 1. Importance-Performance Matrix. Credits: Martilla & James, 1977, p.78

The second document in a series of three about using importance-performance analysis to prioritize Extension resources, this four-page article covers how to collect data and use them to generate visual plots. IPA data plots are attractive and easy-to-understand visual maps that display importance and satisfaction scores for certain attributes. Written by Anil Kumar Chaudhary and Laura A. Warner and published by the Department of Agricultural Education and Communication.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/wc251

Prioritizing Extension Resources Using Perceived Importance and Satisfaction: An Underutilized Approach

Figure 1. Importance-Performance Matrix. Credits: Martilla & James, 1977, p.78

This is the first article in a series of three on using Importance-performance analysis to prioritize Extension resources. Importance-performance analysis, or IPA, measure how people feel about certain chracteristics of a place, issue, or program. Extension professionals can use IPA to make decisions and prioritize resources by understanding how clients rate the importance of and satisfaction with specific attributes of a program or facility. This three-page fact sheet explains IPA and how to use it. Written by Laura A. Warner and Anil Jumar Chaudhary and published by the Department of Agricultural Education and Communication.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/wc250

The Savvy Survey #6d: Constructing Indices for a Questionnaire

Theresa Ferrari, left, extension youth development specialist in the Department of Family, Youth and Community Sciences, and Steve Jacob review findings form the citizen survey.
One of The Savvy Survey Series, this article will help Extension agents understand indexes and how to use them when evaluating an educational program. This six-page fact sheet provides an overview of constructing indices for a questionnaire. Specifically, it will discuss why composite measures like index numbers are important, what the index number means, the difference between indexes and scales, steps for the construction of indexes, and recommendations for use by Extension educators. Written by Anil Kumar Chaudhary and Glenn D. Israel, and published by the Agricultural Education and Communication Department.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/pd069

Encouraging Landscape Water Conservation Behaviors Series Overview #7: Personal and Social Norms of Florida Residents Who Use Irrigation in the Home Landscape

people talking about landscaping choices in Florida-friendly development
This 4-page fact sheet is the seventh publication in a series focusing on encouraging water conservation among Florida residents who use irrigation in their home landscapes. Extension educators create programs to encourage good irrigation practices and water conservation activities based on personal and social normative beliefs. To help in this goal, the authors examine personal and social norms of Florida residents who use irrigation in the home landscape and describe how Extension educators can capitalize on these positive norms to motivate Floridians to learn and use best water conservation practices. Written by Anil Kumar Chaudhary, Laura A. Warner, Alexa Lamm, Joy N. Rumble, and Randal Cantrell and published by the Agricultural Education and Communication Department.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/wc205

Introduction to Social Network Research: General Introduction and Major Terminology

Figure 1. Whole network map of scientific collaboration at University of Florida in 2012. Adapted from McCarty and Vacca (2013).Social networks play an important role in the functioning of society and have an important effect on the actions of an individual or organization. It is very important for Extension educators to understand the networks of their clientele in order to perform better and develop more impactful Extension programming for their target audiences. This 5-page fact provides a brief description of network concepts and the terminology used in network studies, so that Extension educators may be more comfortable interpreting and using the results of SNA research to improve the efficiency and productivity of Extension organizations. Written by Anil Kumar Chaudhary and Laura A. Warner, and published by the UF Department of Agricultural Education and Communication, February 2015.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/wc195

Introduction to Social Network Research: Application of Social Network Analysis in Extension

Figure 2. Network map of UM Extension by program area. Viewed from a network perspective, we are all part of a network of relationships that is interwoven like a fishing net, providing both opportunities for and constraints on our behavior. Social network analysis (SNA) is a new approach to defining and describing society and its organizations and to assessing the impact of organizational structures. This 4-page fact sheet introduces Extension educators to possible ways to apply SNA in their work to plan and evaluate programs in a more efficient way. Written by Anil Kumar Chaudhary and Laura A. Warner, and published by the UF Department of Agricultural Education and Communication, February 2015.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/wc196

The Savvy Survey #8: Pilot Testing and Pre-Testing Questionnaires

Figure 2. Case study of respondent debriefing.It is a good practice to pre-test a questionnaire after the initial design and formatting are completed. Based on studies conducted by researchers, pre-testing can be implemented using various methods. A number of possible pre-testing methods are described in this 6-page fact sheet was written by Anil Kumar Chaudhary and Glenn D. Israel, and published by the UF Department of Agricultural Education and Communication, December 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/pd072