Mosaic Disease of St. Augustinegrass caused by Sugarcane Mosaic Virus

Figure 1.  Mosaic symptoms on leaf blades of St. Augustinegrass infected with Sugarcane Mosaic Virus Mosaic disease of St. Augustinegrass was first reported in the 1960s in sugarcane producing areas of Palm Beach County, Florida. In the 10 years prior to 2013, less than 5 samples with mild symptoms were brought to the attention of the extension turfgrass pathologist. But in September 2013, an outbreak of the disease occurred in Pinellas County. Leaf symptoms included mosaic, but turned necrotic and the severe dieback that completely killed some infected lawns. In September 2014, lawns infected in 2013 and new lawns started dying in both Pinellas and Palm Beach Counties. Despite the similarity of symptoms to another St. Augustinegrass decline (SAD), as of November 2014, all samples have tested negative for SAD, and positive for presence of Sugarcane Mosaic Virus. This 3-page fact sheet was written by Phil Harmon, and published by the UF Department of Plant Pathology, November 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/pp313

Brown Patch (SSPLP5/LH044)

Brown patch, large patch, or Rhizoctonia blight is a fungal disease observed November through May that infects the leaf area closest to the soil, eventually killing the leaf. This 3-page fact sheet was written by M. L. Elliott and P. F. Harmon and published by the UF Department of Plant Pathology, February 2011.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/lh044

Take-all Root Rot (SSPLP16/LH079)

Take-all root rot, or Bermudagrass decline, is a root rot disease triggered by high rainfall or stress and manifesting as irregular yellow or light green patches two to three weekds after the pathogen has been active in the roots. This 3-page fact sheet was written by M. L. Elliott and P. F. Harmon and published by the UF Department of Plant Pathology, February 2011.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/lh079

Turfgrass Disease Management (SSPLP14/LH040)

Turfgrass diseases are underappreciated because the biological organisms (plant pathogens) causing the problems are rarely observed. Fortunately, grasses maintained using proper cultural practices (water, mowing, and fertility) are not as likely to become diseased or be as severely damaged as grasses that do not receive proper care. This 11-page fact sheet discusses turfgrass diseases, their causal agents, diagnosis, and management. Written by M. L. Elliott and P. F. Harmon and published by the UF Department of Plant Pathology, February 2011.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/lh040

Cercospora Leaf Spot (SSPLP57/LH082)

Cercospora leaf spot is a fungal disease of St. Augustinegrass observed during periods of frequent rainfall. This revised 2-page fact sheet was written by M. L. Elliott and P. F. Harmon, and published by the UF Department of Plant Pathology, February 2011.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/lh082

Rust (SSPLP12/LH051)

Rust is a fungal disease that occurs in cool weather causing yellow specks enlarging to spots with orange pustules in St. Augustinegrass and zoysiagrass. This revised 2-page fact sheet was written by M. L. Elliott and P. F. Harmon, and published by the UF Department of Plant Pathology, February 2011.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/lh051

Pythium Root Rot (SSPLP11/LH050)

This fungal root disease affecting all warm-season turfgrasses is associated with wet soil conditions causes nonspecific decline in turf quality. This revised 2-page fact sheet was written by M. L. Elliott and P. F. Harmon, and published by the UF Department of Plant Pathology, February 2011.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/lh050

Helminthosporium Leaf Spot (SSPLP9/LH048)

This fungal disease is most serious on bermudagrass and acts over a wide range of temperatures. This 2-page fact sheet was written by M. L. Elliott and P. F. Harmon, and published by the UF Department of Plant Pathology, February 2011.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/lh048