Best Practices for Scalloping: From the Boat to Your Plate

scallops on ice Tommy Thompson

Recreational scalloping in Florida is a popular group activity for many residents and visitors throughout the summer months. This 6-page fact sheet written by Brittany Hall-Scharf, Sarah Ellis, and Savanna Barry and published by the UF/IFAS Florida Sea Grant College Program lists the legal requirements for boating and scalloping, provides a safety plan to minimize and/or prevent accidents while you’re out on the water, and explains proper shucking methods to ensure that the meals you make from your catch will be safe and delicious.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/sg158

Recreational Harvesting of the Florida Bay Scallop: Taylor County

This useful brochure includes a full-color map identifying access routes to the boat ramps and marinas in southern Taylor County near Steinhatchee and Keaton Beach plus the latest information on scallops and scalloping, the recommended equipment you will want to bring, and a few tasty recipes for preparing Florida’s best summertime catch. Written by Victor Blanco and published by the UF/IFAS Extension Florida Sea Grant College Program.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/sg146

Recreational Harvest of the Florida Bay Scallop: Hernando County

scallop in hand UF/IFAS

This useful brochure written by Brittany Hall-Scharf and published by the UF/IFAS Florida Sea Grant College Program includes a full-color map identifying access routes to the boat ramps and marinas in Hernando County. Also find the latest information on scallops and scalloping, the recommended equipment you will want to bring, and a few tasty recipes for preparing Florida’s best summertime catch.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/sg148

Recreational Harvesting of the Florida Bay Scallop: Wakulla County

Florida bay scallop abstract

This handy brochure includes a full-color map identifying access routes to the boat ramps and marinas in Wakulla County, plus the latest information on scallops and scalloping, the recommended equipment you will want to bring, and a few tasty recipes for preparing Florida’s best summertime catch. Written by Savanna Barry and published by the UF/IFAS Extension Florida Sea Grant College Program.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/sg149

Recreational Harvesting of the Florida Bay Scallop: Citrus County

Florida bay scallop eyes

This handy brochure written by Savanna Barry and published by the UF/IFAS Florida Sea Grant College Program includes a full-color map identifying access routes to the boat ramps and marinas in Citrus County near Homosassa and Crystal River, plus the latest information on scallops and scalloping, the recommended equipment you will want to bring, and a few tasty recipes for preparing Florida’s best summertime catch.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/sg147

Recreational Harvesting of the Florida Bay Scallop: Pasco County

Florida bay scallops

This useful brochure written by Brittany Hall-Scharf and published by the UF/IFAS Extension Florida Sea Grant College Program includes a full-color map identifying access routes to the boat ramps and marinas in Pasco County, plus the latest information on scallops and scalloping, the recommended equipment you will want to bring, and a few tasty recipes for preparing Florida’s best summertime catch.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/sg157

Managing High Water Levels in Florida's Largest Lake: Lake Okeechobee

Figure 1. A photo of Lake Okeechobee, looking out over the western marsh region to the open waters of the large lake. Credit: South Florida Water Management District
This 7-page fact sheet written by Karl E. Havens and published by the Florida Sea Grant College Program, UF/IFAS Extension, provides a history of Lake Okeechobee regulation schedules and an overview of the risks, constraints, and trade-offs that the US Army Corps of Engineers must consider when deciding to release flood water from the lake.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/sg154

The Future of Harmful Algal Blooms in Florida Inland and Coastal Waters

summer 2016, the Microcystis from Lake Okeechobee was carried downstream in the St. Lucie River to the estuary Ed Phlips, UF/IFAS

Microscopic algae in oceans and inland waters sometimes grow to excessive levels called “blooms.” Warmer water temperatures and increased nutrient levels exacerbate blooms, and when nutrients are high, temperature increases of just a few degrees cause exponential increases of algae and blooms. This 4-page fact sheet written by Karl Havens and published by the Florida Sea Grant College Program and UF/IFAS Extension explains why algal blooms can be harmful and provides advice for communities seeking to reduce nutrient levels in their lakes, streams, and other bodies of water. In a warmer future, harmful algal blooms will be much more challenging to control than they are today.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/sg153

Responsible Boating Protects Seagrass Meadows

Florida leads the country in the number of registered recreational watercraft, with between 867,463 and 921,834 vessels in the state. With so many people out enjoying Florida’s waters, there is significant risk of damage to sensitive coastal habitats such as seagrass meadows. This 4-page fact sheet written by Savanna Barry, Ana Zangroniz, and Joy Hazell and published by the UF/IFAS Florida Sea Grant College Program explains the importance of protecting seagrass meadows by responsible boating and gives tips to boaters about how to practice seagrass-safe boating.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/sg151

Responsible Boating Protects Coral Reefs

Florida is often referred to as the boating capital of the nation, with more than 930,000 registered vessels. Florida’s numerous natural resources such as mangroves, seagrasses, estuaries and coral reefs are a major draw to resident and visiting boaters alike. Outdoor activities associated with boating, such as birding, fishing, swimming, snorkeling, and diving, contribute to the state’s economy. However, increased traffic on the water can bring potential risks, particularly to sensitive ocean bottom habitats such as coral reefs and seagrasses. This 4-page fact sheet written by Ana Zangroniz, Savanna Barry, and Joy Hazell and published by the UF/IFAS Florida Sea Grant College Program gives an introduction to the corals and coral reefs of Florida, provides ecological and economic information, and lists simple steps to ensure that safe boating practices reduce physical impacts on coral reefs.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/sg152

Oil Spill Science: Sea Grant Programs of the Gulf of Mexico: Persistence, Fate, and Effectiveness of Dispersants used During the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill

This 9-page fact sheet concerns the use of dispersants in response to the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill, the first spill that occurred in the deep ocean, nearly a mile below the surface. The large-scale applications of dispersants used at the surface and wellhead during the Deepwater Horizon oil spill raised many questions about dispersants and highlighted the importance of understanding their effects on the marine environment. Written by Monica Wilson, Larissa Graham, Christine Hale, Emily Maung-Douglass, Stephen Sempier, and LaDon Swann and published by the Florida Sea Grant College Program, the fact sheet was selected for publication on EDIS by Monica Wilson. Originally published at the National Sea Grant Library: https://eos.ucs.uri.edu/EOS_Linked_Documents/gomsg/EX-GOMRI-1%20-%20Wilson_M_2015.pdf
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/sg150

Recreational Harvesting of the Florida Bay Scallop: Citrus County

Scallops, snorkeling equipment, and scallopers off the coast

This publication includes a full-color map identifying access routes to the boat ramps and marinas in Citrus County near Homosassa and Crystal River, plus the latest information on scallops and scalloping, the recommended equipment you will want to bring, and a few tasty recipes for preparing Florida’s best summertime catch. Written by Savanna Barry and published by the Florida Sea Grant College Program.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/sg147

Recreational Harvesting of the Florida Bay Scallop: Steinhatchee and Keaton Beach areas, Taylor County

Scalloping in the Gulf of Mexico.

A full-color map identifying access routes to the boat ramps and marinas in southern Taylor County near Steinhatchee and Keaton Beach, plus the latest information on scallops and scalloping, the recommended equipment you will want to bring, and a few tasty recipes for preparing Florida’s best summertime catch. Written by Victor Blanco and published by the Florida Sea Grant College Program.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/sg146

Recreational Harvest of the Florida Bay Scallop: Hernando County

A man scalloping off in the Gulf of Mexico.

A full-color map identifying access routes to the boat ramps and marinas in Hernando County, plus the latest information on scallops and scalloping, the recommended equipment you will want to bring, and a few tasty recipes for preparing Florida’s best summertime catch. Written by Brittany Hall-Scharf and published by the Florida Sea Grant College Program.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/sg148

Oysters for the Future: Proper Oyster Culling Techniques Matter

man's hands using oyster-culling tool

The eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica) provides many important functions in coastal environments, from serving a crucial role in the estuary’s food web to improving water quality for beachgoers and wildlife. Oysters are also a popular food choice for people. At times the commercial industry landings value has topped $8 million annually in Florida. This 2-page facts sheet written by Erik Lovestrand and published by the Florida Sea Grant College Program is one in a series that highlights some of the key ecological and human factors important to the long-term sustainability of this valuable fishery.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/sg143

Oysters for the Future: Oystering Rules, The Whys and Wherefores

Figure 3. The oyster bed is photographed at low tide when the animals are exposed to the air. These are called inter-tidal oyster beds. In some places in Florida, where the water is deeper in the estuary, the oysters always are underwater. These are called sub-tidal oyster beds. Credit: UF/IFAS photo

The eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica) provides many important functions in coastal environments, from serving a crucial role in the estuary’s food web to improving water quality for beachgoers and wildlife. Oysters are also a popular food choice for people. At times the commercial industry landings value has topped $8 million annually in Florida. This 2-page fact sheet written by Erik Lovestrand and published by the Florida Sea Grant College Program is one in a series that highlights some of the key ecological and human factors important to the long-term sustainability of this valuable fishery.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/sg144

Oysters for the Future: The Value of Science-Based Management in the Oyster Fishery

 Local harvesters participate in restoration efforts in an Apalachicola Bay project

The eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica) provides many important functions in coastal environments, from serving a crucial role in the estuary’s food web to improving water quality for beachgoers and wildlife. Oysters are also a popular food choice for people. At times the commercial industry landings value has topped $8 million annually in Florida. This 2-page fact sheet written by Erik Lovestrand and published by the Florida Sea Grant College Program is one in a series that highlights some of the key ecological and human factors important to the long-term sustainability of this valuable fishery.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/sg145

Planning for Recreational Waterway Access in Rural Coastal Settings

A pier in the Florida Keys.

Increasing demand for waterfront land throughout the United States is a long-term trend with a profound impact on the public's ability to access coasts and waterways for recreation. Overcrowding at beaches, boat ramps, and popular destinations in Florida's densely populated coastal areas leads more Floridians and tourists to consider recreating in rural coastal communities that still offer the solitude and natural settings desired by many. According to a recent report sponsored by the Outdoor Industry Association, the provision of public water access has increased outdoor recreation tourism, which could bring much-needed economic benefits to rural areas. However, many of these communities lack planning resources to measure local support and user needs and to estimate the benefits that investments in public-access infrastructure might bring. This 6-page fact sheet written by Corina Guevara, Charles Sidman, Robert Swett, and Alan Hodges and published by the Florida Sea Grant College Program describes an approach those communities can use to characterize user needs and to quantify local economic benefits derived from public-access infrastructure with a focus on boat ramp facilities.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/sg141