The Art of Goodbye: Communication Considerations

Upfront discussions about expectations could potentially offset or defuse future problems.People are frequently at a loss for the best way to begin a discussion about end-of-life concerns with loved ones and health care providers and are also unsure of the topics they should cover. Nonetheless, conversations about end-of-life care and advance directives can help ensure that the person’s wishes are honored. These measures also eliminate much of the difficult decision-making that loved ones typically face at the time of their loved ones’ passing. This 5-page fact sheet, part of a new series entitled The Art of Goodbye, discusses the barriers to discussing the end of life and the process of communication with loved ones and health care providers. Written by Suzanna Smith, Lynda Spence, and Chelsea Tafelski, and published by the UF Department of Family, Youth and Community Sciences, October 2016.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fy1470

The Art of Goodbye: Why People Are Talking About the End of Life

This series is for individuals who want to be able to communicate effectively with family and/or friends about important end-of-life decisions.Mortality has been a taboo subject for many years. Many cultural, demographic, educational, and policy changes have played a part in a shift toward an increased openness to talking about death as a natural part of life in the United States. This 5-page fact sheet is the first publication in a new series entitled The Art of Goodbye, and it covers changes in living and dying, preferences for the end of life, roles of substitute decision makers in health care, and communication. Written by Suzanna Smith and Lynda Spence, and published by the UF Department of Family, Youth and Community Sciences, October 2016.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fy1468

The Art of Goodbye: Exploring Self-Reflection

Collecting your thoughts in your own space and time can help inform future conversations with loved ones.

Many people assume that preparing for the end of life involves filling out forms at the doctor’s or lawyer’s office. Forms and checklists have their place and can be helpful, but they cannot address every issue because end-of-life concerns are complicated. Self-reflection is a helpful tool that begins to lay a foundation for planning while articulating people’s complex and unique emotions, values, priorities, fears, and preferences when it comes to facing their own mortality. This 4-page fact sheet is the second publication in a new series entitled The Art of Goodbye, and it covers resources that can help individuals explore their personal concerns and values before initiating end-of-life discussions with loved ones. Written by Lynda Spence and Chelsea Tafelski, and published by the UF Department of Family, Youth and Community Sciences, July 2016.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fy1465

The Art of Goodbye: Exploring Health Concerns

Thinking, discussing, and acting ahead of time will help reduce the social discomfort associated with death and dying.

Issues and questions about care at the end of life are as unique and complex as the individual receiving care. The condition and culture of the patient and family, religion, spirituality, education, occupation, social class, friends, and personal preferences can affect end-of-life care. Sometimes decisions are made by the individual patient. At other times, the family and health care providers are involved. This 6-page fact sheet, part of a new series entitled The Art of Goodbye, explores health concerns and discusses aspects and types of care at the end of life. Written by Lynda Spence, and published by the UF Department of Family, Youth and Community Sciences, July 2016.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fy1467

The Art of Goodbye: Planning Final Arrangements

Thinking, discussing, and acting ahead of time will help reduce the social discomfort associated with death and dying.

The consumer is faced with complex personal decisions while making final arrangements. Final arrangements might include a religious ritual, service, tribute, funeral, and/or burial. This 7-page fact sheet, part of a new series entitled The Art of Goodbye series, is designed to help in the development of a final arrangements plan using a coordinated approach. This document discusses the Funeral Rule, determinants, funeral providers, types of final arrangements, tissue or organ donation, body donation, preplanning, and prepaying. Written by Lynda Spence, and published by the UF Department of Family, Youth and Community Sciences, July 2016.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fy1466