Breast Cancer: When the Woman You Love Has Breast Cancer

Images of Rahim Remtulla working at the Hillman Cancer Center in Pittsburgh for the CALS lookbook project.

For the person with breast cancer, a diagnosis causes her life to suddenly and dramatically change. As treatment progresses, the patient has a multitude of doctor visits, procedures, and often support groups to keep her busy and focused. Her partner's challenges are also significant, but unfortunately they are frequently overlooked. This 4-page fact sheet is the second document in a 12-part series on breast cancer. It provides perspectives and suggestions for persons who are accompanying a woman through breast cancer treatment. Written by Martha C. Monroe, Barbara F. Shea, and Linda B. Bobroff, and published by the UF/IFAS Department of Family, Youth and Community Sciences, revised April 2018.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fy896

Raising Healthy Children: Age Five

Alachua County kindergarten students touch a 2-month-old calf during the annual dairy-day event held at the University of Florida's Dairy Science Unit in Hague, Friday - Dec. 12, 2003. Children tour the facility, learn about dairy production and even enjoy some ice cream. Students in UF's College of Agricultural and Life Sciences organized the event.

This publication is designed to give you some information about the social, mental, and physical development of your five-year-old child. This new 5-page fact sheet discusses nutrition, eating behaviors, healthy food options, cooking activities, and physical activity. Written by Claire Marie Fassett and Karla P. Shelnutt, and published by the UF/IFAS Department of Family, Youth and Community Sciences, January 2018.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fy1475

The Art of Goodbye: Communication Considerations

Upfront discussions about expectations could potentially offset or defuse future problems.People are frequently at a loss for the best way to begin a discussion about end-of-life concerns with loved ones and health care providers and are also unsure of the topics they should cover. Nonetheless, conversations about end-of-life care and advance directives can help ensure that the person’s wishes are honored. These measures also eliminate much of the difficult decision-making that loved ones typically face at the time of their loved ones’ passing. This 5-page fact sheet, part of a new series entitled The Art of Goodbye, discusses the barriers to discussing the end of life and the process of communication with loved ones and health care providers. Written by Suzanna Smith, Lynda Spence, and Chelsea Tafelski, and published by the UF Department of Family, Youth and Community Sciences, October 2016.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fy1470

The Art of Goodbye: Why People Are Talking About the End of Life

This series is for individuals who want to be able to communicate effectively with family and/or friends about important end-of-life decisions.Mortality has been a taboo subject for many years. Many cultural, demographic, educational, and policy changes have played a part in a shift toward an increased openness to talking about death as a natural part of life in the United States. This 5-page fact sheet is the first publication in a new series entitled The Art of Goodbye, and it covers changes in living and dying, preferences for the end of life, roles of substitute decision makers in health care, and communication. Written by Suzanna Smith and Lynda Spence, and published by the UF Department of Family, Youth and Community Sciences, October 2016.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fy1468

Grandparents Raising Grandchildren: Custody Options

Woman with her two daughters.Grandparents have several custody options when they are caring for their grandchildren. To decide which options match your needs, you must become familiar with legal terms. This brochure provides information on custody options, situation scenarios, and legal resources. Written by Larry F. Forthun and Millie Ferrer-Chancy with assistance from the Legal Aid Foundation, and published by the UF Department of Family, Youth and Community Sciences. Revised December 2015.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fy433

Breast Cancer: Preparing for Surgery

Images of Rahim Remtulla working at the Hillman Cancer Center in Pittsburgh for the CALS lookbook project.Once you and your doctor schedule your breast cancer surgery, you may have additional questions about how you can prepare for your operation. This 5-page fact sheet provides information to help you get ready for breast cancer surgery through a brief overview of common surgical options, medical appointments, social support systems, and standard surgical procedures as well as reactions and memories of women who have gone through this experience. Written by Martha C. Monroe and Barbara F. Shea, and published by the UF Department of Family, Youth and Community Sciences. Revised February 2016.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fy899

Consejos para pleanear contra desastres para gente mayor

Through its Hurricane Preparedness for Hotels and Motels Program, the Florida Energy Extension Service helps the tourist industry keep guests safe during lightning storms.FY1462 is the Spanish language version of FY620, Disaster Planning Tips for Older Adults. This 4-page publication offers an abundance of information pertaining to water storage and use, food, first aid, important papers, electronics, medical needs, stress reduction, and evacuation which can help older adults plan for natural disasters and other emergencies. Written by Carolyn Wilken, Linda B. Bobroff, and Emily Minton, and published by the Department of Family, Youth and Community Sciences, May 2003.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fy1462

Reporting Domestic Violence in Florida

Figure 1. After contacting the police about an incident of domestic violence in Florida, there are laws in place to protect you. Credit: iStock/Thinkstock.comBeing in a violent relationship can be both a terrifying and hopeless experience. Likewise, the legal process can be both an extensive and complicated process. In this 2-page fact sheet, we address what to expect when reporting the violence to law enforcement. Written by Kathleen Beall and Heidi Radunovich, and published by the UF Department of Family Youth and Community Sciences, December 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fy1454

What Is Domestic Violence?

Figure 1. Emotional abuse does not leave physical scars but can injure a person’s self-worth. Credit: iStock/Thinkstock.comDomestic violence can come in many forms and can happen to anyone. It is found all across the world and has a long-standing history in nearly every society. Domestic violence can present itself in many different ways, including sexual violence, physical violence, and emotional violence. In this 3-page fact sheet, we break down each of these types of abuse further to better understand what they really mean. Written by Kathleen Beall and Heidi Radunovich, and published by the UF Department of Family Youth and Community Sciences, December 2014. (Photo: iStock/Thinkstock.com)
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fy1453

Filing a Restraining Order in Florida

Figure 1. There are legal protections to keep you safe while you file for an injunction. Credit: iStock/Thinkstock.comAfter a charge or arrest for domestic violence, the abuser may still find ways to cause harm. One of the most common threats faced after ending a violent relationship is stalking. Stalking is when someone repeatedly follows, harasses, or makes threats against you. Fortunately, there are laws and legal protections that can work to keep you safe if you are stalked. The first and often most powerful of these protections is filing an injunction. In this 3-page fact sheet, Kathleen Beall and Heidi Radunovich explore what an injunction is, how it is filed, and what it protects you against. Published by the UF Department of Family Youth and Community Sciences, December 2014. Photo: (iStock/Thinkstock.com)
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fy1455

Raising Healthy Children: Age Four

Figure 3. A bike ride with your child is great way to show him or her how to lead an active lifestyle.As children continue their preschool years, they learn many new things and develop their own opinions and ideas. During this time, people inside and outside of the home may greatly influence them. As preschoolers continue to learn and grow, caregivers can take many steps to guide their children in a healthy and positive direction. This 4-page fact sheet was written by Kate Bennet, Gail Kauwell, and Karla P. Shelnutt, and published by the UF Department of Family Youth and Community Sciences, April 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fy1398

Women and Money: Unique Issues – So You Want to Remarry? (FCS7249/FY1353)

Figure 1. If you plan on remarrying, you should examine your and your future spouse’s finances to make sure there are no surprises going into the marriage.Whether widowed or divorced, if a second marriage is in your future, it may be advisable to look before you leap. Second marriages have a higher failure rate than first marriages. They are often more complex and have stresses not found in many first marriages. Take your time to consider all of the financial circumstances between you and your future spouse before you remarry. This 3-page fact sheet was written by Diann Douglas, Martie Gillen, and Lynda Spence, and published by the UF Department of Family Youth and Community Sciences, March 2013.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fy1353

Promoting Healthy Relationship Development in Teens, Part II: Three Key Qualities to Foster Better Relationships (FCS2326/FY1364)

Figure 1. Relationships and marriages where both partners are kind, nurturing, affectionate, sympathetic, and caring tend to be more satisfying.Getting married and staying married require a complicated calculus of factors that must come together to produce healthy and satisfying relationships. While couple interactional processes tend to be the most predictive of whether or not they will stay together and find happiness, background and contextual factors and individual traits also factor heavily into the equation. Finding two socks that match (and don’t wear out) is much more likely to occur when the relationship is based upon a deep and enduring friendship. Asking the question, “Will this choice enhance or diminish my marital friendship?” and then choosing to make the choices that will enhance the marital friendship more often than not are healthy strategies for success. This 5-page fact sheet was written by Victor W. Harris, Gilon Marts, and Muthusami Kumaran, and published by the UF Department of Family Youth and Community Sciences, March 2013.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fy1364

Kinship Caregivers: Understanding Children and the Military Deployment Cycle (FCS2330/FY1368)

Military Man Hugs DaughterDeployment occurs in almost every branch of the military, and the experience differs for each family and each family member. To reflect the diversity of experiences, military professionals have proposed various models of the deployment cycle to assist families in the transition. There are at least five phases that are common across models: pre-deployment, deployment, sustainment, preparation (also known as redeployment), and reunification (or home-coming). Recognizing that each family is unique, this deployment cycle is intended not as a rule-book but as a helpful guide to families as they experience deployment of a parent. This 4-page fact sheet was written by Elizabeth Thomas and Larry F. Forthun, and published by the UF Department of Family Youth and Community Sciences, March 2013.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fy1368

Family Reunification Following Foster Care (FCS2328/FY1366)

family sillouhetted against horizonFamilies reuniting after an intervention that requires foster care for the children face unique challenges. Parents in these situations may need to learn about their parental roles, the basic needs for the healthy development of their children, and resources that will help the family in their reunification. Researchers and practitioners in child welfare have provided helpful information to develop workable plans to aid families in reunifying and rebuilding. This 5-page fact sheet is a brief summary of the overarching themes provided by the literature. Written by Rosalyn Monroe and Victor W. Harris, and published by the UF Department of Family Youth and Community Sciences, April 2013.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fy1366

Promoting Healthy Relationship Development in Teens, Part I: How Dating Smart in Youth Can Foster Better Relationships in Adulthood (FCS2325/FY1363)

Figure 1. Healthy dating relationships can lead to healthy marriages. Cultivating healthy dating relationships that can lead to healthy adult romantic and marriage relationships is a science that reflects a complicated calculus of the premarital influences that may shape future relationship stability, quality, and satisfaction. This 4-page fact sheet was written by Victor W. Harris, Gilon Marts, and Martie Gillen, and published by the UF Department of Family Youth and Community Sciences, March 2013.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fy1363

What Is a Healthy Dating or Marriage Relationship? (FCS2323/FY1361)

ure 1. The majority of Americans will marry at some point in their lives, making it important to understand what a healthy dating and marriage relationship is.Defining what a healthy romantic relationship is can be challenging. Thankfully, modern research has given us a good idea of what healthy dating and marriage relationships look like. Use this fact sheet to determine what a healthy relationship looks like to you. Then take the survey to get an idea of the strengths already present in your relationship and those things you may want to work on. This 3-page fact sheet was written by Victor W. Harris, and published by the UF Department of Family Youth and Community Sciences, March 2013.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fy1361

Why Fragile Families Don’t Marry (FAR3003/FM013)

wedding rings on a weathered surface“He can’t support us. Why should I marry him?” This mom is not alone in her resistance to matrimony. In fact, increasing evidence has many of the opponents of the Healthy Marriage Initiative on the offensive. While the reauthorization of the welfare reform bill will allocate substantial funds to states for the development of programs for improving relations between unmarried parents, those who challenge the bill argue that marriage is not the answer… This 2-page Family Album Radio transcript was written by Donna Davis, and published by the UF Department of Family Youth and Community Sciences, February 2013.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fm013

Parent Time (FAR0401/FM008)

couple holding sleeping newbornParenting an infant is one of the most exciting and fulfilling opportunities of a lifetime. At the same time, it can be one of the most stressful periods in a person’s life. Research has shown that babies as young as one month old can sense and will be affected by a parent who is depressed or angry. Finding the delicate balance between the new parents’ needs and the baby’s needs is very important. This 2-page Family Album Radio transcript was written by Donna Davis, and published by the UF Department of Family Youth and Community Sciences, February 2013.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fm008

Saying Goodbye: Military Deployments (FAR0013/FM072)

soldier holds girl with flag“Those last few hugs, the last few kisses, the last few goodbyes are what many military families across the United States have experienced when seeing a loved one leave for deployment. An estimated 1.4 million servicemen and women serve as active duty members in the Army, Navy, Marine Corps, or Air Force. Deployments are nothing new in the military community. However, during these times of separation, family members of those serving, especially the children, undergo many hardships. Studies show children’s reactions to separation can even lead to depression.” This 2-page Family Album Radio transcript was written by Alexandra Ulrich and Suzanna Smith, and published by the UF Department of Family Youth and Community Sciences, November 2012.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fm072