School-Based 4-H Programming: Getting Started

Figure 1. Children can learn the science of life through the 4-H Embryology Project. Credit: Marcus Boston, UF/IFAS

School-based programs provide an opportunity to youth who would not be able to participate in traditional 4-H club offerings otherwise. If you want to expand your 4-H program in diversity, subject matter, and/or number of youth reached, school-based programming may be the solution for you. This 6-page document discusses school-based programs, differences between school-based programming and traditional club programming, reasons to start school-based programs, ways to work with school sites, and enrollment for school-based program youth. It is part of the 4-H 101 Fact Sheet series. Written by Vanessa Spero-Swingle and Susan Munyan, and published by the UF/IFAS 4-H Youth Development Department, April 2018.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/4h389

Developing and Strengthening Networks to Promote Resilience After Disasters

Extension agent Angie Lindsey (left, blue shirt) talking with Apalachicola community partners concerning oil spill recovery research. Photo taken 10-24-16.

The HGHC series includes thirteen publications that focus on the work of the community outreach and dissemination team, including community engagement, outreach, and research result dissemination. This 3-page document focuses on developing and strengthening networks before they are challenged to promote resilience in and after a disaster. Written by Angela B. Lindsey, Samantha Goldenberg, and Cassie Wandersee, and published by the UF/IFAS Department of Family, Youth and Community Sciences, April 2018.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fy1477

How Likely Is a 100-Year Rainfall Event During the Next Ten Years?

Storm rising over a farm.

This 4-page fact sheet describes proper interpretation of rainfall event probabilities and recurrence intervals, particularly as they are used by engineers and water resources managers in the design and construction of hydraulic structures, such as dams, levees, and canals. This article focuses on rainfall, but its explanations and concepts can be applied to other extreme hydrologic phenomena such as flood and drought. Written by Young Gu Her, William Lusher, and Kati Migliaccio, and published by the UF/IFAS Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering, March 2018.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ae523

Recruiting and Retaining Members in Agricultural Organizations

Many organizations struggle with recruiting new members and retaining current members. The UF/IFAS PIE Center conducted membership surveys of the Florida Cattlemen’s Association and Florida CattleWomen to aid both groups in their membership efforts. This 3-page document discusses common membership barriers and practices in order to help agricultural organizations be better equipped to attract new members and keep current ones. Written by Ricky Telg and published by the UF/IFAS Department of Agricultural Education and Communication, March 2018.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/wc300

Public Policy Issues in Florida: 2017-18 Constitution Revision Commission (CRC)

Florida flag

It is an exciting time in Florida public policy; the once-in-every-two-decades Constitution Revision Commission is in the process of recommending changes to the Florida state constitution. This 4-page fact sheet written by Rodney L. Clouser and published by the UF/IFAS Food and Resource Economics Department describes the process and explains how to get involved, evaluate the proposals for changes to the constitution, and cast an informed vote in November 2018.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fe1035

Important Resources for the Development and Sustainability of School Garden Programs

Extension agents serve as a valuable resource in providing teachers with in-service training and technical education to increase their ability to effectively use gardening as an instructional tool. This three-page document provides an outline of important resources to help in the development and sustainability of a school garden program. Written by John M. Diaz and Erin Elsberry and published by the Department of Agricultural Education and Communication.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/wc283

Reframing Leadership

Effective leadership is essential in the businesses where we work, the institutions where we learn and in the communities where we live. Our own leadership is a product of how we see the world. This three-page article looks at Bolman and Deal’s book Reframing Organizations and the different frames to address organizational issues and leadership. Written by Matthew Sowcik, Hannah Carter, and Valerie McKee and published by the Department of Agricultural Education and Communication.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/wc284

Getting Engaged: Resources to Support Community Engagement Practices

UF/IFAS Extension sign sitting on peanuts Photo Credits: UF/IFAS Photo by Amy Stuart

This document is part of a series called Getting Engaged (http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/topic_series_getting_engaged), designed to help Extension and research faculty and other community engagement professionals improve their engagement with a variety of stakeholder audiences. This four-page document offers resources for practitioners at all stages, from those just beginning to think about engagement to those who have been engaging their communities for years. Written by Kathryn A. Stofer and published by the Department of Agricultural Education and Communication.
http://edis.ifas.ufl/edu/wc273

Developing County Associations for School and Community Gardens

Increasingly, gardeners receive attention for the educational, environmental, health, and social impacts that their projects facilitate within schools and communities. Garden associations allow Extension to play a vital role in providing technical information to support new and existing gardens. This three-page fact sheet outlines the framework used by a pilot garden association program in Polk County, Florida. Written by John M. Diaz, Susan Tyler Webb, and Erin Elsberry and published by the Department of Agriculture Education and Communication.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/wc279

Building for Birds Evaluation Tool: Breeding and Wintering Habitat for Forest Birds

A woodpecker on an oak tree.  UF/IFAS Photo: Thomas Wright.

Several bird species use forest fragments and trees conserved in built areas as breeding, wintering, and stopover habitat. Scientists have created a Building for Birds online tool to help these birds and the people who appreciate them. This evaluation tool is most useful for small developments or developments in already fragmented landscapes.

The tool is designed for use when no opportunity is available to conserve large forest areas of 125 acres or more within a proposed development. Developers are sometimes reluctant to conserve trees and forest fragments in subdivided residential/commercial areas because it costs time and money, but there is value in this conservation effort not only for many different species of forest birds, but for future homeowners waking to birdsong in the mornings.

This 17-page fact sheet written by Mark Hostetler and Jan-Michael Archer and published by the Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation describes the online tool and shows how it can help preserve breeding and wintering habitat for migrating birds.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/uw417

Building for Birds Evaluation Tool: Forest Fragments Used as Stopover Sites by Migrant Birds

Western meadowlark perched on a fence post near Ona, Florida. UF/IFAS Photo by Tyler Jones.

Several bird species use forest fragments and trees conserved in built areas as breeding, wintering, and stopover habitat. Scientists have created a Building for Birds online tool to help these birds and the people who appreciate them. This evaluation tool is most useful for small developments or developments in already fragmented landscapes.

The tool is designed for use when no opportunity is available to conserve large forest areas of 125 acres or more within a proposed development. Developers are sometimes reluctant to conserve trees and forest fragments in subdivided residential/commercial areas because it costs time and money, but there is value in this conservation effort not only for many different species of forest birds, but for future homeowners waking to birdsong in the mornings.

This 18-page fact sheet written by Mark Hostetler and Jan-Michael Archer and published by the Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation describes the online tool and shows how it can help preserve stopover habitat for migrating birds.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/uw416

Starting a Community Garden

Community Garden
A community garden is a great way to unite a group of people in a common goal. In addition to providing fresh herbs, vegetables, and fruit, community gardens can also increase self-esteem, beautify a neighborhood, and create and opportunity for socializing and improving health. This four-page fact sheet outlines the importance of community gardens and how to develop and manage a community garden. Written by Adrian Hunsberger, Eva C. Worden, and John McLaughlin, and published by the Environmental Horticulture Department.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep124

How the General Public and Local Officials Prefer to Learn about Agricultural Water Use in Florida

Sprinklers watering athletic fields. UF/IFAS Phto by Tyler Jones.
Water is a precious resource that is invaluable to the state of Florida. The amount of water being used daily in the state is estimated at 14.3 million gallons. Part of a series dedicated to describing the preferred ways of learning about agricultural water use in Florida, this study can be used to assist Extension educators and the agricultural industry at large in the development of strategies meant to inform people about the realities of water use. This three-page fact sheet helps Extension educators understand preferred learning mediums so they can provide useful information about agricultural water use. Written by Courtney T. Owens, Alexa J. Lamm, and Ricky W. Telg and published by the Agricultural Education and Communication Department.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/wc247

Conservation Subdivision: Post-construction Phase: Creating Signs to Educate Residents

sign
Installing educational signs is one way to increase awareness and participation in conservation activities. This six-page fact sheet written by Mark Hostetler and published by the Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation explains how to create educational signs and install them in residential neighborhoods as a way to inform residents about biodiversity conservation. The fact sheet, one of the UF/IFAS Conservation Subdivision series, explains how to design effective signs, how to manage a series of signs to keep the information fresh, and how to maintain the signs to ensure that residents and visitors to the community continue to benefit and maintain their homes, yards, and neighborhoods sustainably for years to come.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/uw407

Writing Instructional Objectives

Elaine Turner at the chalkboard.
Good teaching begins with well-written instructional objectives. Instructional objectives identify the knowledge, skills, and abilities that students will possess upon successfully learning the material. This four-page fact sheet outlines the three types of objectives (cognitive, psychomotor, and affective) as well as the different components of objectives (condition, performance, criterion). A well-written instructional objective will lead to clear teaching and ultimately, student success. Written by R. Kirby Barrick and Andrew C. Thoron, and published by the Agricultural Education and Communication Department.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/wc245

What Else Can Surface Water Buffer Systems Do?: Exploring Multiple Ecosystem Services

A night sky image with star trails over greenhouses at the Plant Science Research and Education Center in Citra, Florida. Stars, lake, pond, water, oak tree, reflection. Image used in the 2012 Annual Research Report.As society confronts the consequences of global warming, deteriorating water quality, and impoverished biodiversity, there is a growing urgency to develop and expand water buffers' multifunctional ecosystem services. However, limited information is available on other potential co-benefits associated with the use of buffers, particularly VFSs. This 5-page fact sheet provides information on buffers' multiple ecosystem benefits, such as niche products production, carbon sequestration, and flood risk mitigation, as well as recommendations on future research needs necessary to enhance multiple ecosystem services and benefits of buffers. Written by Lei Wu, Rafael Muñoz-Carpena, and Yuncong Li, and published by the UF Department of Soil and Water Science, November 2015.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ss647

Economic Contributions and Ecosystem Services of Springs in the Lower Suwannee and Santa Fe River Basins of North-Central Florida

children view manatees at a springThis study examined the economic contributions, consumer surplus, and ecosystem services provided by recreational use of fifteen major springs sites in north central Florida. The estimated annual economic contributions of springs-related recreational spending in north-central Florida for FY 2012/13 are summarized. Among the findings, there was $84.2 million in total visitor spending for springs recreation, and 1,160 full- and part-time jobs. This 4-page fact sheet was written by Tatiana Borisova, Alan W. Hodges, and Thomas J. Stevens, and published by the UF Department of Food and Resource Economics, April 2015.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fe958

Conservation Subdivision: Post-construction Phase: Policy Directions and the Importance of Assessing Stakeholder Opinions

Figure 1. A dragonfly using an urban habitat patch in Gainesville, FL.Simply designating open space in a development is not enough to provide long-term protection for a variety of wildlife. New policies need to be developed that encourage developers of conservation developments to adopt long-term management practices that support biodiversity conservation. This 5-page fact sheet discusses policy options that could be used to support conservation management practices and reports on a survey of Colorado landowners who have created conservation developments and their opinions about a policy option to support the implementation of management practices. Written by Daniel Feinberg and Mark Hostetler, and published by the UF Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation, December 2014. (Photo credit: Daniel Feinberg)
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/uw401