Seed Piece Spacing Adjustment for Florida Chipping Potato

Seed spacing directly affects crop revenue because the number of potato seeds planted determines the final plant population density. The analysis presented in this 5-page publication was extracted from a series of field trials that looked at improved potato plant arrangement in the field by adjusting seed piece spacing for Florida growing conditions. Written by Fernanda Souza Krupek, Steven A. Sargent, Peter J. Dittmar, and Lincoln Zotarelli and published by the UF/IFAS Horticultural Sciences Department, May 2018.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1317

Potato Vine Killing or Desiccation

Pick any vegetable crop - from lettuce and tomatoes to peppers and potatoes - chances are IFAS research is helping Florida farmers produce a superior product for consumers in todays copetitive marketplace.
Proper tuber maturity at harvest is an important factor in producing high-quality fresh-market potatoes. Tuber maturity is generally recognized as an important determinant of storage ability and cooking quality. Maturation can be artificially induced by killing the potato vines prior to harvest. This will benefit tuber appearance, limit tuber size, and improve tuber release from the vine. This four-page fact sheet describes the importance of tuber maturation, potato vine killing timing and available methods, and how to determine when to vine kill and when to harvest after vine kill. Written by Lincoln Zotarelli, Steven Sargent, Peter Dittmar, and Mildred Makani, and published by the Horticultural Sciences Department.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs181

Postharvest Storage, Packaging and Handling of Specialty Crops: A Guide for Florida Small Farm Producers

Figure 7. Thermoformed 28-count produce insert tray for peaches.
Every year farmers must harvest their crops. This process marks the end of the growing season and carries social significance in communities, but it also creates challenges for producers trying to deliver fresh, high-quality produce to market. Good postharvest practices establish appropriate cold chains that maintain the correct temperatures, humidity, and respiration rates while also ensuring the safety, sanitation,and quality of the fruits. These postharvest practices differ, depending on the size and economic situation of an operation. This eighteen-page fact sheet provides postharvest storage, packaging, and handling recommendations for small farm specialty crop producers. Written by Jonathan Adam Watson, Danielle Treadwell, Steven A. Sargent, Jeffrey K. Brecht, and William Pelletier, and published by the Horticultural Sciences Department.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1270

Control of Rapid Postharvest Decays of Tomato Fruit

Figure 11. Fruit picked during a rain shower and then dye added to wet stem scar. What is a rapid postharvest decay? Water-soaked lesions begin within 12 to 18 hours after harvest and continue to develop, producing large amounts of fluids. The decay spreads within cartons of tomatoes, producing wet patches in the bottom and sides of the container, a condition called “wet-boxes.” Affected fruit are out-of-grade either prior to shipment or upon arrival at the receiver.This 5-page fact sheet was written by J. A. Bartz, S. A. Sargent, and D. J. Huber, and published by the UF Department of Horticultural Sciences, December 2014. (Photo: S. R. Bartz)
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs363

Postharvest Quality and Decay Incidence among Tomato Fruit as Affected by Weather and Cultural Practices. (PP294)

Figure 11. Concentric cracking of fruit surface.Postharvest decay losses for field-grown, fresh-market tomatoes are usually associated with harvests that occur when fields are wet and warm. During periods of persistently wet fields, decay pathogens infect damaged fruit on the plant as well as injuries to petioles and stems. Review of all reports and photos implicated excessive water in fruit rather than air temperatures as the primary predisposition. Excessive water in fruit is possible at virtually any time of the season and can appear at times of cold as well as warm field temperatures. This 8-page fact sheet was written by Jerry A. Bartz, Steven A. Sargent, and John W. Scott, and published by the UF Department of Plant Pathology, July 2012.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/pp294

Manual de Prácticas para el Mejor Manejo Postcosecha del Mango (HS1190/HS1190)

This 78-page spanish-language manual includes quality-control procedures to use when monitoring the maturity and quality of mangos in commercial handling operations. It was written by Jeffrey K. Brecht, Steven A. Sargent, Adel A. Kader, Elizabeth J. Mitcham, Fernando Maul, Patrick E. Brecht, Octavio Menocal, and published by the UF Department of Horticultural Sciences, January 2011.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1190

HS1185 Mango Postharvest Best Management Practices Manual

HS1185, a 73-page illustrated monograph by Jeffrey K. Brecht, Steven A. Sargent, Adel A. Kader, Elizabeth J. Mitcham, Fernando Maul, Patrick E. Brecht, Octavio Menocal, is the best management practices manual for harvesting and handling mangos marketed in the U.S. The manual includes quality-control procedures to use when monitoring the maturity and quality of mangos in commercial handling operations. Includes references. Published by the UF Department of Horticultural Sciences, December 2010.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1185

HS1162/HS407 Protected Culture for Vegetable and Small Fruit Crops: High Tunnels for Strawberry Production in Florida

HS1162, a 4-page illustrated fact sheet by Bielinski M. Santos, Teresa P. Salamé-Donoso, Craig K. Chandler, and Steven A. Sargent, presents the results of research comparing the effects of high-tunnel and open-field production on the growth, fruit earliness, and yield of strawberry cultivars in Florida. Published by the UF Department of Horticultural Sciences, March 2010.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs407

HS1148/HS396 Guide for Maintaining the Quality and Safety of Organic Vegetables and Melons During Harvest and Handling Operations

HS-1148, a 7-page fact sheet by Steven A. Sargent and Danielle Treadwell, highlights practical guidelines to assist growers and handlers of organic vegetables and melons to minimize losses during harvest and handling operations. Differences in recommendations between crops grown using organic methods and conventional production methods are noted. Includes references. Published by the UF Department of Horticultural Sciences, March 2009.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/HS396