Biology and Management of Dodder (Cuscuta spp.) in Ornamental Crop Production and Landscape

Dodder are a group of over 150 species in the genus Cuscuta. This 4-page publication was developed to help commercial growers, landscape professionals, and homeowners identify and manage dodder infestations in their greenhouses, nurseries, or landscapes. Written by Kaley Mierek, Chris Marble, Nathan Boyd, and Shawn Steed and published by the UF/IFAS Environmental Horticulture Department, May 2018.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep556

Biology and Management of Liverwort (Marchantia polymorpha) in Ornamental Crop Production

Liverwort is a common weed problem in production nurseries and greenhouses. This article has been written to help growers identify liverwort, understand its biology, and inform them of ways this weed can be managed in their operation. Written by Chris Marble, Marc S. Frank, Dail Laughinghouse, Shawn Steed, and Nathan Boyd, and published by UF’s Environmental Horticulture Department, September 2017.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep542

Biology and Management of Goosegrass (Eleusine indica (L.) Gaertn.) in Ornamental Plant Production

Figure 4. Seed head Credits: Nathan S. Boyd, UF/IFAS

This six-page fact sheet provides information about the biology and management of goosegrass, including preemergence and postemergence control options. Written by Shawn Steed, Christopher Marble, Nathan S. Boyd, Andrew MacRae, and Kiran Fnu and published by the Environmental Horticulture Department.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep538

Biology and Management of Thickhead (Crassocephalum crepidioides) in Ornamental Crop Production

Figure 2. Thickhead cotyledon and first true leaf. Credits: Annette Chandler, UF/IFAS Mid-Florida Research and Education Center

Typically found in shadehouses and shaded areas of nursery production, thickhead grows aggressively in containers and can outcompete nursery crops for water, nutrients, and light. This erect, sparingly branched, herbaceous annual, grows up to 4 feet tall and germinates over a wide range of pH, salt, and temperature conditions. This four-page fact sheet describes thickhead (Crassocephalum crepidioides) and various methods for its control in ornamental crop production. Written by Allison Bechtloff, Shawn Steed, Chris Marble, and Nathan Boyd and published by the Environmental Horticulture Department.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep534

Biology and Management of Pilea microphylla(Artillery weed) in Ornamental Crop Production

Figure 4. Artillery weed in flower. Credits: Annette Chandler, UF/IFAS

This five-page fact sheet describes the biology and management of Pilea microphylla, or artillery weed, for ornamental crop production. Artillery weed occurs primarily in moist, disturbed areas and is thought to be native to South America and parts of North America. It is found throughout Florida. Written by Debalina Saha, Chris Marble, Shawn Steed, and Nathan Boyd and published by the Environmental Horticulture Department.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep535

Biology and Management of American Black Nightshade (Solanum americanum P. Mill.) in Tomato, Pepper, Cucurbit, and Strawberry

Figure 2. American black nightshade leaf (left) and stem (right). Credits: Nathan S. Boyd, UF/IFAS

This three-page fact sheet describes the biology and management of American black nightshade, explaining how to control for it in tomato and pepper, cucurbits, and strawberry. Written by Nathan S. Boyd, Shawn Steed, Chris Marble, and Andrew MacRae and published by the Horticultural Sciences Department.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1176

Biology and Management of Ragweed Parthenium (Parthenium hysterophorous L.) in Ornamental Crop Production

Figure 1. Ragweed parthenium growing in a pot. Note the upright growth habit and the basal rosette leaves. Credits: Annette Chandler, UF/IFAS

This six-page fact sheet provides an overview of Ragweed Parthenium, Parthenium hysterophorous L, including a species description and information on how to manage ragweed parthenium culturally, physically, and chemically. Written by Debalina Saha, Chris Marble, Robert H. Stamps, and Shawn Steed and published by the Environmental Horticulture Department.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep531

Biology and Management of Goosegrass (Eleusine indica (L.) Gaertn.) in Tomatoes, Peppers, Cucurbits, and Strawberries

Figure 2. Goosegrass seedling (left) and mat-like rosette (right). Credits: Nathan S. Boyd, UF/IFAS

This four-page fact sheet gives a brief description of the biology and management of goosegrass, a common annual turf and horticultural weed found throughout Florida that grows well in compact, wet soils and superficially resembles crabgrasses. Written by Nathan S. Boyd, Kiran Fnu, Chris Marble, Shawn Steed, and Andrew W. MacRae and published by the Horticultural Sciences Department.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1178

Biology and Management of Mulberry Weed (Fatoua villosa) in Ornamental Crop Production

Figure 2. Mulberry weed seedlings.

This 4-page fact sheet discusses the characteristics of mulberry weed (Fatoua villosa) and explains how to control its growth in a nursery environment. Written by Chris Marble and Shawn Steed, and published by the UF Department of Environmental Horticulture, April 2015.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep517

Biology and Management of Eclipta (Eclipta prostrata) in Ornamental Crop Production

Figure 2. Eclipta growth in a mulched landscape bed. Note the purplish stems, lanceolate leaves, and prostrate growth habit.Eclipta grows aggressively in containers and can outcompete nursery crops for water, nutrients, and light. Plants flower in as little as five weeks after germination and produce thousands of seeds over the course of a growing season, and stem fragments left on the soil or media surface following hand-weeding or cultivation can root and reproduce vegetatively. This 4-page fact sheet describes the plant, its biology, and recommendations for physical, cultural, and chemical control. Written by Chris Marble, Shawn Steed, and Nathan S. Boyd, and published by the UF Department of Environmental Horticulture, January 2015. (Photo: Annette Chandler, UF/IFAS)
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep512

Biology and Management of Hairy Bittercress (Cardamine hirsute) in Ornamental Crop Production

Figure 1. Bittercress with clumping growth habit in loropetalum cuttings. Credit: Chris Marble Bittercress commonly grows in the potting media of container-grown ornamentals and often through drainage holes in nursery containers. It also can be a problem in propagation houses, greenhouses, and in the field. This 6-page fact sheet provides species description, plant biology, and management recommendations. Written by Chris Marble, Shawn Steed, and Nathan S. Boyd, and published by the UF Department of Environmental Horticulture, December 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep511

Floriculture Crops Economic Outlook for 2014

flowers in greenhouseThis 15-page report summarizes industry statistics using data from primary and secondary sources and highlights production and sales trends in the US environmental horticulture industry in 2014. Data sources include the United States Department of Agriculture National Agricultural Statistics Service (USDA/NASS), US Census Bureau, the IBIS World Industry Reports, National Association of Home Builders, S&P/Case-Shiller Home Price Indices, US Bureau of Labor Statistics, University of Florida Bureau of Economic and Business Research, AIA Economics and Market Research Group, and Florida Realtors®. Primary data is collected through the National Nursery Survey, conducted by the Green Industry Research Consortium. Written by Hayk Khachatryan, Alan W. Hodges, and Shawn Steed, and published by the UF Department of Food and Resource Economics, March 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fe941

Uso Apropiado y Manipulacion de Glifosato en Viveros de Plantas (ENH1209/EP470)

Figure 3. Coberturas pueden ayudar a reducir la deriva de la aplicaci├│n hacia plantas deseables.El glifosato es el químico de protección para cultivos más vendido en el mundo y el herbicida mós usado en la industria de viveros de plantas en los Estados Unidos. El glifosato es usado para el control post emergente de malezas. Esta publicación describe el uso adecuado de glifosato para los productores de plantas y sus empleados. This 4-page fact sheet was written by Shawn T. Steed, Robert H. Stamps, and Rodrigo Diaz, and published by the UF Department of Environmental Horticulture, February 2013.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep470

Proper Use and Handling of Glyphosate in Plant Nurseries (ENH1198/EP459)

Figure 2.  Too much glyphosate spray has been applied to this plant, and the runoff represents wasted money and time and could negatively affect non-target plants and animals.Glyphosate is the most used herbicide in the nursery industry in the United States. Used for postemergent control of vegetation, it controls annual and perennial grasses, broadleaves, and sedges. But it is easy to cause unintended damage to desirable vegetation if this product is used incorrectly. This 4-page fact sheet outlines the proper use of glyphosate for plant producers and their employees. Written by Shawn T. Steed and Robert H. Stamps and published by the UF Department of Environmental Horticulture, May 2012.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep459

Assessing Economic Impacts and Benefits of Commercial Horticulture Extension Programs (FE898)

agent and producer check strawberries grown in refridgerated trailerAs fiscal pressures increase from federal and state government agencies to spend public dollars more effectively, it is imperative that the outcomes from educational efforts be clearly documented in terms of measurable changes in knowledge and behavior of clientele or stakeholders. This 5-page fact sheet presents a standardized approach for evaluating the economic impacts of extension educational programs in commercial horticulture in Florida, with which impacts are quantified in terms of measurable changes in revenues, income, or jobs. Written by Alan Hodges, Shawn Steed, Jane Morse, Peggy Dessaint, Donald Rainey, and Charles Vavrina, and published by the UF Department of Food and Resource Economics, September 2011. (AP Photo:Thomas Wright, University of Florida/IFAS)
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fe898