Frost Damage of Carinata Grown in the Southeastern US

More severe cold damage of carinata during early bolting. This level of damage is expected to reduce stands and yield. Note that aboveground tissue was severely affected, but neither the growing points nor roots died. This field generally grew back from the growing point, but could have resprouted at the crown if the damage was more severe. UF/IFAS West Florida Research and Education Center, Jay, FL.

Brassica carinata is an annual oilseed crop used for the commercial production of jet fuel. One of the challenges to commercialization of this crop in the southeastern United States has been frost damage. This 4-page fact sheet discusses symptomology and ways to minimize risk of frost damage to carinata. Written by Michael J. Mulvaney, Ramdeo Seepaul, Ian Small, David Wright, Silvana Paula-Moraes, Carl Crozier, Paul Cockson, Brian Whipker, and Ramon Leon, and published by the UF/IFAS Agronomy Department, May 2018.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ag420

AgroClimate Crop Season Planning Tool: Reducing the Risk of Extreme Weather Events During Key Stages of Crop Development

Storm rising over a farm.

This 5-page publication details a new tool available to growers and Extension professionals to manage risks related to climate during seasonal planning stages. The Crop Season Planning tool is a climate-based tool that enables growers to plan planting strategies that will minimize risk to climate extremes based on historical climate data at their location. Written by Caroline G. Staub, Daniel Perondi, Diego Noleto Luz Pequeno, Patrick Troy, Michael J. Mulvaney, Calvin Perry, Brian Hayes, Willingthon Pavan, and Clyde W. Fraisse, and published by the UF/IFAS Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering, March 2018.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ae525

Guide to Olive Tree Nutrition in Florida

A healthy Arbequina olive grove in Volusia County, Florida.A burgeoning olive industry already exists in the southeastern United States, but research and Extension information regarding olive fertilization recommendations in Florida is limited. While there are data and recommendations for olive from the University of California, the University of Georgia (UGA), and other institutions around the world, there are no data from which we can derive Florida-specific recommendations. This 6-page fact sheet uses many of the existing recommendations for mature, high-density, and traditional grove spacing as guidelines until data specific to Florida production are generated. It discusses leaf tissue sampling procedures, leaf tissue sufficiency ranges, nitrogen fertility, phosphorus and potassium fertility, boron, concerns for olive production in Florida, and other resources for olive production in the state. Written by Michael J. Mulvaney, Rao Mylavarapu, Peter C. Andersen, Mack Thetford, and Jennifer L. Gillett-Kaufman, and published by the UF Agronomy Department, May 2016.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ag405

Olives for Your Florida Landscape

Figure 1. A seven-year-old olive tree (Olea europaea 'Mission') in Marion County, Florida, with inset picture of ripening fruit. (Note: the trunk of this tree has been painted white; this is a common practice for olive growers in the Mediterranean region.) Credit: Jennifer L. Gillett-KaufmanOlives have great potential as a landscape ornamental and may also provide opportunities for home fruit production. However, as a relatively new commercial crop to Florida, the cultural requirements of these trees are not completely known and research is ongoing to understand how to manage them for plant health and fruit yield as well as to make recommendations on varietal selections best suited to the southeastern region of the United States. This 5-page fact sheet includes culture and management information, selected references, and a table listing a selection of olive cultivars currently available in the U.S. Written by Mack Thetford, Jennifer L. Gillett-Kaufman, Michael J. Mulvaney, and published by the UF Department of Environmental Horticulture, February 2015.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep515