Seed Piece Spacing Adjustment for Florida Chipping Potato

Seed spacing directly affects crop revenue because the number of potato seeds planted determines the final plant population density. The analysis presented in this 5-page publication was extracted from a series of field trials that looked at improved potato plant arrangement in the field by adjusting seed piece spacing for Florida growing conditions. Written by Fernanda Souza Krupek, Steven A. Sargent, Peter J. Dittmar, and Lincoln Zotarelli and published by the UF/IFAS Horticultural Sciences Department, May 2018.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1317

Irrigation Practices for Peaches in Florida

This 6-page document provides basic information and guidelines on water requirements and irrigation strategies for peaches grown in Florida. Written by C. Zambrano-Vaca, L. Zotarelli, K. Migliaccio, R. Beeson Jr., K. Morgan, J. Chaparro, and M. Olmstead and published by the UF/IFAS Horticultural Sciences Department, April 2018.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1316

Eight New Potato Variety Trials Spotlights

The following eight new potato variety trials spotlights explain the results of the trials and describe the different cultivars. They are published by the Horticultural Sciences Department.

  • HS1293 University of Florida Potato Variety Trials Spotlight: ‘Adirondack Blue’ by Rodrick Z. Mwatuwa, Christian T. Christensen, Pam Solano, and Lincoln Zotarelli
    http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1293
  • HS1294 University of Florida Potato Variety Trials Spotlight: ‘Fabula’ by Rodrick Z. Mwatuwa, Chrsitian T. Christensen, Pam Solano, and Lincoln Zotarellia
    http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1294
  • HS1295 University of Florida Potato Variety Trials Spotlight: ‘Peter Wilcox’ by Rodrick Z. Mwatuwa, Christian T. Christensen, Pam Solano, Kathleen G. Haynes, and Lincoln Zotarelli
    http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1295
  • HS1296 University of Florida Potato Variety Trials Spotlight: ‘Yukon Gold’ by Rodrick Z. Mwatuwa, Christian T. Christensen, Pam Solano, and Lincoln Zotarelli
    http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1296
  • HS1297 University of Florida Potato Variety Trials Spotlight: ‘LaChipper’ by Rodrick Z. Mwatuwa, Christian T. Christensen, Pam Solano, and Lincoln Zotarelli
    http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1297
  • HS1298 University of Florida Potato Variety Trials Spotlight: ‘Harley Blackwell’ by Rodrick Z. Mwatuwa, Christian T. Christensen, Pam Solano, Kathleen G. Haynes, and Lincoln Zotarelli
    http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1298
  • HS1299 University of Florida Potato Variety Trial Spotlight: ‘Goldrush’ by Rodrick Z. Mwatuwa, Christian T. Christensen, Pam Solano, and Lincoln Zotarelli http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1299
  • HS1300 University of Florida Potato Variety Trials Spotlight: ‘French Fingerling’ by Rodrick Z. Mwatuwa, Christian T. Christensen, Pam Solano, and Lincoln Zotarelli
    http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1300

University of Florida Potato Variety Spotlight: Snowden

Figure 1. Typical tuber and internal flesh color of ‘Snowden’ potato variety. Credits: Lincoln Zotarelli, UF/IFAS

This five-page fact sheet describes a new University of Florida potato variety named Snowden. ‘Snowden’ is a potato variety that is commonly grown for the potato chip market. It was named and released in 1990 from the University of Wisconsin’s Lelah Starks Potato Breeding Farm in Rhinelander, WI. Tuber production and quality results provided in this spotlight are summarized from various variety trials conducted by the University of Florida’s Hastings Agricultural and Extension Center from 1998 to 2015. Written by Rodrick Z. Mwatuwa, Christian T. Christensen, and Lincoln Zotarelli and published by the Horticultural Sciences Department.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1286

Creciendo Papas en el Jardín de su Hogar en la Florida

Pick any vegetable crop - from lettuce and tomatoes to peppers and potatoes - chances are IFAS research is helping Florida farmers produce a superior product for consumers in todays copetitive marketplace.
The Irish potato is a cool-season crop. A recently grown and harvested potato exhibits different flavor profiles from one that has been in storage or on a grocery shelf for an extended period. For example, in storage, the starches in potatoes convert to sugars, resulting in a less desirable texture and taste. “New” potato flavor can be achieved in the home garden by following a few growing recommendations. This is ten-page fact sheet is the Spanish language version of HS933 Growing Potatoes in the Florida Home Garden. Written by Christian T. Christensen, Joel Reyes-Cabrera, Lincoln Zotarelli, Wendy J. Dahl, Doug Gergela, Jeffery E. Pack, James M. White, and Chad M. Hutchinson.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1282

University of Florida Potato Variety Spotlight: 'Atlantic'

Figure 1. Typical tuber set and internal flesh color of Atlantic. Credits: Lincoln Zotarelli

This article introduces the potato variety, ‘Atlantic’, which was tested in trials at the University of Florida.’Atlantic’ is a white-skinned, chipping potato commonly cultivated in Florida and resealed as a white mutant of the USDA breeding program. This three-page fact sheet provides the general characteristics, season length and growth information, fertilization and planting instructions, as well as disease information for the potato variety, ‘Atlantic’. Written by Rodrick Z. Mwatuwa, Christian T. Christensen, and Lincoln Zotarelli, and published by the Horticultural Sciences Department.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1278

University of Florida Potato Variety Spotlight: ‘Marcy’

Figure 1. Typical tuber and internal flesh color of Marcy potato variety. Credits: Lincoln Zotarelli
This article introduces the potato variety, ‘Marcy’, which was developed at the University of Florida. ‘Marcy’ is a white-flesh and white-skinned fresh-market potato variety that has demonstrated high yield and good tuber characteristics. This three-page fact sheet provides the general characteristics, season length and growth information, fertilization and planting instructions, as well as disease information for the potato variety, ‘Marcy’.
Written by Rodrick Z. Mwatuwa, Christian T. Christensen, and Lincoln Zotarelli, and published by the Horticultural Sciences Department.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1277

Potato Vine Killing or Desiccation

Pick any vegetable crop - from lettuce and tomatoes to peppers and potatoes - chances are IFAS research is helping Florida farmers produce a superior product for consumers in todays copetitive marketplace.
Proper tuber maturity at harvest is an important factor in producing high-quality fresh-market potatoes. Tuber maturity is generally recognized as an important determinant of storage ability and cooking quality. Maturation can be artificially induced by killing the potato vines prior to harvest. This will benefit tuber appearance, limit tuber size, and improve tuber release from the vine. This four-page fact sheet describes the importance of tuber maturation, potato vine killing timing and available methods, and how to determine when to vine kill and when to harvest after vine kill. Written by Lincoln Zotarelli, Steven Sargent, Peter Dittmar, and Mildred Makani, and published by the Horticultural Sciences Department.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs181

What is 4R nutrient stewardship?

A man checks fertilizer levels on a tractor on a farm
A new and innovative approach to Best Management Practices for fertilizer application known as 4R nutrient stewardship is available, to ensure the environmental, social, and economical sustainability of commercial crop production. This 3-page fact sheet focuses on the basic concepts of the 4R nutrient stewardship principles for commercial crop production. Written by Guodong Liu, Kelly Morgan, Yuncong Li, Lincoln Zotarelli, James DeValerio, and Qingren Wang, and published by the UF Department of Horticultural Sciences, July 2015.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1264

SmartIrrigation Avocado App: A Step-by-Step Guide

Figure 1. SmartIrrigation Avocado app iconUF’s SmartIrrigation Avocado for iOS and Android platforms provides a simple ET-based method to schedule irrigation and is expected to provide 20% to 50% water savings based on findings with other schedule tools. This 6-page fact sheet provides configuration instructions and main menu features. Written by D. Mbabazi, K. W. Migliaccio, J. H. Crane, J. H. Debastiani Andreis, C. Fraisse, L. Zotarelli, and K. T. Morgan, and published by the UF Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering, May 2015.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ae513

Controlled-Release and Slow-Release Fertilizers as Nutrient Management Tools

UF/IFAS recommends nutrient management practices that will reduce harmful nitrate levels in the river, springs and groundwaterThere are many fertilizer sources available for commercial crop production. The characteristics of each fertilizer type determine whether its use poses an advantage or a disadvantage to a farmer. This 6-page fact sheet focuses on how to select the right fertilizer to enhance profitability and satisfy best management practices (BMPs). Written by Guodong Liu, Lincoln Zotarelli, Yuncong Li, David Dinkins, Qingren Wang, and Monica Ozores-Hampton, and published by the UF Department of Horticultural Sciences, October 2014. (UF/IFAS Photo by Thomas Wright)
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1255

Factors Affecting the Choice of Irrigation Systems for Florida Tomato Production

four red tomatoesSeveral economic factors should be considered in selecting an agricultural irrigation system. This 7-page fact sheet compares two widely used irrigation systems for tomato production: seepage and sub-surface drip irrigation. Written by Jenna Rogers, Tatiana Borisova, Jeffrey Ullman, Kelly Morgan, Lincoln Zotarelli, and Kelly Grogan, and published by the UF Department of Food and Resource Economics, October 2014. (UF/IFAS Photo: Tyler Jones)
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fe960

Converting from seepage irrigation to plasticulture for vegetable production: a case study and on-farm demonstration

Figure 6. Soil moisture sensors installed under plastic mulch in both inner and outer plant rows.Cabbage production in Florida has been dominated by the use of seepage or sub-irrigation, because it is inexpensive to maintain and simple to use, but it can require vast quantities of water to be pumped from the aquifer in low rainfall years. Plasticulture has been proposed as an alternative production method for cabbage production in Florida. An on-farm demonstration was setup on Greene’s Farms in Bunnell, FL to provide a platform for collaboration between researchers, growers and extension professionals. This 6-page fact sheet illustrates an innovative approach converting from seepage irrigation to plasticulture and points out some options and challenges for growers considering a plasticulture system. Written by Charles E. Barrett, Lincoln Zotarelli, Brian S. Taylor, Lucas G. Paranhos, and Mark Warren, and published by the UF Department of Horticultural Sciences, July 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1246

Growth Stages and Tuber Development of FL1867 Potato under Full and Reduced Irrigation Scheduling

Figure 1. Whole plant samples of FL 1867 during the 2012 growing season at 41 DAP (A), 48 DAP (B), 54 DAP (C), 61 DAP (D), 75 DAP (E), and 90 DAP (F).The potato cultivar ‘Frito Lay 1867’ (‘FL 1867’) is a popular chipping variety grown across Florida and the southern United States. Knowledge of the timing and duration of the tuber initiation and tuber bulking stages for ‘FL 1867’ is critical for timing fertilizer and irrigation applications. So to evaluate the start and length of the tuber initiation and tuber bulking stages under Florida growing conditions, ‘FL 1867’ plants were dug up and photographed on a weekly basis from a commercial field near Live Oak, FL in 2012. This 3-page fact sheet was written by Seth A. Byrd, Diane L. Rowland, and Lincoln Zotarelli, and published by the UF Department of Agronomy, September 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ag388

University of Florida Potato Variety Trial Program: 'Elkton' Commercial Evaluation

Figure 1. Overview of a commercial evaluation site of ‘Elkton’ and ‘Atlantic’ at a grower’s field in Hastings, Florida during spring, 2011. The flagged potato rows were planted with ‘Elkton’; the other rows were planted with 'Atlantic.'The ‘Elkton’ chipping potato variety was tested on a commercial scale at two growers’ farms in Florida during the 2011 season. The average yield of ‘Elkton’ in the commercial trials ranged between 295 and 324 cwt/ac, an average of 11 percent higher than that of the standard ‘Atlantic,’ and comparable to the yield range obtained in 19 trials conducted over a nine-year period by the University of Florida. This 4-page fact sheet was written by Lincoln Zotarelli, Douglas Gergela, and Dana Fourman, and published by the UF Department of Horticultural Sciences, October 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1253

Costs and Benefits of More Efficient Irrigation Systems for Florida Chipping Potato Production

potatoesThe goal of this 11-page fact sheet is to help producers and other interested parties understand how alternative irrigation systems can affect economic outcomes in agricultural operations. We used chipping potato production in the Hastings area in northeast Florida as an example to discuss factors to consider when selecting an irrigation system. Written by Jenna Rogers, Tatiana Borisova, Lincoln Zotarelli, Kelly Grogan, Jeffrey Ullman, Jessica Bertine, and Kelly Morgan, and published by the UF Department of Food and Resource Economics, September 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fe953

University of Florida Potato Variety Spotlight: 'Elkton'

Figure 1. Typical tuber set and internal flesh color of 'Elkton' 'Elkton' is a white-flesh potato variety suitable for chipping directly from the field. 'Elkton' was selected from the USDA-ARS breeding program in Beltsville, Maryland, by Dr. Haynes in 1997. In 2003, seed of 'Elkton' was made available for field evaluation under Florida growing conditions. In 19 trials conducted between 2003 and 2012, 'Elkton' yielded 111% in comparison with 'Atlantic'. In these trials, 'Elkton' demonstrated resistance to internal heat necrosis and hollow heart, which are common tuber physiological disorders under high-temperature growing conditions. This 3-page fact sheet was written by Lincoln Zotarelli, Douglas Gergela, Kathleen Haynes, and Dana Fourman, and published by the UF Department of Horticultural Sciences, April 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1237

University of Florida Potato Variety Spot Light: Red LaSoda

Figure 1. Typical tuber skin and internal flesh color of Red LaSoda.Red LaSoda is the red-skinned fresh-market potato standard for Florida. It was observed in 1949 as a deep red mutant of LaSoda in the Louisiana potato breeding program. It has been in trials over many seasons and at many locations in Florida including university and grower sites. Production and quality results provided in this 4-page fact sheet are summarized from the red-skinned fresh-market trials conducted by the University of Florida over the past 14 seasons. Written by Lincoln Zotarelli, Doug Gergela, Chad M. Hutchinson, David Dinkins, and Edsel Redden, and published by the UF Department of Horticultural Sciences, August 2013.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs323

Minimum Number of Soil Moisture Sensors for Monitoring and Irrigation Purposes

Figure 4. Soil moisture distribution mapsManaging soil moisture properly through irrigation is key to increasing crop yield and conserving water. By understanding soil moisture variability, growers can better manage their irrigation systems to apply the right amount of water at the right time. This 4-page fact sheet proposes guidelines for soil moisture sampling that account for spatial variability, which helps to determine the minimum number of soil moisture sensors required to survey and monitor a specific area for irrigation. Written by Lincoln Zotarelli, Michael D. Dukes, and Marcelo Paranhos, and published by the UF Department of Horticultural Sciences, July 2013.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1222

Trastornos fisiologicos de la papa: Necrosis por calor interno

Figure 1.  Los síntomas de necrosis de calor interno en el mercado fresco de papas ‘Red LaSoda’. Credit: La necrosis por calor interno (NCI) es un trastorno fisiológico que causa un pardeamiento inaceptable del tejido del tubrculo y puede causar pérdidas económicas para el productor. Las tres principales causas de la NCI en los tubérculos es la alta temperatura en el suelo, la humedad inadecuada del suelo y la nutrición sub-óptima de la planta, o la combinación de estos factores. This 4-page fact sheet, the Spanish language version of HS1145, Potato Physiological Disorders: Internal Heat Necrosis was written by L. Zotarelli, J. E. Reyes-Cabrera, C. M. Worthington, C. Hutchinson, S. Byrd, D. Gergela, y D. L. Rowland, and published by the UF Department of Horticultural Sciences, May 2013.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1221