The Art of Goodbye: Medicare Covers Advance Care Planning

Elderly person receiving assistance from a caregiver with everyday tasks. UF/IFAS Marisol Amador

This 4-page document is part of a series which addresses end-of-life concerns, entitled The Art of Goodbye. The publication discusses the Patient Self-Determination Act, advance care planning, and communication about advance care planning. Written by Lynda Spence, and published by the UF/IFAS Department of Family, Youth and Community Sciences, July 2018.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fy1471

Key Plant, Key Pests: Chinese Elm (Ulmus parvifolia)

This 5-page document is one in the Key Plant, Key Pests series. It helps identify common pests found on the Chinese elm (Ulmus parvifolia). Written by Juanita Popenoe, Caroline R. Warwick, and Richard Beeson Jr. and published by the UF/IFAS Environmental Horticulture Department, July 2018.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep559

Control of Black Medic in Strawberry Production

Black medic is an annual broadleaf weed that competes with strawberry crops and impedes harvest. This 4-page document describes how to manage black medic in strawberry production. Written by Shaun M. Sharpe and Nathan S. Boyd and published by the UF/IFAS Horticultural Sciences Department, July 2018.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1319

Stinging and Venomous Caterpillars of the Southeast

io moth caterpillar Automeris io

Wasp and bee stings are familiar to most people, but some might be surprised to learn that several caterpillars can also sting. Unlike wasps and bees with stingers, these caterpillars have barbed hairs that break off the caterpillar when it brushes against something. The hairs embed in skin and cause sudden or gradually building pain. The severity of a caterpillar sting varies based on the person and number of spines in the skin. Many stinging caterpillars also release a toxin on contact, which may cause health problems for some people. This 4-page fact sheet written by Rebecca Perry and Adam Dale and published by the UF/IFAS Department of Entomology and Nematology describes several stinging caterpillars commonly found throughout the southeastern United States.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/in014

Feral Swine Trapping: Techniques and Designs

Feral hogs resemble domestic hogs, but are usually leaner

Feral swine are an invasive or nuisance species in Florida and most other states because their incessant rooting is ruinous to natural and agricultural habitat. They loosen the soil, destroy native vegetation, and modify the natural chemistry and nutrients of the soil, causing widespread destruction in natural ecosystems, agricultural areas, livestock pastures, and residential areas. They also carry numerous diseases, some of which are transmittable to wild and domestic animals and humans. Trapping and removing swine from your property is an effective way to reduce or control feral swine populations. This 9-page fact sheet written by Bethany Wight and Raoul K. Boughton and published by the UF/IFAS Wildlife Ecology and Conservation Department describes the most commonly used trapping techniques and illustrates several trap and gate designs.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/uw440

Best Practices for Scalloping: From the Boat to Your Plate

scallops on ice Tommy Thompson

Recreational scalloping in Florida is a popular group activity for many residents and visitors throughout the summer months. This 6-page fact sheet written by Brittany Hall-Scharf, Sarah Ellis, and Savanna Barry and published by the UF/IFAS Florida Sea Grant College Program lists the legal requirements for boating and scalloping, provides a safety plan to minimize and/or prevent accidents while you’re out on the water, and explains proper shucking methods to ensure that the meals you make from your catch will be safe and delicious.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/sg158

The Migration Pattern of Florida Seasonal Farmworkers

Workers picking and loading lettuce onto a conveyor belt UF/IFAS Photo by Tyler Jones.

This 4-page fact sheet written by Zhengfei Guan, Berdikul Qushim, Feng Wu, and Alicia Whidden and published by the UF/IFAS Food and Resource Economics Department investigates the migration pattern of seasonal farmworkers based on a survey of strawberry harvesters conducted in 2016. In the survey, we asked workers where they were working and what crops they were working on before their current jobs. We also asked where they would migrate and what crops they would be working on after the strawberry harvest. We found that most workers were from Florida, Michigan, North Carolina, and California in that order, and that similar percentages of workers would migrate to these states after the job. Blueberries, tomatoes, and apples were the top three crops they were working on before and after their current jobs.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fe1040

Key Plant, Key Pests: Crapemyrtle (Lagerstroemia)

This 4-page document is one in the Key Plant, Key Pests series. It helps identify pests found on the crapemyrtle, one of the most common landscape plants in north and central Florida. Written by Juanita Popenoe, Caroline R. Warwick, and Chris Marble and published by the UF/IFAS Environmental Horticulture Department, June 2018.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep560

Packaging and Storage of Hops (Humulus lupulus)

Hops (Humulus lupulus) are an essential ingredient to the production of beer. This 3-page document describes how to properly store and package hops. Written by Brian Pearson and Sean Campbell and published by the UF/IFAS Environmental Horticulture Department, June 2018.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep561

Helping Agritourism Visitors Learn During Their Visits

Agritourism is a growing industry in Florida, and combines two of the state’s major assets: tourism and agriculture. This 4-page document outlines ways that agritourism operators can incorporate meaningful educational opportunities into their operation. Written by Kathryn Stofer and Joy N. Rumble and published by the UF/IFAS Department of Agricultural Education and Communication, June 2018.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/wc308

Key Plant, Key Pests: Camellia

This 7-page document is one in the Key Plant, Key Pests series. It discusses identification and management of pests found on the camellia, a flowering plant common in Southern landscapes. Written by Juanita Popenoe, Caroline R. Warwick, and Brian Pearson and published by the UF/IFAS Environmental Horticulture Department, June 2018.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep558

Managing Southern Chinch Bug in Warm Season Turfgrasses

Figure 1. Southern chinch bug, Blissus insularis Barber. From left to right: nymph, short-wing, and long-wing adults

Southern chinch bug, Blissus isularis Barber, is the most damaging insect pest of St. Augustinegrass in the United States. St. Augustinegrass is the most common turfgrass used in Florida. The ubiquity of this single turfgrass species makes southern chinch bug an economically important pest in the state. In fact, chinch bugs cost Florida homeowners and professionals millions of dollars every year. This 7-page fact sheet written by Eileen A. Buss, Brianna M. Whitman, and Adam G. Dale and published by the UF/IFAS Department of Entomology and Nematology describes the biology of the pest and the damage it causes and lists ways to scout and monitor for chinch bugs and some strategies for control of the pest.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/lh036

Key Plant, Key Pests: Baldcypress (Taxodium distichum)

This 4-page document is one in the Key Plant, Key Pests series. It provides information on the management of common pests found on baldcypress. Written by Juanita Popenoe, Caroline R. Warwick, and Roger Kjelgren and published by the UF/IFAS Environmental Horticulture Department, June 2018.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep557

Teaching for Extrinsic Motivation

Figure 3. Successful parents and teachers are encouraging and engaged in children’s educational and extracurricular activities.

Motivation is the idea of being moved to do something, and levels of motivation vary among every individual. Extrinsic motivation is a specific type of motivation that is fueled by external rewards or an expected outcome. This 2-page document, written by Isabella Damiani, Andrew Thoron, and J. C. Bunch and published by the UF/IFAS Department of Agricultural Education and Communication, discusses how educators can foster extrinsic motivation among their students.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/wc307

A Brief Summary of the Water Bill, SB 552

suburban landscape

This 5-page document written by Lisa Krimsky, Andrea Albertin, Charles Barrett, James Fletcher, and Mary Lusk and published by the UF/IFAS Program in Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences of the School of Forest Resources and Conservation is intended to act as a quick reference guide and is not inclusive of all measures in SB 552. This summary addresses the Florida Springs and Aquifer Protection Act, the Central Florida Water Initiative, Northern Everglades and Estuaries Protection, and Pilot Programs for Alternative Water Supply.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fa205

Cost and Return Estimates of a Mamey Sapote Grove in South Florida, 2017

The objective of this 6-page fact sheet written by Fredy H. Ballen, Aditya Singh, Edward A. Evans, and Jonathan Crane and published by the UF/IFAS Food and Resource Economics Department is to provide an estimate of the costs and returns associated with an established mamey sapote orchard in south Florida.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fe1039

Bed Fishing for Florida Bass

Florida bass guarding fry

Florida bass, Micropterus floridanus, is the most popular freshwater sport fish in the state of Florida. Florida bass guard their nests for up to 2 weeks, and many anglers target the prized sport fish during this period using a procedure called bed fishing. This 7-page fact sheet written by John S. Hargrove and James D. Austin and published by the UF/IFAS School of Forest Resources and Conservation, Program in Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences, outlines the reproductive biology of Florida bass, the known consequences of bed fishing, and practices to minimize its impacts.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fa204

Cat’s-Claw Vine, Dolichandra unguis-cati : A Showy but Invasive Plant in Florida


Cat’s-claw vine is a neotropical, climbing perennial that produces large and showy yellow flowers in the springtime. Unfortunately, the aggressive nature of the vine has made it a major weed in China, Australia, South Africa, and parts of the southeastern United States. This 6-page fact sheet written by Niels Proctor and Jason Smith and published by the UF/IFAS School of Forest Resources and Conservation provides guidance on identification and control of this invasive vine and suggests some similar native vines to use instead.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fr391

Selecting Educational Resources

Figure 1. Parents and teachers need to be clear about their expectations for children and students. Credit: Thinkstock.com/iStock/natasaadzic

Many instructors struggle to find appropriate educational resources. However, collaborative teaching and learning efforts have created a number of educational resources that can be stored, shared, adapted, and used within the agricultural education profession. This 7-page document will help educators in selecting educational resources. Written by Tyler D’Angelo, Deb Barry, J. C. Bunch, and Andrew Thoron and published by the UF/IFAS Department of Agricultural Education and Communication, June 2018.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/wc303